Paths of Glory (1957) - News Poster

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The Other Side of the Booth: A Profile of James B. Harris in Present Day Los Angeles

  • MUBI
Courtesy of James B. HarrisIt’s a Sunday afternoon in Los Angeles and 89-year-old writer/director/producer James B. Harris (Some Call It Loving, 1973; Fast-Walking, 1982) has agreed to meet me for brunch at Coogie’s Cafe. Coogie’s is exactly the sort of unassuming American diner where girls in pink velvet jackets and shimmery silver skirts go to blend in with the Pepto-Bismol-colored booths. There are a pair of flat screen TVs on the wall, which are mercifully muted. A radio in some far-off corner of the kitchen can be heard playing inoffensive pop tunes of yesteryear. It is also the sort of quiet place where someone like Harris is well-known, well-liked, and referred to as “Mr. James” by the entire waitstaff. The impression is one of polite reverence and earned familiarity, built up over time and solidified through an appreciation of his impressive filmography, as well as his continued business.
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Best Films About Veterans’ Return Home

Best Films About Veterans’ Return Home
Hollywood loves war movies. Many great films depict people during combat, in various wars: Wwi (“Paths of Glory”), WWII (“Hacksaw Ridge,” “Saving Private Ryan”), Korea (“Mash”), Vietnam (“Platoon,” “Deer Hunter,” “Full Metal Jacket”), and the Middle East (“The Hurt Locker,” “Zero Dark Thirty,” “Lone Survivor”). There are also Pow movies, including “Stalag 17,” “Bridge on the River Kwai” and “The Great Escape.” But it’s much rarer to find films that depict a person’s return to civilian life. So here are some American movies, all English-language that depict that situation. Some of these films do indeed depict scenes in battle, but the crux of the movie is the return home.

Related storiesHollywood Embraces American Veterans Seeking Jobs in the Entertainment IndustryMilitary-Themed Projects Aim to Raise Empathy for American VetsBox Office: 'Jigsaw' Dominates Pre-Halloween Weekend With $16.3 Million
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Christopher Nolan Gets Candid on the State of Movies, Rise of TV and Spielberg’s Influence

Christopher Nolan Gets Candid on the State of Movies, Rise of TV and Spielberg’s Influence
There have been extensive doom-and-gloom scenarios about the demise of movies lately, but writer-director Christopher Nolan isn’t among those sounding the death knell. Last summer, as the box office and attendance careened toward their lowest levels in decades, Nolan put his artistry where his optimism was — delivering a jolt of pure cinema with “Dunkirk.”

The picture thrusts viewers into one of the turning points of World War II, recounting a moment when British forces faced total annihilation at the hands of the Nazis. Shot with Imax cameras and presented in 70mm, it also serves as a potent reminder that some things are best delivered on the widest screens possible. “Dunkirk” not only garnered massive critical acclaim, but audiences around the globe flocked to see the film, which grossed $524 million worldwide.

“At a time when there’s all kinds of storytelling around, movies that gravitate toward things that only movies can do carve out a place for themselves
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Play Dirty

In a war film, what’s the difference between nasty exploitation and just plain honest reportage? André De Toth made tough-minded action films with the best of them, and this nail-biting commando mission with Michael Caine and Nigel Davenport is simply superb, one of those great action pictures that’s not widely screened. To its credit it’s not ‘feel good’ enough to be suitable for Memorial Day TV marathons.

Play Dirty

Blu-ray

Twilight Time

1968 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 118 min. / Street Date October 17, 2017 / Available from the Twilight Time Movies Store 29.95

Starring: Michael Caine, Nigel Davenport, Nigel Green, Harry Andrews.

Cinematography: Edward Scaife

Film Editor: Jack Slade

Art Direction: Tom Morahan, Maurice Pelling

Original Music: Michel Legrand

Written by Lotte Colin, Melvyn Bragg, from a story by George Marton

Produced by Harry Saltzman

Directed by André De Toth

Some movies that were ignored when new now seem far more important, perhaps due to the tenor of times.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Pain Pays the Income of Each Precious Thing: Stanley Kubrick's "Barry Lyndon"

  • MUBI
“For an intellectual product of any value to exert an immediate influence which shall also be deep and lasting, it must rest on an inner harmony, yes, an affinity, between the personal destiny of its author and that of his contemporaries in general.”—Thomas Mann, Death in Venice Barry Lyndon. I can’t believe there was a time when I didn’t know that name. Barry Lyndon means an artwork both grand and glum. Sadness inconsolable. A cello bends out a lurid sound, staining the air before a piano droopingly follows in the third movement of Vivaldi's “Cello Concerto in E Minor.” This piece, which dominates the second half of the film, steers the hallowed half of my head to bask in the film’s high melancholic temperature. Why should I so often remember it? What did I have to do with this film? I only received it with
See full article at MUBI »

