Fiend Without a Face (1958) - News Poster

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From Hell It Came

You Axed for it, as Forry would say: the grade Z horror movie that launched a thousand bad puns is also an unbeatable party favorite. Idiotic island natives clash with condescending Anglo scientists, when a death curse initiates the hell- spawning of a horrifying, vengeance-seeking pagan demon-monster. Sounds great — but what we get is Tabonga, a walking rubber tree stump with knotholes for eyes and a permanent scowl on its teakwood face. The excellent, flawless scan allows us to appreciate the mighty Tabonga for what it is — absurd, lovable, awful.

From Hell it Came

Blu-ray

Warner Archive Collection

1957 / B&W / 1:78 widescreen / 71 min. / Street Date April 25, 2017 / available through the WBshop / 21.99

Starring: Tod Andrews, Tina Carver, Linda Watkins, John McNamara, Gregg Palmer, Suzanne Ridgeway.

Cinematography: Brydon Baker

Film Editor: Jack Milner

Original Music: Darrell Calker

Written by Richard Bernstein, Dan Milner

Produced by Jack Milner

Directed by Dan Milner

“You say Tomayto,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Horror Highlights: The Wraiths Of War Exclusive Excerpt, The Shelter, IFC’s Horror Marathons, 360 Degrees Of Hell, Slimer & Sloth Pins

  • DailyDead
The Wraiths of War hits shelves from Titan Books tomorrow, October 11th, so we encourage our readers to continue reading today's Highlights for an exclusive excerpt from Mark Morris' new novel. Also: a new trailer for The Shelter, IFC's "Wake Up and Smell the Evil" Marathon, 360 Degrees of Hell Vr experience, and photos / release details for the Slimer and Sloth pins.

Exclusive Excerpt from The Wraiths of War: Synopsis: "Alex Locke is desperately trying to hold onto the disparate threads of the complex web of time he has created. He travels to the First World War, living through the horrors of trench warfare in order to befriend a young soldier crucial to his story; then to the 1930s to uncover the secrets of a mysterious stage magician. He moves back and forth in time, always with the strange and terrifying Dark Man on his heels, gradually getting closer to
See full article at DailyDead »

Drive-In Dust Offs: Fiend Without A Face (1958)

  • DailyDead
In the 1950s, independent film was just as keen to stick its nose in the atomic blender as the Hollywood big boys. Of course, budget restrictions frequently left most of the monsters wanting, be they big or small. But sometimes a shot of quirk was enough to stand apart from the Tinseltown terrors. I give you Fiend Without a Face (1958), a low budget romp content with showing less until it has to show it all, with giddy results.

Produced by British company Amalgamated Productions and distributed by MGM (in the States), Fiend was sent out on a double bill with The Haunted Strangler, a Boris Karloff vehicle. With a combined budget of 130,000 pounds, the double feature brought in domestic and international receipts of over $ 650,000 dollars, filmic diplomacy at its finest.

Filmed in Britain but taking place in Winthrop (?), Manitoba, Canada (never heard of the town, and if I haven’t drank in it,
See full article at DailyDead »

A celebration of disembodied brains and heads in the movies

Ryan Lambie Jul 14, 2016

We take a look at some of the most memorable and freaky floating brains and flying heads in the history of cinema...

Nb: The following contains spoilers for The Brain From The Planet Arous and Prometheus.

For some reason we've yet to discover, cinema has, for decades, been home to all manner of sentient, disembodied heads and floating brains. Note that we’re not talking about decapitations here - though goodness knows that cinema is home to plenty of those, from Japanese samurai epics to modern slasher horrors.

No, we’re talking about movies where heads and brains remain sentient even when they’re stuffed into jars or colossal things made of stone. Sometimes used for comedic effect, at other times for shock value, they’re a surprisingly common phenomenon in the movies. Here, we celebrate a few of our absolute favourites - though you’re sure
See full article at Den of Geek »

Journey to the Seventh Planet

What horrors will we find on the planet Yoo-rah-nuss? A cyclopean dinosaur? Nasty spider monsters? A megalomaniac cerebellum that can turn our X-rated sex fantasies into flesh and blood people? Let's go! Sid Pink's flashy and slightly idiotic adventure stars space cadet John Agar as an average guy willing to have sex with a phantom from his own imagination. Say, doesn't Woody Allen make dirty jokes about that? Journey to the Seventh Planet Blu-ray Kl Studio Classics 1962 / Color / 1:66 widescreen / 77 min. / Street Date April 5, 2016 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95 Starring John Agar, Carl Ottosen, Ann Smyrner, Greta Thyssen, Peter Monch, Ove Sprogoe, Louis Miehe-Renard, Ulla Moritz, Mimi Heinrich, Annie Birgit Garde. Cinematography Aage Wiltrup Visual Effects Krogh, Wah Chang, Jim Danforth, Ronny Scheemmel. Art Director Otto Lund Editor Tove Palsbo Original Music Jerry Capeheart, Ib Glindemann, Mitchell Tableporte Written by Ib Melchior & Sid Pink Produced by Samuel Z. Arkoff & Sid Pink
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

