The Robe (1953) - News Poster

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Peyton Place

The book was raw & dirty, and did you read what that girl did with that guy on page 167? Racking up a stack of Oscar nominations, Peyton Place became one of the big hits of its year, launched the careers of several young actors, and proved that Hollywood could pasteurize most any so-called un-filmable book. Lana Turner is the nominal star but the leading actress is Diane Varsi, in her film debut.

Peyton Place

Blu-ray

Twilight Time

1957 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 157 min. / Street Date March 14, 2017 / Available from the Twilight Time Movies Store 29.95

Starring: Lana Turner, Hope Lange, Arthur Kennedy, Lloyd Nolan, Lee Philips, Terry Moore, Russ Tamblyn, Betty Field, David Nelson, Leon Ames, Mildred Dunnock.

Cinematography William Mellor

Art Direction Jack Martin Smith, Lyle R. Wheeler

Film Editor David Bretherton

Original Music Franz Waxman

Written by John Michael Hayes from the book by Grace Metalious

Produced by Jerry Wald

Directed by Mark Robson

What’s this,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

5 Days Until Oscar. 5 Timer Men

Jimmy Stewart holding the wrong number of fingers up for our exercise!We're so close to the big show. Voting ends Today. And then it's all over but the big night (and recapping and contemplating celebratory madness). For today's trivia item with the number 5, a random sampling of men... stepping away from the ladies for a minute. (gasp)

Five time male winners

John Barry (composer, Dances with Wolves, Out of Africa, Born Free, etc)

Johnny Green (composer on lots of musicals)

Fred Hynes (sound on lots of musicals)

Dennis Murren (visual fx: Terminator 2, Innerspace, The Abyss, etc)

Edward Selzer (animated short films: Speedy Gonzalez, Sylvester & Tweety shorts, etc)

Lyle Wheeler (art direction: The King and I, The Robe, The Diary of Anne Frank, etc)

John Williams (composer: Star Wars, Schindler's List, etc)

Francis Ford Coppola (writer/director/producer: The Godfather, etc)

Actoriffic-ness after the jump.
See full article at FilmExperience »

Hail, Caesar!

Not funny enough, or too hip for the house? I found the Coen Bros.' send-up of old-fashioned movie madness good fun, with some great new actors. If you like droll comedy combined with spot-on recreations of old movie genres, this show can't lose. And there has to be somebody out there who wants to see George Clooney in a skirt. Hail, Caesar! Blu-ray + DVD + Digital HD Universal Pictures Home Entertainment 2016 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 106 min. / Street Date June 7, 2016 / 34.98 Starring Josh Brolin, George Clooney, Alden Ehrenreich, Ralph Fiennes, Jonah Hill, Scarlett Johansson, Tilda Swinton, Frances McDormand, Channing Tatum, Veronica Osorio, Heather Goldenhersh, Max Baker, Clancy Brown, Fisher Stevens, Patick Fischler, Robert Picardo, Christopher Lambert, Robert Trebor, Michael Gambon (voice), Dolph Lundgren. Cinematography Roger Deakins Film Editors Ethan and Joel Coen Original Music Carter Burwell Produced by Tim Bevan, Ethan and Joel Coen, Eric Fellner Written and Directed by Ethan and Joel Coen
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Alexander the Great

Tired of stupid sword 'n' sandal costume pictures? Robert Rossen's all-star bio-epic of the charter founder of the Masons is a superior analysis of political ambition and the ruthless application of power. Yeah, he's wearing a blond wig, but Richard Burton captures the force of Alexander without camping up Asia Minor. Alexander the Great Blu-ray Twilight Time Limited Edition 1956 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 136 min. / Ship Date March 15, 2016 / available through Twilight Time Movies / 29.95 Starring Richard Burton, Fredric March, Claire Bloom, Danielle Darrieux, Barry Jones, Harry Andrews, Stanley Baker, Niall MacGinnis, Peter Cushing. Cinematography Robert Krasker Art Direction Andrej Andrejew Film Editor Ralph Kemplen Original Music Mario Nascimbene Produced by Gordon Griffith, Robert Rossen Written and Directed by Robert Rossen

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Critical opinions aren't supposed to flip-flop with every screening of a film, but I have to admit that my appreciation of Robert Rossen's 1956 epic Alexander the Great
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Mindy Newell: Review Redux

  • Comicmix
Cat Grant: One time at a party, Paul McCartney swore to me that he and Yoko were the closest of friends. He was more convincing.

