Dark Passage (1947) - News Poster

(1947)

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Great Job, Internet!: Let’s remember San Francisco’s glorious history as the home of film noir

  • The AV Club
In the peak American film noir years from 1940 to 1960, an astonishing number of these movies took place in the scenic west coast city of San Francisco. Fandor’s new video, “Shadows In The Fog: Classic San Francisco Film Noir” points out that as many as 70 of these films were set in the city by the bay, including classics like John Huston’s version of the The Maltese Falcon, which kicked off the genre in 1941. Orson Welles followed in 1947 with The Lady From Shanghai, which featured scenes in the city’s famous aquarium and a suspenseful footrace through Chinatown.

That same year saw Humphrey Bogart’s return to San Fran to hide out after an escape from San Quentin in Dark Passage, highlighted by director Delmer Daves’ native knowledge of the city, as well as Robert Mitchum’s noir classic Out Of The Past. All of ...
See full article at The AV Club »

Bogie & Bacall! Dark Passage April 19th at The Tivoli – ‘Classics in the Loop’

“You know, it’s wonderful when guys like you lose out. Makes guys like me think maybe we got a chance in this world.”

Dark Passage (1947) screens Wednesday April 19th at The Tivoli Theater (6350 Delmar in ‘The Loop’) as part of their new ‘Classics in the Loop’ Crime & Noir film series. The movie starts at 7pm and admission is $7. It will be on The Tivoli’s big screen.

Dark Passage (1947) was the third of the four Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall pairings of the 40s. It’s the least remembered, but it’s great entertainment and Bacall and Bogart really steam up the screen. The movie starts off brilliantly, shown from the P.O.V. of Vincnet Parry (Bogart), a prison escapee, who has been wrongly incarcerated for his wife’s murder. While on the run he is picked up by a beautiful woman who has been following his case
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Dark Passage Screens April 19th at The Tivoli – ‘Classics in the Loop’

“You know, it’s wonderful when guys like you lose out. Makes guys like me think maybe we got a chance in this world.”

Dark Passage (1947) screens Wednesday April 19th at The Tivoli Theater (6350 Delmar in ‘The Loop’) as part of their new ‘Classics in the Loop’ Crime & Noir film series. The movie starts at 7pm and admission is $7. It will be on The Tivoli’s big screen.

Dark Passage (1947) was the third of the four Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall pairings of the 40s. It’s the least remembered, but it’s great entertainment and Bacall and Bogart really steam up the screen. The movie starts off brilliantly, shown from the P.O.V. of Vincnet Parry (Bogart), a prison escapee, who has been wrongly incarcerated for his wife’s murder. While on the run he is picked up by a beautiful woman who has been following his case
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Double Indemnity Screens April 12th at The Tivoli – ‘Classics in the Loop’

“Yes, I killed him. I killed him for money – and a woman – and I didn’t get the money and I didn’t get the woman. Pretty, isn’t it?”

Double Indemnity screens Wednesday April 12th at The Tivoli Theater (6350 Delmar in ‘The Loop’) as the second installment of their new ‘Classics in the Loop’ Crime & Noir film series. The movie starts at 7pm and admission is $7. It will be on The Tivoli’s big screen.

Cold-blooded, brutal, and stylishly directed by Billy Wilder, Double Indemnity is a prime example of The Film Noir genre and remains highly influential in its look, attitude and story. The 1944 crime drama set the pattern for that distinctive post-war genre: a shadowy, nighttime urban world of deception and betrayal usually distinguished by its “hard-boiled” dialogue, corrupt characters and the obligatory femme fatale who preys on the primal urges of an ordinary Joe hungry for sex and easy wealth.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

My Costar, My Spouse: 15 Celeb Couples Who Took Their Romance to the Big Screen

  • PEOPLE.com
My Costar, My Spouse: 15 Celeb Couples Who Took Their Romance to the Big Screen
A movie starring two famous actors who happen to be married in real-life: On paper, it sounds like it should be a sure-fire win. In reality? It’s not that simple.

It’s no wonder that famous couples might be hesitant to collaborate in a movie, even if it was guaranteed to smash the box office: Working with your spouse is hard, and it wouldn’t make it any easier to know that throngs of people would be examining the final product, looking for all possible glimpses into your personal life.