How The Iron Giant influenced Guardians of the Galaxy and what it means for Tomorrowland

How The Iron Giant influenced Guardians of the Galaxy and what it means for Tomorrowland
Ever wondered where Guardians of the Galaxy director James Gunn got the gumption to voice-cast Vin Diesel as a space-beast whose body contains surprise weapons, an unexpectedly potent soul, and a propensity to make the ultimate sacrifice to save his friends?

Then look no further than Diesel's emotional titular performance in The Iron Giant - an animated spectacular that, if it didn't set the template for tender tree Groot, we'll eat our machine-gunning raccoon. And, with helmer Brad Bird's science-fiction epic Tomorrowland firing into cinemas on May 22, there's no better time to search it out.

But, frankly, you shouldn't need an excuse. The Iron Giant is the greatest Pixar movie the studio never made, a vivid combination of genuinely funny comedy, wonderfully observed characters, and rich attention to detail. Oh, and it's got so much heart it'd make a Terminator cry.

Released in 1999 by Warner Brothers, it's rarely mentioned
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

Top Ten Strangest Movie Monsters

There are monsters out there. Scary, big ones. And they’ll haunt our dreams and crawl on our bodies for eternity. Nothing will ever make us comfortable knowing they exist, even in fiction. Then, there are some that are just Goddamn ridiculous. Here are ten of such monsters.

The Fiend Without a Face (1958)

Though ultimately, they’re just crawling brains and spinal columns, the most interesting aspect of the fiends is their invisibility for the majority of the runtime as they slowly gain their terrifying form.

The Creeping Terror (1964)

A giant, moving rug. Due to the extremely low-budget, this largely-narrated alien invasion tale amounts to little more than a big, badly dilapidated wool rug laying on top of its victims.

Prophecy (1979)

John Frankenheimer’s nature-gone-wrong turns into more of a nature-film-gone-wrong and features a bizarre, giant fetus-like bear terrorizing a mountainside.

Murders in Rue Morgue (1932)

Robert Florey’s Universal picture
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Dawn of the Dead Historian Roy Frumkes Offers New Fiend Without a Face Update

We reported that Roy Frumkes (Document of the Dead, Street Trash) owned the rights to Arthur Crabtree's 1958 creature feature Fiend Without a Face way back in 2010. Finally an update on it and more has come.

"I’ve wanted to do this film for 40 years, so I already had it all in my head, and it wasn’t hard to write. What I didn’t have was the technical information; I’m no science buff. Now I’m interviewing scientists, getting the technology straight,” Frumkes tells Fango. "It’s set in a think tank in the Berkshires, and it’s not about young people. It’s a mature film, but it has a Street Trash sensibility, so the people who like my work will not be disappointed.”

The site also scored a still from a fund-raising trailer Frumkes shot for his Fiend flick with director Franco Frassetti, which features Ursula
See full article at Dread Central »

100 + Greatest Horror Movies (pt.3) 100-76

Throughout the month of October, Editor-in-Chief and resident Horror expert Ricky D, will be posting a list of his favorite Horror films of all time. The list will be posted in six parts. Click here to see every entry.

As with all lists, this is personal and nobody will agree with every choice – and if you do, that would be incredibly disturbing. It was almost impossible for me to rank them in order, but I tried and eventually gave up.

****

Special Mention: Gremlins

Directed by Joe Dante

Written by Chris Columbus

1984, USA

Gremlins gets a special mention because I’ve always considered it more of a comedy and a wholesome Christmas flick than an actual horror film. This tribute the 1950s matinee genre stands the test of time from a time when parents would take their children to family films that pushed the boundaries of the MPAA. Joe Dante is
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Daily Briefing. Radical America in 1980

  • MUBI
Catherine Grant's retweeted an intriguing find from Alternative Takes, the January/February 1980 issue of Radical America (Pdf). From the "Introduction": "Lynn Garafola's article, 'Hollywood and the Myth of the Working Class,' discusses such box office successes as Rocky, The Deer Hunter, Saturday Night Fever and Norma Rae, as well as some commercial productions that didn't do so well, such as Blue Collar and F.I.S.T. John Demeter's article, on the other hand, looks at two examples of a new class of technically advanced non-Hollywood left-wing movies: The Wobblies and Northern Lights. In a curious way, the Hollywood films that Garafola writes about are more political than the left-wing films."