Cat Grant not accepting Kara Danvers’ statement that she (Kara) is not Supergirl

Rey: There are stories about what happened.

Han Solo: It’s true. All of it. The Dark Side. The Jedi. They’re real.

Listen Up! Spoilers Abound, So If You Don’t Want To Know, Don’t Read This Column.

A few weeks ago, four days before Christmas to be exact, I said that I loved Star Wars: The Force Awakens, and had problems with Supergirl. While I still love Episode VI of a saga that took place a long time ago in a galaxy far, far away, there are two things that bother me. Silly things, to be sure, but just enough to pick at my enjoyment a teensy bit:
See full article at Comicmix »

Diff: Us studios eye Iranian market

Diff: Us studios eye Iranian market
Iran could become a major market for the Us studios, surpassing even the UAE, if sanctions are lifted as planned under a long-negotiated nuclear deal between the country and major world powers, according to 20th Century Fox executive vice president, Emea, Paul Higginson.

“Let’s see what actually happens and the timeline but as far as I’m concerned Iran is a very important potential market of 80 million people.As soon as we’re able to engage with the market, we will,” Higginson told Screen.

“Will they let us in? That’s for them to decide what they want to do. We’re available. We want to be involved in that market and we want to communicate. Communication improves understanding and we want to do business there. I think it would be important for the development of film, both inside and outside of Iran, if we were engaged there. I don’t see any downside.”

Following a landmark
See full article at ScreenDaily »

‘Frightmare aka The Horror Star’ Review (Vinegar Syndrome)

Stars: Ferdy Mayne, Leon Askin, Jeffrey Combs, Luca Bercovici, Nita Talbot, Leon Askin, Jennifer Starrett, Barbara Pilavin, Alan Stock | Written and Directed by Norman Thaddeus Vane

“There was Bela Lugosi, Boris Karloff, Lon Chaney, and Conrad Ragzoff! They were all stars who lived and died. But only one returned…”

Fandom takes on a whole new meaning when a group of film loving college students decide to pay the ultimate respects to their favourite horror icon, the recently deceased Conrad Radzoff (Ferdy Mayne). How do they do this? Hold a memorial? Have a Radzoff horror marathon? Nope, they decide to steal his freshly buried body and give hime the ultimate farewell house party back in their mansion! Like most cases however, this is one of those instances were one of your heroes is actually an arsehole (Cough-Tom Savini-Cough!). You see, Radzoff had an often fatal temper. Not even a
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Marilyn, Betty and Lauren How To Marry A Millionaire – Saturday Morning at The Hi-Pointe Theater

“Wealthy men are never old!”

How To Marry A Millionaire screens Saturday morning, November 21st, at 10:30am at The Hi-Pointe Theater (1005 McCausland Ave, St. Louis). This is a fundraiser for The Cottey College Scholarship Fund and admission is $10.

How To Marry A Millionaire is a 1953 romantic comedy based on the plays The Greeks Had a Word for It by Zoe Akins and Loco by Dale Eunson and Katherine Albert. The film stars Marilyn Monroe, St. Louis’ own Betty Grable and Lauren Bacall as three gold diggers along with William Powell, David Wayne, Rory Calhoun, Cameron Mitchell, Alex D’Arcy, and Fred Clark.It was directed by Jean Negulesco and produced and written by Nunnally Johnson.