Sam Claflin & amp; Paul Bettany Go To War In Vital ‘Journey’s End’ [BFI London Film Fest Review]

  • The Playlist
While it sometimes feels that you can’t move from WWII movies (this summer’s megahit “Dunkirk” first and foremost among them recently), its predecessor is more neglected in cinema on the whole. A number of great films have been made about Wwi (or The Great War, as it was known at the time), including Oscar-winner “All Quiet On The Western Front,” Stanley Kubrick’s “Paths Of Glory” and Peter Weir’s “Gallipoli,” but it’s been a while since the last really notable one, beyond it serving as a slightly queasy backdrop for “Wonder Woman.”

It’s a harder conflict to make work cinematically in a lot of ways .

Continue reading Sam Claflin & amp; Paul Bettany Go To War In Vital ‘Journey’s End’ [BFI London Film Fest Review] at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

Giveaway – Win The Vikings starring Kirk Douglas, Tony Curtis, Ernest Borgnine & Janet Leigh

Eureka Entertainment is set to release The Vikings, Richard Fleischer’s rip-roaring action adventure packed with stunning visuals, brutal action and a star-studded cast, as part of the Eureka Classics range on Blu-ray for the first time in the UK on October 16th 2017, and we’ve got three copies to give away; read on for details of how to enter…

One of the most spectacular and action packed epics of the fifties, Richard Fleischer’s The Vikings wowed audiences worldwide with its stunning visuals, brutal action and star studded cast.

Prince Einar (Kirk Douglas, Paths of Glory, Ace in the Hole) is the son and heir of a savage Viking chieftain (Ernest Borgnine, Violent Saturday, The Wild Bunch). Prince Eric (Tony Curtis, Some Like it Hot) is his unknowing half-brother, the bastard offspring of Einar’s father and an English queen. When the Vikings kidnap the princess Morgana (Janet Leigh,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Film/TV News: Richard Anderson, Oscar Goldman in ‘The Six Million Dollar Man,’ Dies at 91

  • HollywoodChicago.com
Los Angeles – We can’t rebuild him, but we can honor him. Richard Anderson, best known for portraying Oscar Goldman, the aide de camp of Steve Austin (Lee Majors) in “The Six Million Man,” died on August 31st, 2017 at age 91. The versatile character actor was one of the few remaining performers that came up through the old studio system, in this case the dream factory known as Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer.

Richard Anderson in Chicago, 2010

Photo credit: Joe Arce of Starstruck Foto for HollywoodChicago.com

Richard Anderson was born in New Jersey, and was an Army veteran of World War II. He started out in the mailroom at MGM shortly after the end of the war, and became a contract player for the studio after Cary Grant took an interest in his career. His major film debut was “The Magnificent Yankee” (1950), followed by “Scaramouche” (1952) and “Forbidden Planet” (1956). He made 24 films for MGM. His
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Remembering Glen Campbell, Jerry Lewis, Tobe Hooper and More Reel-Important People We Lost in August

  • Movies.com
Reel-Important People is a monthly column that highlights those individuals in or related to the movies that have left us in recent weeks. Below you'll find names big and small and from all areas of the industry, though each was significant to the movies in his or her own way. Richard Anderson (1926-2017) - Actor. In addition to starring on TV's The Six Million Dollar Man and The Bionic Woman, he co-starred in Stanley Kubrick's Paths of GloryForbidden Planet, Tora! Tora! Tora!, SecondsSeven Days in May and The Long, Hot Summer. He died on August 31. (THR) Joseph Bologna (1934-2017) - Actor, Writer. He received an Oscar nomination for co-writing the adaptation of Lovers and Other Strangers and also...

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Richard Anderson, ‘Six Million Dollar Man’ and ‘Bionic Woman’ Actor, Dies at 91

Richard Anderson, ‘Six Million Dollar Man’ and ‘Bionic Woman’ Actor, Dies at 91
Richard Anderson, who simultaneously played Oscar Goldman, leader of secret government agent the Osi, on both “The Six Million Dollar Man” and “The Bionic Woman” after a long career as a supporting actor in film and TV, died on Thursday in his Beverly Hills home. He was 91.

Anderson famously intoned the words heard in voiceover in the opening credits of “The Six Million Dollar Man”: “Gentlemen, we can rebuild him. We have the technology. We have the capability to make the world’s first bionic man. Steve Austin will be that man. Better than he was before. Better … stronger … faster.”

Anderson was one of a handful of actors who’ve played the same character simultaneously on more than one series on an ongoing basis; some actors in the “Law & Order” franchise made occasional or special appearances on another “Law & Order” series, but were not seen regularly on more than one series.

