The Teahouse of the August Moon (1956) - News Poster

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15 White Actors Miscast in Non-White Roles, From Mickey Rooney to Emma Stone (Photos)

  • The Wrap
15 White Actors Miscast in Non-White Roles, From Mickey Rooney to Emma Stone (Photos)
Rooney as Japanese? Stone as native Hawaiian? TheWrap looks at history of racially misguided castings Katharine Hepburn in “Dragon Seed” (1944) Caucasian Hepburn played a Chinese woman in this big-screen adaptation of the Pearl S. Buck novel. Marlon Brando in “The Teahouse of the August Moon” (1956) Brando starred as an Okinawan translator for the U.S. Army in this comedy about the American occupation of the island nation. John Wayne in “Conquerer” (1956) Wayne was cast as Mongol conquerer Genghis Khan in what’s considered by many to be one of the worst films of all time. Charlton Heston in “Touch of Evil
See full article at The Wrap »

The contender, part 2 by Anne-Katrin Titze

Stevan Riley's look at Marlon Brando in Listen to Me Marlon: "Art was often paralleling his life. Guys and Dolls reflected his need for levity."

At the Sundance premiere, James Franco, Jane Fonda and Lily Tomlin attended screenings of Stevan Riley's Listen To Me Marlon. In New York, Stevan and I discussed Marlon Brando's self-hypnosis tapes, political involvement, lying for a living and his ability to be a mimic in films such as The Teahouse Of The August Moon, The Godfather, Mutiny On The Bounty, The Young Lions, Viva Zapata! and Sayonara.

A soft wind blows and Marlon hypnotises himself back to a time when he was very young, walking down the sidewalk in Omaha or sitting in the shade of an old oak tree. If only his mother hadn't been "the town drunk" and if only he didn't hate his father so much, this could have been paradise.
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

The contender, part 1 by Anne-Katrin Titze

Marlon Brando

What do Francis Ford Coppola's The Godfather and Apocalypse Now, Bernardo Bertolucci's Last Tango In Paris, Elia Kazan's A Streetcar Named Desire, On the Waterfront, and Viva Zapata!, Daniel Mann's The Teahouse Of The August Moon, Edward Dmytryk's The Young Lions, Gillo Pontecorvo's Burn!, Lewis Milestone's Mutiny On The Bounty, Guys And Dolls directed by Joseph L. Mankiewicz and One-Eyed Jacks have in common? Brando the movie star in Stevan Riley's documentary, Listen To Me Marlon, becomes Marlon, the man.

After a conversation with Parabellum director Lukas Valenta Rinner at New Directors/New Films, I met up with Stevan at Lincoln Center.

"Brando was himself fascinated by these same topics of truth and lies, of myth and fantasy and reality."

Hundreds of hours of Brando's audio recordings had gone unheard until Riley took his pick and put together this fascinating portrait.
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Eli Wallach, 'The Good, The Bad and The Ugly' Actor, Dies At 98

Iconic stage and screen star Eli Wallach, known for performances in The Good, the Bad and the Ugly and The Magnificent Seven, died Tuesday. He was 98.

Eli Wallach Dies

Wallach’s death was confirmed by a family member to CNN.

Over the course of his storied career, Wallach accumulated more that 150 film credits. In addition to 60s Westerns The Magnificent Seven and The Good, the Bad and the Ugly, he starred in The Misfits, Lord Jim, Tour Guys, The Two Jakes, The Godfather: Part III and The Holiday. His last major motion picture was 2013’s Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps.

Among the Hollywood elite Wallach starred alongside were Clint Eastwood, Marilyn Monroe, Clark Gable, Kirk Douglas, Jack Nicholson and Kate Winslet.

Though film paid the bills, Wallach’s passion was the theatre. “For actors, movies are a means to an end," Wallach told The New York Times in 1973. "I go
See full article at Uinterview »

Movie Poster of the Week: “The Golden Coach” and the Early Posters of Waldemar Swierzy

I recently watched a short documentary by Andrea Marks called Freedom on the Fence. Made in 2009, and only 40 minutes long, it is a nice introduction to the world of Polish movie posters which concisely explains the particular set of circumstances that gave rise to the incredible flowering of creativity that was the Polish poster of the 1950s and 60s. An audio interview with Henryk Tomaszewski, the father of the modern Polish poster, explains how the systematic destruction of Warsaw by the retreating Nazis in 1945, which left 80% of the city in ruins, gave rise to a landscape of rubble and fences which basically created an open-air art gallery for posters.