In order to meet wealthy husbands, three beautiful women take an apartment in one of Manhattan’s most affluent areas, on the corner of East 55th St. and Sutton Place. Naive moocher Betty Grable
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

More Than 'Star Wars' Actress Mom: Reynolds Shines Even in Mawkish 'Nun' Based on Tragic Real-Life (Ex-)Nun

Debbie Reynolds ca. early 1950s. Debbie Reynolds movies: Oscar nominee for 'The Unsinkable Molly Brown,' sweetness and light in phony 'The Singing Nun' Debbie Reynolds is Turner Classic Movies' “Summer Under the Stars” star today, Aug. 23, '15. An MGM contract player from 1950 to 1959, Reynolds' movies can be seen just about every week on TCM. The only premiere on Debbie Reynolds Day is Jerry Paris' lively marital comedy How Sweet It Is (1968), costarring James Garner. This evening, TCM is showing Divorce American Style, The Catered Affair, The Unsinkable Molly Brown, and The Singing Nun. 'Divorce American Style,' 'The Catered Affair' Directed by the recently deceased Bud Yorkin, Divorce American Style (1967) is notable for its cast – Reynolds, Dick Van Dyke, Jean Simmons, Jason Robards, Van Johnson, Lee Grant – and for the fact that it earned Norman Lear (screenplay) and Robert Kaufman (story) a Best Original Screenplay Academy Award nomination.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Review: "Fraulein" (1958) Starring Mel Ferrer And Dana Wynter; Fox Cinema Archives Release

  • CinemaRetro
By Doug Oswald

Fraulein” begins with a close-up shot of the spires of a Gothic cathedral, organ music playing on the soundtrack and air-raid sirens blaring as a statement appears on screen: “Cologne on the Rhine during the last weeks of World War II.” The scene moves down to street level as German civilians and soldiers run for bomb shelters as destruction rains down on them. An American prisoner of war makes his escape during the chaos and he stumbles upon the home of a college professor and his daughter.

Mel Ferrer plays the American Pow, Captain Foster MacLain. He meets the Fraulein of the movie, Erika Angermann, played by Dana Wynter. She helps him evade capture during a search of her father’s home. We learn about a fiancé she has not seen in over two years. She learns later from a letter that he has been wounded and is in a hospital.
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Following Anderson's Death, Only Two Gwtw Performers Still Living

Gone with the Wind’ actress Mary Anderson dead at 96; also featured in Alfred Hitchcock thriller ‘LifeboatMary Anderson, an actress featured in both Gone with the Wind and Alfred Hitchcock’s adventure thriller Lifeboat, died following a series of small strokes on Sunday, April 6, 2014, while under hospice care in Toluca Lake/Burbank, northwest of downtown Los Angeles. Anderson, the widow of multiple Oscar-winning cinematographer Leon Shamroy, had turned 96 on April 3. Born in Birmingham, Alabama, in 1918, Mary Anderson was reportedly discovered by director George Cukor, at the time looking for an actress to play Scarlett O’Hara in David O. Selznick’s film version of Margaret Mitchell’s bestseller Gone with the Wind. Instead of Scarlett, eventually played by Vivien Leigh, Anderson was cast in the small role of Maybelle Merriwether — most of which reportedly ended up on the cutting-room floor. Cukor was later fired from the project; his replacement, Victor Fleming,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

17 Days Til Oscar

Today's Useless But Fun Oscar Trivia Numbers Chain!

• 17 years ago The English Patient (1996) won 9 Oscars, driving Julia Louis-Dreyfus Elaine to the brink of madness "quit telling your stupid story about the desert and just die already. die!!!" and making it one of the seven most-Oscared films of all time. (Only Titanic and Return of the King have since beat it). Can Gravity, which has 10 nominations but will definitely lose Best Actress, tie The Patient's record -- it would have to win All of its other nominations -- or do you foresee a "spread the wealth" year?