Related
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Richard Anderson, ‘Six Million Dollar Man’ and ‘Bionic Woman’ Actor, Dies at 91

Richard Anderson, ‘Six Million Dollar Man’ and ‘Bionic Woman’ Actor, Dies at 91
Richard Anderson, who simultaneously played Oscar Goldman, leader of secret government agent the Osi, on both “The Six Million Dollar Man” and “The Bionic Woman” after a long career as a supporting actor in film and TV, died on Thursday in his Beverly Hills home. He was 91.

Anderson famously intoned the words heard in voiceover in the opening credits of “The Six Million Dollar Man”: “Gentlemen, we can rebuild him. We have the technology. We have the capability to make the world’s first bionic man. Steve Austin will be that man. Better than he was before. Better … stronger … faster.”

Anderson was one of a handful of actors who’ve played the same character simultaneously on more than one series on an ongoing basis; some actors in the “Law & Order” franchise made occasional or special appearances on another “Law & Order” series, but were not seen regularly on more than one series.

In
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Richard Anderson, ‘Six Million Dollar Man’ Actor, Dies at 91

  • The Wrap
Richard Anderson, ‘Six Million Dollar Man’ Actor, Dies at 91
Richard Anderson, an actor known for “The Six Million Dollar Man” and “The Bionic Woman,” died Thursday at age 91. His publicist confirmed the news. Anderson launched his Hollywood career with roles in such films as “Forbidden Planet” (1956) and Stanley Kubrick’s “Paths of Glory” (1957). He landed recurring roles on “Perry Mason” and “The Man From U.N.C.L.E.” before debuting on “The Six Million Dollar Man” in 1974 as Oscar Goldman, the boss of Steve Austin (Lee Majors). Also Read: David Letterman Mourns Death of Friend Jay Thomas: 'Nobody Could Throw a Football Like Jay' This would become Anderson’s signature role,
See full article at The Wrap »

Stanley Kubrick Films Ranked, From ‘The Shining’ to ‘2001: A Space Odyssey’

  • Indiewire
Stanley Kubrick Films Ranked, From ‘The Shining’ to ‘2001: A Space Odyssey’
Today would have been Stanley Kubrick’s 89th birthday. The director passed away in 1999 as he was completing his 13th and final feature film, “Eyes Wide Shut,” at the age of 70.

In honor of the great director’s career, eight members of the IndieWire staff — William Earl, Kate Erbland, David Ehrlich, Eric Kohn, Michael Nordine, Zack Sharf, Anne Thompson, and this author — individually ranked the director’s films, which have been averaged together to result in the following list. While Kubrick only made 13 films over a 46-year span, he made more than his fair share of masterpieces. As a sign of just how deep the quality of this list runs, six different titles received first-place votes, while in the final tally the difference between #1 and #7 was razor thin.

Read More Why David Lynch Has Become the Most Important Actor on ‘Twin Peaks

13. “Fear and Desire” (1953)

At the age of 23, Kubrick
See full article at Indiewire »

The Best War Movies Ever Made — IndieWire Critics Survey

  • Indiewire
The Best War Movies Ever Made — IndieWire Critics Survey
Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of film and TV critics two questions and publishes the results on Monday. (The answer to the second, “What is the best film in theaters right now?”, can be found at the end of this post.)

This week’s question: In honor of Christopher Nolan’s “Dunkirk,” what is the best war movie ever made?

Read More‘Dunkirk’ Review: Christopher Nolan’s Monumental War Epic Is The Best Film He’s Ever Made Richard Brody (@tnyfrontrow), The New Yorker

Howard Hawks’ “The Dawn Patrol,” from 1930, shows soldiers and officers cracking up from the cruelty of their missions — and shows the ones who manage not to, singing and clowning with an exuberance that suggests the rictus of a death mask. There’s courage and heroism, virtue and honor — at a price that makes the words themselves seem foul. John Ford’s “The Lost Patrol,
See full article at Indiewire »

With Dunkirk, Christopher Nolan has finally hit the heights of Kubrick

Any mention of the K-word in relation to Nolan has long prompted sneers, but his 10th film is dizzying, dazzling and diamond-hard. It could be his Paths of Glory

For quite a while now – at least since the release of Inception in 2010, Christopher Nolan has been regularly touted as the modern counterpart to the late, great Stanley Kubrick, whose dazzling accomplishments across multiple genres are generally held as the benchmark of American cinema. Back in 2010 those comparisons seemed absurd: how could the writer-director of classy-but-overthought superhero movies, as well as middling oddities such as The Prestige, be seriously thought of in the same bracket as the lambent mind behind Dr Strangelove, 2001: A Space Odyssey, A Clockwork Orange and Barry Lyndon?

