I Was a Teenage Werewolf (1957) - News Poster

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Drive-In Dust Offs: Horrors Of The Black Museum (1959)

If you were a kid or teenager in the ’50s or ’60s and dug horror and/or sci-fi, the chances were astronomically good that you were watching something from American International Pictures, aka Aip, home to hormonal werewolves, monsters, and other adolescent dilemmas. Add in British comedy makers Anglo-Amalgamated Productions (the Carry On series of films) to the mix, and you probably ended up watching Horrors of the Black Museum (1959), a wry and dry romp highlighted by Michael Gough's (Sleepy Hollow) delightful performance.

Released stateside at the end of April with a rollout in the UK the following month, Horrors of the Black Museum actually made some good coin; Aip added a 13-minute prologue featuring a hypnotist (filmed in Hypno-Vista, ooh) to the American release to draw people in (although completely disconnected from the narrative of the film), and it worked, gimmick and all. Hooray for showbiz! Despite the tacked-on hucksterism,
See full article at DailyDead »

Wolf (All-Region)

Aooowww — Woo! Jack Nicholson summons his inner dog — and dons the makeup and scary contact lenses — to go the Larry Talbot route. Unfortunately, his moon-howling nighttime life isn’t as interesting as the dog-eat-dog infighting in the publishing house where he works – where feral instincts and sharp lupine senses are a major aid to ‘getting a leg up’ on the competition. I know, cheap metaphors are the ruin of promising writers.

Wolf

All-Region Blu-ray

Indicator

1994 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 125 min. / Street Date November 20, 2017 / £14.99

Starring: Jack Nicholson, Michelle Pfeiffer, James Spader, Kate Nelligan, Christopher Plummer, Richard Jenkins, Eileen Atkins, David Hyde Pierce, Om Puri, Ron Rifkin, Prunella Scales, David Schwimmer, Michael Raynor.

Cinematography: Giuseppe Rotunno

Film Editor: Sam O’Steen

Production Design: Bo Welch, Jim Dultz

Makeup Effects: Rick Baker

Original Music: Ennio Morricone

Written by Jim Harrison, Wesley Strick

Produced by Douglas Wick

Directed by Mike Nichols

I think my mother
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Ten Terrible Movie Taglines

  • Cinelinx
Good movies tend to have solid taglines. Bad movies almost always have questionable taglines. Coincidence?

Taglines may not be the most important component of a film’s advertising, but having a good one can be beneficial. A good tagline should be something that is memorable, catchy, informative of the films’ plot or tone, and unique. Consider the tagline from Alien, “In space no one will hear you scream,” or Jurassic Park, “An adventure 65 million years in the making.” At other times, movie taglines have been famous quotes from the film. Examples are “One ring to rule them all,” from Peter Jackson’s Lord of the Rings films, or “All work and no play make Jack a dull boy,” from The Shining. Simply put, having a solid movie tagline is worth the effort.

This is a look at a few films where the effort was clearly lacking or misplaced. Sometimes they are trying too hard.
See full article at Cinelinx »

Crime of Passion

Witness the ‘fifties transformation of the femme fatale, from scheming murderess to self-deluding social climber. Barbara Stanwyck redefines herself once again in Gerd Oswald’s best-directed picture, a searing portrayal of needs and anxieties in the nervous decade. With fine support from Raymond Burr, Virginia Grey and Royal Dano.

Crime of Passion

Blu-ray

ClassicFlix

1957 / B&W / 1:85 widescreen / 84 min. / Street Date September 5, 2017 /

Starring: Barbara Stanwyck, Sterling Hayden, Raymond Burr, Fay Wray, Virginia Grey, Royal Dano.

Cinematography: Joseph Lashelle

Art Direction: Leslie Thomas

Original Music: Paul Dunlap

Original Story and Screenplay by Jo Eisinger

Produced by Herman Cohen, Robert Goldstein

Directed by Gerd Oswald

A key title in the development of the Film Noir, 1957’s Crime of Passion shows how much the style had departed from the dark romanticism and expressive visuals of the previous decade. The best mid-’50s noirs strike a marvelously cynical and existentially bleak attitude regarding crime and society.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

We Had an Amazing Superhero Series in the 80s and We Didn’t Even Know It! Highway To Heaven

When I was growing up, there was a show that I loved to watch called Highway to Heaven. It had been years since I had seen the show, then it recently popped up on Netflix and I immediately started rewatching it.