Sal Mineo is the only 17 year-old of either gender ever nominated for an Oscar. That nomination came for his role as "Plato" in Rebel Without a Cause (1955). Mineo also holds the record of youngest (male) actor to two nominations as he was nominated for Exodus (1960) by the age of 22. He would have turned 75 this
See full article at FilmExperience »

Michael Ansara, Kang on ‘Star Trek,’ Dies at 91

Michael Ansara, Kang on ‘Star Trek,’ Dies at 91
Michael Ansara, perhaps best known for his role as Kang on “Star Trek,” died in his Calabasas, Calif. home on July 31 following a prolonged illness. He was 91.

Ansara played the Klingon commander on three different “Star Trek” TV series: the original “Star Trek” (1968), “Deep Space Nine” (1994) and “Voyagers” (1996). He is beloved by fans of the franchise for being one of just seven actors to play the same character on three versions of the skein.

Ansara is also remembered for his starring role of the Chiricahua Apache cheif Cochise on the TV series “Broken Arrow.” The popular series was considered groundbreaking when it premiered in 1958, as it was one of few westerns to portray Native Americans in a positive light.

Despite being of Syrian descent, Ansara continued to be cast in Native American roles. He played another Apache, Deputy U.S. Marshal Sam Buckhart, on the Peacock’s 1959 series “Law of the Plainsman.
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Michael Ansara, Kang on 'Star Trek', dies at 91

Michael Ansara, Kang on 'Star Trek', dies at 91
Michael Ansara, the actor best known for playing Kang, a Klingon warrior on three versions of Star Trek, died Wednesday at the age of 91 at his home in Calabasas, CA. The Hollywood Reporter first reported the news.

Ansara’s former publicist and longtime friend Michael B. Druxman confirmed the news. Druxman told EW: “Michael and I have been friends since 1968. He was my best friend. He had a long illness. He died at home. He was a great guy, and a wonderful actor.” He added: “I really miss him.”

Born to American parents in Syria, Ansara had an extensive career in television and movies,
See full article at EW.com - Inside Movies »

Richard Burton to Receive Walk of Fame Star for Cleopatra's 50th Anniversary

  • MovieWeb
Richard Burton to Receive Walk of Fame Star for Cleopatra's 50th Anniversary
It has been confirmed today by the Hollywood Chamber of Commerce that Richard Burton will receive a posthumous star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in 2013 on Friday March 1st. Richard Burton's star will be placed next to Elizabeth Taylor's, honoring one of the most famous theatrical relationships and greatest love stories in history.

The ceremony is part of celebrations to commemorate the 50th anniversary of Cleopatra, directed by Joseph L. Mankiewicz and starring Burton and Taylor in their first on-screen feature. The Academy Award-winning film was released by 20th Century Fox in 1963 and will be available on Blu-ray Disc for the first time in 2013 from Twentieth Century Fox Home Entertainment.

Welsh business academic Professor Dylan Jones-Evans has led the campaign on behalf of the Western Mail, the national newspaper of Wales, to secure Richard Burton's star.

"I am delighted that Twentieth Century Fox Home Entertainment
See full article at MovieWeb »

DVD Release: Samson and Delilah (1949)

  • Disc Dish
Blu-ray & DVD Release Date: March 12, 2013

Price: DVD $19.99

Studio: Paramount

Victor Mature and Hedy Lamarr are Samson and Delilah.

Producer/director Cecil B. DeMille’s (The Ten Commandments) 1949 classic epic film Samson and Delilah finally makes it’s official DVD debut following years of, er, unofficial editions and poorly transferred imports.