Well, it probably helps that Nolan and Kubrick share a studio – Warner Bros – whose marketing department have been probably the most active in seeding the whispers of equivalency. Nolan
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

‘War for the Planet of the Apes’ Review

Stars: Andy Serkis, Woody Harrelson, Amiah Miller, Steve Zahn, Karin Konoval | Written by Matt Reeves, Mark Bomback | Directed by Matt Reeves

Matt Reeves is telling us something: This is what happens when a blockbuster budget is used well. The third part of the Apes reboot, following Rupert Wyatt’s Rise and Reeves’ Dawn, may be the pinnacle of the series so far.

In a universe of cinematic universes, War for the Planet of the Apes bucks the trend and feels like a different beast to its predecessors: a true next chapter, with a different mood and a new rhythm, and the balls to bring beloved characters to the end of their arc.

Following the catastrophic events of Dawn of the Planet of the Apes, in which civil war broke out between the proud Caesar (Andy Serkis) and the hateful Koba (Tony Kebbell), relations between humans and apes are at an all-time low.
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

'Full Metal Jacket': THR's 1987 Review

'Full Metal Jacket': THR's 1987 Review
On June 17, 1987, Stanley Kubrick's Full Metal Jacket premiered in Beverly Hills. The anti-war film comprised two acts — the first at the U.S. Marine Corps trailing facility in Parris Island, and the second in Vietnam on the eve of the Tet Offensive. The Hollywood Reporter's original review is below.

Stanley Kubrick has made two great anti-war movies, Paths of Glory and Dr. Strangelove. His latest anti-war effort, Full Metal Jacket, belongs on the other end of the filmmaking spectrum. Unfortunately, the word that Warner Bros. has had trouble inserting into some print ads also applies to this didactic, static harangue....
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

‘Filmworker’ Review: Stanley Kubrick’s Right-Hand Man Gets His Due in Tony Zierra’s Workmanlike Documentary

  • Indiewire
‘Filmworker’ Review: Stanley Kubrick’s Right-Hand Man Gets His Due in Tony Zierra’s Workmanlike Documentary
Leon Vitali has been described as a jack of all trades, an Igor-like figure, the moth to Stanley Kubrick’s flame, even a slave. He has a different title for himself, however: filmworker. It’s what he puts on visa applications when traveling to other countries and, considering his all-encompassing job description, it only makes sense that he would require a singular title.

It’s also what Tony Zierra named his suitably workmanlike documentary about Vitali, whose heretofore unheralded work behind the scenes is now on full display in the Cannes Classics sidebar. An actor who got his would-be big break in “Barry Lyndon,” Vitali made a unique career choice following the film’s success: He became Kubrick’s right-hand man. Seeing such an elaborate production come together — Vitali had been acting for years, but never on something that matched the grand scale of “Barry Lyndon” — instilled in him a
See full article at Indiewire »

Film Review: ‘Five Came Back’

Film Review: ‘Five Came Back’
World War II taught the world to be distrustful of propaganda, as the public came to realize just how effectively cinema could be used to spread anti-Semitism and a lock-step, sieg-heil conformity to demagogues. And yet, among the many insights of Mark Harris’ richly researched book “Five Came Back” — which fleshed out an oft-overlooked chapter of Hollywood history while shading a far more over-scrutinized one in the vast military history canon — was director William Wyler’s view that “all film is propaganda.” Like a loaded weapon, the power and world-changing potential of a camera is all in who’s holding it, and where that person chooses to point it.

Now, Harris’ terrific book has inspired a glossy, if somewhat snooze-inducing Netflix miniseries, “Five Came Back,” directed by Laurent Bouzereau. Simultaneously released in New York and Los Angeles theaters for an Oscar-qualifying run (offering fodder for those awards prognosticators looking for
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Drive-In Dust Offs: Count Yorga, Vampire (1970)

  • DailyDead
As the ‘60s gave way to the ‘70s, vampires on film were stuck in a rut of crumbling castles and cotton candy cobwebs. It was time for an update; to rid the screen of the stagecoaches and street lamps. It was time for Count Yorga, Vampire (1970), a fun little romp brought into the modern age by a world class turn from Robert Quarry as the titular bloodsucker.

Yorga was released by American International Pictures (we’re back in Aip territory – and it’s a glorious place to be) in June stateside, with a rollout around the world shortly thereafter. But that wasn’t the easiest thing to do; the filmmakers had to submit Yorga a few times to the MPAA to achieve their desired rating – a Gp (equivalent to a PG at the time), which they eventually received. And wouldn’t you know it? The film was very successful, especially on the drive-in circuit.
See full article at DailyDead »
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