At the same time, at the end of the war, there was a six year backlog of American and other foreign cinema that was waiting to be seen in Poland. Tomaszewski remembers being told by the woman in charge of film
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DGA Awards vs. Academy Awards: Odd Men Out Jack Clayton, David Lean, Stanley Donen

Katharine Hepburn, Rossano Brazzi in Oscar nominee (but not DGA nominee) David Lean's Summertime DGA Awards vs. Academy Awards 1948-1952: Odd Men Out George Cukor, John Huston, Vincente Minnelli 1953 DGA (12) Melvin Frank and Norman Panama, Above and Beyond Walter Lang, Call Me Madam Daniel Mann, Come Back, Little Sheba Joseph L. Mankiewicz, Julius Caesar Henry Koster, The Robe Jean Negulesco, Titanic George Sidney, Young Bess DGA/AMPAS George Stevens, Shane Charles Walters, Lili Billy Wilder, Stalag 17 William Wyler, Roman Holiday Fred Zinnemann, From Here to Eternity   1954 DGA (16) Edward Dmytryk, The Caine Mutiny Alfred Hitchcock, Dial M for Murder Robert Wise, Executive Suite Anthony Mann, The Glenn Miller Story Samuel Fuller, Hell and High Water Henry King, King of Khyber Rifles Melvin Frank and Norman Panama, Knock on Wood Don Siegel, Riot in Cell Block 11 Stanley Donen, Seven Brides for Seven Brothers George Cukor, A Star Is Born Jean Negulesco,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

On The Road Letter: Jack Kerouac Wanted Marlon Brando for Dean; Kerouac Would Play Sal

On the Road's Neal Cassady, Jack Kerouac "I'm praying that you'll buy On the Road and make a movie of it. Don't worry about structure. I know how to compress and re-arrange the plot to give it perfectly acceptable movie-type structure: making it into an all-inclusive trip instead of several voyages coast-to-coast in the book…" That's from a 1957 letter from Florida resident Jack Kerouac to Marlon Brando (photo), which was recently sold for $33,600 at a Christie's auction. Brando was then a box-office friendly and critically respected Oscar winner following star vehicles such as On the Waterfront (critical respect) and The Teahouse of the August Moon (box-office clout). In fact, in '57 Brando was starring in Joshua Logan's Sayonara, a mammoth box-office hit — and his last major success until The Godfather fifteen years later. Kerouac, sounding like a starstruck (and ambitious) fan, explains his invitation in the letter: "I
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Harry Morgan, 1915 - 2011

  • MUBI
"Harry Morgan, the prolific character actor best known for playing the acerbic but kindly Colonel Potter in the long-running television series M*A*S*H, died on Wednesday morning at his home in Los Angeles," reports Michael Pollak in the New York Times. "In more than 100 movies, Mr Morgan played Western bad guys, characters with names like Rocky and Shorty, loyal sidekicks, judges, sheriffs, soldiers, thugs and police chiefs…. In The Ox-Bow Incident (1943), which starred Henry Fonda, he was praised for his portrayal of a drifter caught up in a lynching in a Western town…. He went on to appear in All My Sons (1948), based on the Arthur Miller play, with Edward G Robinson and Burt Lancaster; The Big Clock (1948), in which he played a silent, menacing bodyguard to Charles Laughton; Yellow Sky (1949), with Gregory Peck and Anne Baxter; and the critically praised western High Noon (1952), with Gary Cooper. Among
See full article at MUBI »

John Forsythe obituary

American TV actor famous for his role as Dynasty's Blake Carrington and being the voice of Charlie in Charlie's Angels

If the name of the American actor John Forsythe, who has died aged 92, is not immediately recognisable, then that of his character Blake Carrington – the tanned and handsome silver-haired billionaire oil magnate in the long-running television series Dynasty – certainly is. The show, known for its opulent atmosphere, lavish sets and costumes, and preoccupation with the problems of the wealthy, ran alongside Ronald Reagan's years as Us president, 1981-89. It made Forsythe internationally famous and rich. During the second year of the run, Forsythe remarked: "I can't afford to bulge. Being a 64-year-old sex symbol is a hell of a weight to carry."