Occasionally, some famous couples have considered that possibility and decided,
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

The Maltese Falcon Kicks of the ‘Classics On the Loop’ Series Wednesday at The Tivoli

“The stuff that dreams are made of.”

The Maltese Falcon screens Wednesday April 5th at The Tivoli Theater (6350 Delmar in ‘The Loop’) as the first installment of their new ‘Classics in the Loop’ Crime & Noir film series. The movie starts at 7pm and admission is $7. It will be on The Tivoli’s big screen.

Frequently considered the first – and finest – example of film noir filmmaking in Hollywood, 1941’s classic The Maltese Falcon will cast its mysterious shadows on the silver screen once again at the Tivoli

Here’s the rare chance for movie buffs to see it in on the big screen, while a new generation can discover the secrets of the infamous “black bird” by seeing it for the first time. Originally released on Oct. 3, 1941, as the nation braced itself for the possibility of war, The Maltese Falcon launched John Huston’s directorial career with the story of high-living
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

‘Classics In The Loop’ – Wednesday Night ‘Classic Crime & Noir’ Film Series at The Tivoli Begins April 5th

There’s nothing more fun than getting to watch classic movies the way they were intended–on the big screen!

Now, I understand plenty of people don’t want to go to a theater, spend a fortune on tickets, popcorn, and a drink just to see the glow of cell phones and hear people rudely talking while someone kicks your seat from behind, but that’s not the experience you’ll get at Landmark theaters affordable ‘Crime & Noir’ film series. St. Louis movie buffs are in for a treat as Landmark’s The Tivoli Theater will return with it’s ‘Classics on the Loop’ every Wednesday beginning April 5th at 7pm. This season, the Tivoli will screen, on their big screen (which seats 320 btw), eight crime and noir masterpiece that need to be seen in a theater with an audience. Admission is only $7.

One benefits of the big screen is
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

The Best Of The Best – The Greatest Directors and the film which made them great Part 2

  • HeyUGuys
Author: Dave Roper

The Directors, The Auteurs, the Commanders of the Ship, Masters of All They Survey. This is the second of this two-part series on the greatest directors with more of cinematic luminaries under the spotlight. You can see the first part of this article here. You can catch up with the greatest writers, and the greatest actors here.

Here’s Part Two.

Howard HawksThe Big Sleep

Hawks, like his peer Billy Wilder, proved a genre-hopping master. Like Wilder, he had his crime/noir masterpieces (Scarface, The Big Sleep) and his comedies (Bringing Up Baby, His Girl Friday). Hawks also did a strong line in westerns, with Red River and Rio Bravo the best known and best regarded of this latter-career focus of his. As with any director who covers a lot of thematic ground during their career, it can be difficult to choose a “Best”, as you
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Noirvember Requests?

What are your three top noirs you'd love to see discussed this month? I mean besides the obvious choices like Gilda (a personal fav) and films we've discussed in the past few years already like Double Indemnity, Blood Simple, The Bigamist, and Woman in the Window.

Easy Access Fyi:

• Netflix has a paltry selection of Noir but they are offering Dressed to Kill, Don't Bother to Knock, Laura, and House on Telegraph Hill

• Amazon Prime is streaming The Killer is Loose, The Man in the Attic, The Hitchhiker, Shoot to Kill, Scarlett Street, Dark Passage, Strange Woman, Fear in the Night, The Stranger, Port of New York, Strange Illusion, Whistle Stop and Woman on the Run

• The new FilmStruck service has several foreign titles mostly from Japan and France
See full article at FilmExperience »

The Forgotten: Paul Wendkos' "The Burglar" (1957)

  • MUBI
TV stalwart Paul Wendkos' biggest success in movies was as the director of the Gidget series. I'm Scottish so I don't know what that was. But it turns out he had a real gift for expressionistic noir, as demonstrated in his debut film The Burglar, which was scripted by pulp noir icon David Goodis, whose novels provided source material for Delmer Daves' Dark Passage, Jacques Tourneur's Nightfall, Truffaut's Shoot the Piano Player, René Clément's And Hope to Die, Beineix's Moon in the Gutter (the author was big in France) and Sam Fuller's Street of No Return.The movie, a low-budget affair, substitutes flair and vigor for production values, and stars lifelong noir patsy/creep Dan Duryea and up-and-coming sex bomb Jayne Mansfield, with the result that it always seems to be in the wrong aspect ratio. Duryea's cranium seems to have an extra story built
See full article at MUBI »