For Bookforum, John Domini reviews Paolo Sorrentino's first novel, Everybody's Right, and finds that "this filmmaker's energetic wallow in prose does seem best appreciated as a cry for the beloved country, resonating off touchstones from
See full article at MUBI »

Richard Gordon obituary

Canny film producer known for his horror and sci-fi classics

The producer Richard Gordon, who has died aged 85, was involved with several offbeat classics of horror and science-fiction cinema. These included Arthur Crabtree's Fiend Without a Face (1958), which climaxes with a still-astonishing siege of a power station by disembodied, tentacled, malicious human brains, and Antony Balch's Horror Hospital (1973), a lively and perverse mad-scientist satire featuring Michael Gough and Robin Askwith.

It may be that Gordon and his brother, Alex, so closely associated that many reference sources mistakenly say they were twins, were the first people to take the now-common route from movie-crazed kid to industry professional, later the path of film-makers as different as Jean-Luc Godard and Steven Spielberg. As schoolboys, the Gordons founded a film society, then wrote for fan magazines and performed menial roles on low-budget productions, always motivated by a boundless enthusiasm for the films
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Horror Producer Gordon Dies

  • WENN
British movie producer Richard Gordon has died at the age of 85.

He passed away in New York last Tuesday after suffering longterm heart trouble.

Gordon relocated to the Big Apple after a two-year stint in the Royal Navy and set up his own production firm, Gordon Films, despite having no experience in the industry.

He learned the tricks of the trade by working alongside movie crewmembers and went on to produce more than 20 films, including cult horror hit Fiend Without a Face in 1958.

Daily Briefing. Jacques Rancière on Béla Tarr

  • MUBI
With The Turin Horse opening in France on November 30 and the Béla Tarr retrospective at the Centre Pompidou running from December 3 through January 2, Capricci will be releasing Jacques Rancière's Béla Tarr, le temps d'après on November 29.

David Lynch's new album, Crazy Clown Time (which, again, you can listen to in full at NPR for the time being), has the Guardian building an annex to its special section on Lynch, "David Lynch's Film&Music," wherein you'll find Xan Brooks's interview, Cath Clarke on the newly rediscovered 50 minutes of never-before-seen footage from Blue Velvet (they'll be "re-edited — supervised by Lynch — into an extra on a new DVD celebrating the film's 25th anniversary (available early next year in the UK)," Michael Hann listening in while Lynch and Zz Top's Billy Gibbons discuss "the beauty and power of industry" and more. Related listening: Lynch and 'Big' Dean Hurley's mixtape at Pitchfork.
See full article at MUBI »

Rip, Richard Gordon!

With thoughts from Tom Weaver on the producer of Devil Doll.

Prolific author and legendary film buff Tom Weaver has been a friend of Tfh since before we existed, and his essential series of book-length interviews with horror/sci fi filmmakers, writers and actors has mirrored what we try to do here at the site, which is disseminate information and opinions on the movies we all love.

Tom’s latest book examines the career of Devil Doll producer Richard Gordon, friend of both Karloff and Lugosi, one of the first fans-turned-pro and whose long career has finally ended. Richard was 85.[More about The Horror Hits of Richard Gordon here.]

Here’s Tom:

As Tim Lucas of Video Watchdog once pointed out, Steven Spielberg, George Lucas (etc.) are called the first people to have grown up movie nuts and then become moviemakers themselves, but Years before them came Alex and Richard Gordon, who loved movies as kids in England, belonged to fan clubs,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Horror Producer Richard Gordon Dead at 85

The man who teamed Boris Karloff and Christopher Lee together for the first time in 1958′s Corridors Of Blood and brought us the flying brains in Fiend Without A Face (1958) is gone. A great loss to the Horror Film community, Richard Gordon not only produced a string of beloved horror films in the ’50s, ’60s, and ’70s, but was a staple at conventions and a huge supporter of those who wrote on the subject of film. He produced his last film 30 years ago but his always-informative ‘letters to the editor’ to a variety of publications from small-time fan magazines up to the New York Times, offering corrections, and recollections, remain an enduring legacy for film fans.