With his earnest demeanour, Forsythe, as the patriarch plagued by a scheming ex-wife (Joan Collins), a bisexual son, and other tribulations ranging from murder and greed to lust and incest,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

John Forsythe obituary

American TV actor famous for his role as Dynasty's Blake Carrington and being the voice of Charlie in Charlie's Angels

If the name of the American actor John Forsythe, who has died aged 92, is not immediately recognisable, then that of his character Blake Carrington – the tanned and handsome silver-haired billionaire oil magnate in the long-running television series Dynasty – certainly is. The show, known for its opulent atmosphere, lavish sets and costumes, and preoccupation with the problems of the wealthy, ran alongside Ronald Reagan's years as Us president, 1981-89. It made Forsythe internationally famous and rich. During the second year of the run, Forsythe remarked: "I can't afford to bulge. Being a 64-year-old sex symbol is a hell of a weight to carry."

With his earnest demeanour, Forsythe, as the patriarch plagued by a scheming ex-wife (Joan Collins), a bisexual son, and other tribulations ranging from murder and greed to lust and incest,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Eddie Albert Dies at 99

Eddie Albert Dies at 99
Eddie Albert, the versatile actor forever associated with the classic TV comedy Green Acres, died Thursday of pneumonia at his home in California; he was 99. Although he made his screen debut in 1938 and appeared in a number of films, Albert's film career took off considerably after his service in World War II, and in the 50s he embarked on a career that consisted primarily of acclaimed supporting roles in a variety of films, usually as the sidekick to the star. He was the photographer who tagged along with Gregory Peck and Audrey Hepburn in Roman Holiday (a role which earned him an Oscar nomination), played a cowardly army officer in Attack!, and provided comic relief as Ali Hakim in Oklahoma; other notable films in the 50s included I'll Cry Tomorrow, The Teahouse of the August Moon, and The Sun Also Rises. In 1965, though, Albert ascended to leading man status as the hero of the sitcom Green Acres, in which he played a New York attorney who yearned for the country life, and dragged his glamorous wife (Eva Gabor) to the tiny, eccentric town of Hooterville. His duet with Gabor of the show's title song was enough to earn him a place in pop culture history, but Albert continued to work practically non-stop after the show ended in 1971. As he aged, Albert also played more menacing, morally questionable characters, and earned a second Oscar nomination for The Heartbreak Kid, playing Cybill Shepherd's intimidating father. Though a number of the films and TV shows he appeared in were decidedly B-level, Albert always brought a sense of class and grace to his parts, whether they were dramatic or comedic. Albert is survived by his son, actor Edward Albert, a daughter, and two granddaughters. --Prepared by IMDb staff

Nicholson's Final Tribute to Dead Pal Brando

Nicholson's Final Tribute to Dead Pal Brando
Veteran actor Jack Nicholson has written an emotional obituary for his pal, mentor and neighbor Marlon Brando in the new Rolling Stone magazine. The actor, who lived next door to Brando's Mulholland Drive compound, admits in the piece that Brando has been "my idol all my professional life." Nicholson states of his friend, "He had this extraordinary physical beauty and a power that was hard to define but completely undeniable... The movie audience just knew that he was it." The actor also recalls the first time he came face to face with Brando, who he compares to his favorite artist Pablo Picasso, on the MGM studio lot. He remembers, "When Marlon came on the lot, you should have seen those Venetian blinds flying up in the air and those secretaries sticking their heads out the window. This man was a true sensation." Nicholson actually sneaked onto The Teahouse Of The August Moon set to watch his hero. He reveals, "On that picture, the crew had these smocks and kimonos to identify them, so it took me a little work to sneak in there and watch him. But nothing could have stopped me from watching Marlon Brando up close." In the obituary, Nicholson also regrets that everyone focused on his pal's weight issues in the last decade of his life - and not his greatness. He adds, "It disturbs me that toward the end, all some people could speak about was his weight... What Mr. Brando does for a living ain't done by the pound."

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