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Paul De Rolf, Choreographer for 'Petticoat Junction' and Spielberg's '1941,' Dies at 74

Paul De Rolf, Choreographer for 'Petticoat Junction' and Spielberg's '1941,' Dies at 74
Paul De Rolf, the choreographer, dancer and actor best known for his work on The Seven Little Foys, The Ten Commandments, Petticoat Junction and Steven Spielberg's 1941 has died, The Hollywood Reporter has learned. He was 74.

De Rolf passed away on Thursday in Australia from Alzheimer's disease.

De Rolf acted opposite Bob Hope in The Seven Little Foys and as a young boy he played the role of Moses' nephew Eleazar for Cecil B. DeMille's The Ten Commandments.

In addition to 1941 and Petticoat Junction, his choreography credits include The Karate Kid II and The Beverly Hillbillies series (which...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

When did actors stop doing their own dancing?

Movie stars should earn their spurs in vaudeville, then next time a Black Swan comes around, the lead can do her own fouettés

Much as I enjoyed Black Swan (tutus, blood, evil ids – what's not to like?), I thought it was a shame Natalie Portman couldn't do all her own dancing. Don't get me wrong – the girl done good. She nailed the bun, achieved a creditable facsimile of the neurotic thoroughbred physique, and managed Ok with the expressive arm-flapping.

But anyone can dance with her arms. What I would call the "proper dancing" had to be performed by a professional with Portman's face overlaid using CGI. It's not her fault she didn't have the technique; she's an actress, not a ballerina. To pull off the highlight of the Odette/Odile double-role – the 32 fouettés en tournant – you would need to have practised 25 hours a day, from birth, on a diet of Silk Cut,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Legendary Entertainer Bob Hope Dies at 100

Legendary Entertainer Bob Hope Dies at 100
Bob Hope, beloved comedian, actor, emcee, ambassador, and emissary, passed away last night (7/27) at his home in Toluca Lake. He had turned 100 on May 29th. Hope starred in over 60 movies and his success spanned vaudeville, radio, television, and the big screen. Hope, along with Bing Crosby and Dorothy Lamour, starred in the popular "Road to.." movies as well as headlining such films as The Seven Little Foys, The Paleface, and The Great Lover. On the small screen during the '60s and '70s, Hope's Christmas and comedy specials were a treasured staple, expanding on the formula of girls and gags from his U.S.O. tours. It's for these tours, particularly during World War II, the Korean war, and Vietnam war, that Hope endeared himself to U.S. servicemen and for which, in 1997, Hope was awarded the status of "Honorary Veteran" by the U.S. Congress. No other civilian holds the honor. Thanks for the memories, Bob. --Prepared by IMDb staff

Legendary Entertainer Bob Hope Dies at 100

Bob Hope, beloved comedian, actor, emcee, ambassador, and emissary, passed away last night (7/27) at his home in Toluca Lake. He had turned 100 on May 29th. Hope starred in over 60 movies and his success spanned vaudeville, radio, television, and the big screen. Hope, along with Bing Crosby and Dorothy Lamour, starred in the popular "Road to.." movies as well as headlining such films as The Seven Little Foys, The Paleface, and The Great Lover. On the small screen during the '60s and '70s, Hope's Christmas and comedy specials were a treasured staple, expanding on the formula of girls and gags from his U.S.O. tours. It's for these tours, particularly during World War II, the Korean war, and Vietnam war, that Hope endeared himself to U.S. servicemen and for which, in 1997, Hope was awarded the status of "Honorary Veteran" by the U.S. Congress. No other civilian holds the honor. Thanks for the memories, Bob. --Prepared by IMDb staff

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