Born in England, Gordon moved to the U.S. in 1947, and two years later, at age 23, he set up his own company Gordon Films, distributing imported films in the United States. Joined by writer Tom Weaver,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Retro Review: Invasion Earth – The Aliens Are Here

Invasion Earth: The Aliens Are Here

Stars: Janice Fabian, Christian Lee, Larry Bagby, Dana Young | Written by Miller Drake | Directed by Robert Skotak

Aliens invade a small town invading the towns cinema where the patrons are watching a sci-fi marathon. Taking over the projection room, the aliens splice together footage of old sci-fi films from the 50s to try an “bore” the audience into losing their minds so that they can take them over. A couple of teenagers in the audience realise that the alien threat is real and set out to put an end to the aliens plans before it’s too late.

Only really notable for being the one and only directorial effort from Robert Skotak, a visual effects whiz who has worked on such films as Tremors, Darkman, Terminator 2 and more recently Joe Dante’s The Hole, Invasion Earth: The Aliens Are Here isn’t really a movie,
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Cinema’s 10 greatest disembodied brains and heads

We provide a rundown of ten of the most memorable and freaky floating brains and flying heads in the history of cinema...

For some reason I've yet to discover, cinema has, for decades, been home to all manner of sentient, disembodied heads and floating brains. From massive flying stone heads to telekinetic, evil brains from other planets, this list is devoted to the most memorable instances of this peculiar movie phenomenon...

The Brain From The Planet Arous (1957)

It's been several years since I've seen the sci-fi B-movie, The Brain From Planet Arous, but one thing is still clear in my mind: that it features a large disembodied alien brain, a criminal brain, no less, that comes to Earth to control the population with its psychic powers.

The brain, called Gor, seizes control of Steve, a nuclear scientist, who becomes a randy "regular caveman" under the alien's influence. With Steve as his puppet,
See full article at Den of Geek »

Cinema’s 10 greatest disemembodied brains and heads

We provide a rundown of ten of the most memorable and freaky floating brains and flying heads in the history of cinema...

For some reason I've yet to discover, cinema has, for decades, been home to all manner of sentient, disembodied heads and floating brains. From massive flying stone heads to telekinetic, evil brains from other planets, this list is devoted to the most memorable instances of this peculiar movie phenomenon...

The Brain From The Planet Arous (1957)

It's been several years since I've seen the sci-fi B-movie, The Brain From Planet Arous, but one thing is still clear in my mind: that it features a large disembodied alien brain, a criminal brain, no less, that comes to Earth to control the population with its psychic powers.

The brain, called Gor, seizes control of Steve, a nuclear scientist, who becomes a randy "regular caveman" under the alien's influence. With Steve as his puppet,
See full article at Den of Geek »

Looking back at the BBC’s Moviedrome

Ryan salutes the BBC2 series Moviedrome, which for 12 years introduced a plethora of cult films to unsuspecting UK audiences…

For better or worse, I have Alex Cox to thank for my enduring appetite for film. In the late 80s and early 90s, when I was still at school and the Internet was still the preserve of the rich and the Us military, the BBC2 series Moviedrome introduced me, and I suspect a legion of other impressionable youngsters, into the fascinating alternate world of obscure or low-budget movies.

Beginning in 1988, director Alex Cox introduced a series of cult and exploitation movies, commencing with Robin Hardy's folk horror, The Wicker Man. Before long, Sunday nights became an oasis of the weird and the sensational, and as a youth still watching cartoons like Transformers and Thundercats, films like Invasion Of The Body Snatchers and The Fly seemed like startling broadcasts from another universe.
See full article at Den of Geek »

Fred Fetes a Fiend Without a Face

Fred Fetes a Fiend Without a Face
By Fred Burdsall

Fiend Without a Face first started out as a story that appeared in Weird Tales (possibly the best fantasy/horror fiction magazine ever) back in 1930 as “The Thought Monster” by Amelia Reynolds Long. The film’s director, Arthur Crabtree, also gave us Horrors of the Black Museum in 1959.

A lone sentry on patrol hears a crunching, slurping sound in the woods and goes to investigate. A farmer out checking on his cows in the early morning is attacked and the sentry arrives seconds later to find a dead man and no sign of the killer. Official cause of death: Heart Failure. The Air Force wants to do an autopsy but his daughter, Barbara (Kim Parker), won’t allow it and hands the body over to the local authorities.

The Adams farm comes under attack and the old couple die as horribly as Farmer Griselle did. The Air
See full article at Famous Monsters of Filmland »
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