As I watched the show, I was flooded with nostalgia and the memories of the show started flooding back. The show was filled with hard-hitting drama, humor, inspiration, and even action in some cases. One of the things I loved about the series most was the positive heartfelt messages that each episode revolves around.

Most episodes stressed moral themes and dealt with common human failings, such as egotism, bitterness and greed. Other episodes addressed such topics as racism, bullying, Mental illness, self-esteem, the environment, cancer, and more. There are also some big stars that got their start in the series like Paul Walker, Will Wheaton, and Josh Brolin. It
See full article at GeekTyrant »

Kenny Miller, Actor in 'I Was a Teenage Werewolf,' Dies at 85

Kenny Miller, Actor in 'I Was a Teenage Werewolf,' Dies at 85
Kenny Miller, who appeared in the 1950s drive-in classics I Was a Teenage Werewolf and Attack of the Puppet People, has died. He was 85.

Miller died Monday of pneumonia at Desert Regional Medical Center in Palm Springs, his friend and former publicist, Nancy Streebeck, told The Hollywood Reporter.

Miller was attacked by Michael Landon, played the bongos and sang "Eeny, Meeny, Miny Mo" in I Was a Teenage Werewolf (1957) and was one of the shrunken victims of a deranged doll-maker (John Hoyt) in Attack of the Puppet People (1958). Both low-budget films...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Kenny Miller, Actor in 'I Was a Teenage Werewolf,' Dies at 85

Kenny Miller, who appeared in the 1950s drive-in classics I Was a Teenage Werewolf and Attack of the Puppet People, has died. He was 85.

Miller died Monday of pneumonia at Desert Regional Medical Center in Palm Springs, his friend and former publicist, Nancy Streebeck, told The Hollywood Reporter.

Miller was attacked by Michael Landon, played the bongos and sang "Eeny, Meeny, Miny Mo" in I Was a Teenage Werewolf (1957) and was one of the shrunken victims of a deranged doll-maker (John Hoyt) in Attack of the Puppet People (1958). Both low-budget films...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - TV News »

Seddok, L’erede di Satana (Atom Age Vampire)

Seddok, l’erede di Satana (Atom Age Vampire)

Region 2 Pal DVD

Terminal Video Italia Srl

1960 / B&W / 1:66 flat letterbox / 103 min. / Street Date June 12, 2011 / available through Amazon.it / Eur 6,64

Starring: Alberto Lupo, Ivo Garrani, Susanne Loret, Sergio Fantoni, Rina Franchetti, Franca Parisi, Roberto Bertea.

Cinematography: Aldo Giordani

Film Editor: Gabrielle Varriale

Makeup Effects: Euclide Santoli

Original Music: Armando Trovajoli

Written by: Gino De Santis, Alberto Bevilacqua, Anton Giulio Majano; story by Piero Monviso

Produced by: Elio Ippolito Mellino (as Mario Fava)

Directed by Anton Giulio Majano

Let me herewith take a break from new discs to review an Italian release from six years ago, a movie that for years we knew only as Atom Age Vampire. Until sporadic late- night TV showings appeared, it existed for us ’60s kids as one or two interesting photos in Famous Monsters magazine. Forry Ackerman steered away from adult films, with the effect that
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Nightmare Presents: I Was a Teenage Werewolf by Dale Bailey

Happy December! It’s time for some brand new fiction from Nightmare Magazine. This month’s selection is “I Was a Teenage Werewolf” by Dale Bailey, and if you prefer listening to reading, there’s also a podcast version of the story you… Continue Reading →

The post Nightmare Presents: I Was a Teenage Werewolf by Dale Bailey appeared first on Dread Central.
See full article at Dread Central »

Stunning Original Production Art from the 1966 Batman Series

I love the 1966 series Batman with Adam West and Burt Ward. It was just such an incredibly entertaining and campy show. I especially enjoyed the look of it. The costumes and the sets had just such a fun design to them.