Dark Passage

Bogie's back and Bacall's got him! Or, at least she's got his voice, and a bundle of bandages. A David Goodis hardboiled crime tale becomes an absurd pile of coincidences and accidental relationships, all wrapped up (literally) in a giant plastic-surgery gimmick. Bogart and his new bride Bacall are charming, but there's a show -stealer at large: the great Agnes Moorehead plays the most entertainingly horrible harpy in film history. Dark Passage Blu-ray Warner Archive Collection 1947 / B&W / 1:37 flat Academy / 106 min. / Street Date May 17, 2016 / available through the WBshop / 16.59 Starring Humphrey Bogart, Lauren Bacall, Agnes Moorehead, Bruce Bennett, Tom D'Andrea, Clifton Young, Douglas Kennedy, Rory Mallinson, Houseley Stevenson Cinematography Sid Hickox Art Direction Charles H. Clarke Film Editor David Weisbart Original Music Franz Waxman Written by Delmer Daves from a novel by David Goodis Produced by Jerry Wald, Jack L. Warner Directed by Delmer Daves

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Dark Passage
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Hell Hath No Fury Like a Woman Scorned: On ‘Too Late for Tears’ and ‘Woman on the Run’

As a supplement to our Recommended Discs weekly feature, Peter Labuza regularly highlights notable recent home-video releases with expanded reviews. See this week’s selections below.

Hell hath no fury like a woman scorned. Two new restorations from the UCLA Film and Television Archive, in conjunction with the Film Noir Foundation, certainly speak to that ethos. First up, the piercing eyes of Lisabeth Scott explain everything one might need to know about this woman who wants it all. In Byron Haskin‘s Too Late for Tears, writer Roy Huggins stages a flipped gender perspective of Double Indemnity. Driving along with her dull husband (Arthur Kennedy at his most subdued), Scott’s Jane Palmer has a bag of $60,000 literally drop in her lap. Goody two-shoes husband wants to hand it to the authorities, but she sees this as the opportunity to finally lean in. Dp William C. Mellor lights Scott’s
See full article at The Film Stage »

Off The Shelf – Episode 90 – New Blu-ray and DVD Releases for Tuesday, May 17th 2016

In this episode of Off The Shelf, Ryan and Brian take a look at the new DVD and Blu-ray releases for Tuesday, May 17th 2016.

Subscribe in iTunes or RSS.

Follow-Up A History of Disney Television Animation: volume I Amazon purchases News Criterion August titles Kino Lorber: I The Jury, Beautiful Blonde from Bashful Bend, The Neptune Factor, Finders Keepers Code Red: Screams of a Winter Night, The Working Girls Scorpion Releasing: Don’t Go In The House, also – Go Tell the Spartans – through Screen Archives Links to Amazon Candy Cop Rock: The Complete Series Dark Passage FitzPatrick Traveltalks: Volume 1 For Men Only / School for Sex Hired To Kill I Saw What You Did Killer Force The Last Command (Masters of Cinema) The Naked Island Too Late for Tears (Flicker Alley) Who Is Harry Kellerman and Why Is He Saying Those Terrible Things About Me? The Witch
See full article at CriterionCast »

Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘The Witch,’ ‘The Naked Island,’ ‘Inherent Vice,’ and More

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

The Witch (Robert Eggers)

“We will conquer this wilderness. It will not consume us,” foreshadows our patriarch in the first act of The Witch, a delightfully insane bit of 17th century devilish fun. As if Ingmar Bergman and Ken Russell co-directed Kill List, Robert Eggers’ directorial debut follows a God-fearing Puritan family banished from their settlement in a colonial New England, only to have their deep sense of faith uprooted when our title character has her way with their fate.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Watch: Restore your love in movies, here’s short film ‘100 Years/100 Shots’

Filmmaker and self-pronounced cinephile Jacob T. Swinney has a new video essay called 100 Years/100 Shots. The title’s pretty self-explanatory. It’s about the history of Tequila in the 21st century.

Swinney has chosen his most memorable shot from each year in the last 100 and placed them next to each other in chronological sequence. Not only does it fascinatingly chart the evolution of the medium, it also reaffirms why we devote so much of our spare time to the movies. See beneath the video embed below for the full list (in order) used.