Starring Victor Mature (The Robe) and Hedy Lamarr (My Favorite Spy) in the title roles, Samson and Delilah tells the story of the Bible’s fabled strongman and the woman who seduces and betrays him as it brings to life Samson’s incredible feats, including his battle with a lion, his single-handed assault on a thousand Philistine soldiers, and the spectacular climax in which he pulls down a pagan temple. Still, that Delilah is no slouch either…

Also starring George Sanders (All About Eve) and Angela Lansbury (The Manchurian Candidate), the lavish production earned five Academy Award nominations and won
See full article at Disc Dish »

Breaking the Bank: Six of Hollywood’s Lost Old-School Epics

For moviegoers growing up in the last 20-30 years, big is the new normal. I’m talking about those big-budget, over-produced, effects/action-packed extravaganzas that are as expected and routine an arrival as a commuter bus, and never more so than during the summer months. Come a rise in temperatures, there’s an almost ceaseless parade of these megabuck behemoths through multiplexes starting in May and continuing until the kids go back to school, one rolling out almost every week.

Consider these May-August releases and their eye-popping price tags:

5/4: Marvel’s The Avengers — $220 million

5/11: Dark Shadows — $150 million

5/18: Battleship — $209 million

5/25: Men in Black 3 — $250 million

6/8: Prometheus — $120-130 million

7/3: The Amazing Spider-Man — $220 million

7/20: The Dark Knight Rises — $250 million

7/31: Total Recall — $200 million

8/5: The Expendables 2 — $100 million

For those of you who haven’t been keeping count, that’s a little over $1.7 billion in productions
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Grant Bowler / Richard Burton: Liz & Dick

Grant Bowler / Richard Burton: Liz & Dick Grant Bowler as Richard Burton in Lifetime’s fall movie Liz & Dick looks less convincing than Lindsay Lohan as Elizabeth Taylor. Burton met Taylor at the time the two were making Cleopatra for 20th Century Fox. A troubled production, Cleopatra was initially to have starred Taylor, Peter Finch, and Stephen Boyd, under the direction of Rouben Mamoulian. Mamoulian left, Taylor fell seriously ill, nearly died, and had to have a tracheotomy performed. The end result was a Best Actress Academy Award for her troubles (and for Butterfield 8) and brand new leading men for Cleopatra: Richard Burton as Marc Antony and Rex Harrison as Julius Caesar. By then, Cleopatra also had a new director: two-time Best Director Oscar winner Joseph L. Mankiewicz. A respected stage and screen actor in the ’60s, Richard Burton was nominated for seven Academy Awards. Best Supporting Actor
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

The 50 greatest matte paintings of all time

The art of the glass shot or matte painting is one which originated very much in the early ‘teens’ of the silent era. Pioneer film maker, director, cameraman and visual effects inventor Norman Dawn is generally acknowledged as the father of the painted matte composite, with other visionary film makers such as Ferdinand Pinney Earle, Walter Hall and Walter Percy Day being heralded as making vast contributions to the trick process in the early 1920’s.

Boiled down, the matte process is one whereby a limited film set may be extended to whatever, or wherever the director’s imagination dictates with the employment of a matte artist. In it’s most pure form, the artist would set up a large plate of clear glass in front of the motion picture camera upon which he would carefully paint in new scenery an ornate period ceiling, snow capped mountains, a Gothic castle or even an alien world.
See full article at Shadowlocked »

Hail Caesar! What's Good & Bad About the New Sword & Sandal Movies

  • Moviefone
I come to praise Sword & Sandal movies -- not to bury them. But with Wrath of the Titans and the Sword & Sandal/sci-fi mash-up John Carter not exactly setting the world on fire -- along with recent disappointments like Immortals and Conan -- it's getting more difficult by the day to believe that the Sword & Sandal movie can survive the recent fumbling of this otherwise great genre. And that's a shame, because the Sword & Sandal movie -- known for its gladiatorial games, pagan orgies, depraved emperors, and the occasional snarling cyclops -- may represent the most colorful and enduring movie genre of all time. So for the uninitiated, what exactly is a Sword & Sandal movie? Like its cousin the Biblical epic, a Sword & Sandal movie -- or 'peplum,' named after a type of ancient Greek garment -- is typically set in the ancient Mediterranean world, and dramatizes the fight for freedom.
See full article at Moviefone »
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