Today we've got some awesome original production art to share with you from the series created by A. Leslie Thomas, who was a Hollywood art director who worked on 1950s horror films such as I was a Teenage Werewolf and Blood of Dracula.

The art recently resurfaced on Batgirl Bat-Trap, and it gives us a cool behind-the-scenes look at the work that went into creating this colorful world of Batman in the 60s. As you'll see, the artwork is stunning!

Via: Cbr
See full article at GeekTyrant »

Blu-ray Review: Zombie High

  • DailyDead
High schools have seen their share of monsters in the movies, be they werewolves (Teen Wolf, I Was a Teenage Werewolf, Ginger Snaps), vampires (Twilight, My Best Friend is a Vampire), aliens (The Faculty), or just your average, garden-shear variety slasher (Prom Night, Scream, etc.). You might think that the 1987 horror film Zombie High attempts to bring the undead to the high school hallway. You would be wrong. For proof, check out Scream Factory’s new Blu-ray of Zombie High, which isn’t really a zombie movie and is barely even a horror film.

Virginia Madsen plays Andrea, a young woman who transfers to an elite boarding school against the wishes of her jock boyfriend, Barry (James Wilder). Once there, she begins to realize that things aren’t quite as they seem. Her friends (including Sherilyn Fenn, Scott Coffey and a pre-Freaks & Geeks Paul Feig) are transforming from cool, rebellious
See full article at DailyDead »

War-Gods of the Deep

In the history of soggy underwater adventures, none have been been soggier than this A.I.P. Panavision curiosity from England. Four out of five insomniacs agree: it has the most awkwardly mis-matched cast of players in fantasy film history... starting with a chicken. Kl Studio Classics Savant Blu-ray Review 1965 / Color / 2:35 widescreen 1:37 flat Academy / 84 min. / City in the Sea / Street Date August ll, 2015 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95  Starring Vincent Price, Tab Hunter, David Tomlinson, Susan Hart, John Le Mesurier, Harry Oscar, Derek Newark, Roy Patrick, Herbert the Rooster. Cinematography Stephen Dade Film Editor Gordon Hales Original Music Stanley Black Written by Charles Bennett, Louis M. Heyward, David Whitaker based on City in the Sea by Edgar Allan Poe Produced by Daniel Haller Directed by Jacques Tourneur

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

By 1965 American-International Pictures was looking in all directions, trying to hit on new themes to replace the monsters
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Drive-In Dust Offs: The Beast Within

The horror landscape was changing by 1982. People were tiring of slashers; even the Halloween franchise decided to take a left (some would say wrong) turn away from Shatner masks and sharpened knives, and used the brand name to explore the holiday itself in the perpetually under-appreciated Season of The Witch. The genre seemed to be turning towards monsters, from large scale dread fests such as John Carpenter's The Thing to more intimate fare like Frank Henenlotter's Basket Case. The horror films of 1982 displayed a refreshing variety of ways to make audiences jump, squirm, gasp, smile, and when the occasion arose, vomit. The Beast Within giddily checks all the boxes.

Released in February by United Artists, the film took in a total of 7.7 million at the box office. Those were not great numbers, and the reviews were worse. Mainstream critics in general have never been kind to horror; almost
See full article at DailyDead »

Get Down With Vince Ripper’s I Was a Teenage Werewolf

Around these parts we appreciate fine horror-themed music. Such is the case with Vince Ripper and the Rodent Show from the UK, who just put out their CD entitled It’s Fun to Be a Monster. That’s right, kids! It’s Goth… Continue Reading →

The post Get Down With Vince Ripper’s I Was a Teenage Werewolf appeared first on Dread Central.
See full article at Dread Central »

The fall and rise of the werewolf in cinema

With WolfCop out now on disc, Ryan takes a look at how werewolf myths have faded in and out of cinema history...

It might seem strange, from our interconnected, know-it-all 21st century perspective, that people really did once believe that werewolves existed. Legends of wolf-men date back to antiquity, but really began to bite into society’s fear centres in Europe of the Middle Ages.

Take, for example, Peter Stumpp, a 16th century man whose strange story was related in a pamphlet published shortly after his death. A resident of a small town in Cologne, Stumpp claimed to have been given a belt of wolf skin by the Devil, which when worn, gave him the ability to transform into a wolf. In this form, Stumpp said he’d killed and eaten a dozen or so people over the course of 25 years - crimes described in grisly detail in that old pamphlet.
See full article at Den of Geek »

Ti West Moonlights on Trailers from Hell for 'Teen Wolf'

Ti West Moonlights on Trailers from Hell for 'Teen Wolf'
1985's "Teen Wolf" flips the similarly themed "I Was a Teenage Werewolf" on its head. Instead of the heavy breathing psychodrama of Michael Landon’s tortured teen, we’re treated to a family-friendly comedy where Michael Fox’s lycanthropic curse is used as a metaphor for self-empowerment. Director Rod Daniel’s film was a modest success leading to a sequel, a cartoon show and a live-action series that debuted in 2011 and is still running.
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Teen Wolf

1985′s Teen Wolf flips the similarly themed I Was a Teenage Werewolf on its head. Instead of the heavy breathing psychodrama of Michael Landon’s tortured teen, we’re treated to a family-friendly comedy where Michael Fox’s lycanthropic curse is used as a metaphor for self-empowerment. Director Rod Daniel’s film was a modest success leading to a sequel, a cartoon show and a live-action series that debuted in 2011 and is still running.

The post Teen Wolf appeared first on Trailers From Hell.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Horror Photog Joshua Hoffine Creates Monstrous Prom Photos

We told you over the weekend that horror photog Joshua Hoffine has joined Mezco's Living Dead Dolls art book project, and now we have a look at some work he did recently for Sony UK featuring a monster of a prom!

Hoffine has created some incredibly chilling works throughout his career, but we all need a little levity in our dark world of nightmares now and then, which is what Hoffine provided for Sony UK to show off their new full-frame Sony A7 camera.

Taking a step back from the blood and terrors of his usual works, Hoffine got a little cute on this one and decided to do a photo shoot that featured three iconic monsters of horror… at their prom! Hoffine teamed with frequent collaborator "Face/Off" champion J. Anthony Kosar, and together they brought the idea to life.

Check out all three of the photos below, and
See full article at Dread Central »

Network Announces New "British Film Line-up" Titles

  • CinemaRetro
Network Distributing is pleased to announce the next batch of titles within “The British Film” range which will be available in the UK later this year. Each feature once again benefits from a new transfer, an instant play facility and will be presented in special slim-line space-saving packaging. Some of the highlights from October are a documentary about the body narrated by Vanessa Redgrave with music from Roger Waters, more gems from the vaults from Ealing Studios, classic horror, British musicals and a courtroom drama starring Richard Attenborough.

7 October

The Body £9.99

Vanessa Redgrave and Frank Finlay narrate an intimate and innovative documentary from the seventies about the human body cut to music from Pink Floyd’s Roger Waters. Commentary by poet and playwright Adrian Mitchell.

The Final Programme £9.99

Cult director Robert Fuest’s dystopian sci-fi thriller. Robert Finch stars as Jerry Cornelius, a Nobel Prize winning physicist and playboy who
See full article at CinemaRetro »

31 Days of Horror (Werewolves): Michael Jackson’s ‘Thriller’ 30 Year Anniversary

Michael Jackson’s groundbreaking dance routines and unique vocals have influenced generations of musicians, dancers and entertainers for decades. He was one of entertainment’s greatest icons, and like most gifted individuals he was always pushing boundaries, reinventing himself, and testing his limits. The New York Times once described him as one of the six most famous people on the planet, but I’d like to up the ante by saying, he was the most famous person on the planet. Of his many achievements, Jackson helped elevate the music video, turning it into an art form with complex story lines, never-before-seen dance choreography, elaborate special effects and famous cameo appearances. And while he developed some of the greatest music videos of all time, it wasn’t always easy for him. At first Jackson struggled to receive coverage on MTV because he was African American. Pressure from CBS Records persuaded MTV
See full article at SoundOnSight »
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