100 Years/100 Shots from Jacob T. Swinney on Vimeo.

Birth of a Nation

Intolerance

The Immigrant

A Dog’s Life

Broken Blossoms

The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari

The Kid

Nosferatu

Safety Last

Sherlock Junior

Battleship Potemkin

The General

Metropolis

The Passion of Joan of Arc

Un Chien Andalou

All Quiet on the Western Front

Frankenstein

Scarface

King Kong
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Hardcore Henry Review

Courtesy of Stx Entertainment

In the action thriller Hardcore Henry, a man wakes up in a high-tech lab and is told by a woman in a lab coat he has been brought back to life as a human-robot hybrid. He can’t remember anything but she tells him his name is Henry and she is his wife, slipping a wedding ring on his finger. But as she is preparing to restore his ability to speak, the lab is attacked. Shortly, Henry is running for his life in Moscow and hoping to rescue his wife from the attackers who have taken her.

The twist with this high-octane thriller is that it is shot in first-person point-of-view, where the audience sees through Henry’s eyes as he battles to stay alive using his considerable skills. Since he cannot speak, the viewer is completely immersed in his role, which is shot like a
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Off The Shelf – Episode 85 – New Blu-ray & DVD Releases for Tuesday, April 5th 2016

In this episode of Off The Shelf, Ryan and Brian take a look at the new DVD and Blu-ray releases for Tuesday, April 6th, 2016.

Subscribe in iTunes or RSS.

Follow-Up A History of Disney Television Animation: volume I by Tim Van Hal — Kickstarter Marion Davies’ breakthrough film comes to home video by Ben Model — Kickstarter News Warner Archive on Twitter: “Someone carelessly left this upcoming DVD release schedule up on their monitor where everyone can see it…” Universal – Jaws 2, Jaws 3-D, & Jaws: The Revenge on June 14th Kino Lorber: Grandview USA, They’re Playing with Fire, Five Miles to Midnight Synapse: Sorceress Rocktober Blood – Indiegogo Blu-ray + Cd ($50!) Disney Movie Club: Operation Dumbo Drop Star Trek Uhd BDs & Box Sets Olive Films Announce June Titles Shout Factory: Cop Rock on DVD Criterion: UK titles Misc Links Dark Passage (film) – Wikipedia Vondie Curtis-Hall – Wikipedia Links to Amazon The Black Cat
See full article at CriterionCast »

Friday Noir #144: ‘The Red House’ showcases dark ideas and one of Robinson’s best performances

  • SoundOnSight
The Red House

Written and directed by Delmer Daves

U.S.A., 1947

*It should be noted that in order to properly analyze the heart of the picture’s themes, certain important plot points are divulged in the review below.

Sequestered away from most of the town they live in, the Morgan’s operate a modest but efficient little farm. Patriarch Pete (Edward G. Robinson), slightly handicapped by a wooden leg resulting from an incident many years ago, remains hard at work but evidently could use some assistance. Enter young Nath Storm (Lon McCallister), a boy from school that Pete’s shy adopted daughter, Meg (Allene Roberts) befriends and fancies. Meg introduces Nath to Pete, the latter reluctantly agreeing to give the youth a job. Whilst the first day goes swimmingly, that evening proves the fire starter that complicates each of their lives. Nath insists on taking a short cut through the woods,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

London Film Review: ‘Remainder’

London Film Review: ‘Remainder’
It’s all in the mind. As in “Memento” and “Mulholland Drive” before it, the function and operation of memory beguiles “Remainder,” an absorbing first feature from prolific Israeli video artist Omer Fast. This noirish, sporadically playful London-set psychological thriller begins as an unidentified object falls from the sky, squashing Tom Sturridge’s nameless protag like a bug and providing the starting point for a brisk but esoteric disquisition on identity and trauma. Adapted by the director from Tom McCarthy’s cult debut novel, the film inevitably but perhaps desirably compresses the book’s complexities. The end product is a kind of distilled, well, remainder of the text: more jarring, more dreamlike, and perhaps harder to follow for the uninitiated.

“What price silence?” is the question that initially propels “Remainder,” as Sturridge’s character awakens from a coma to find his lawyer negotiating an unprecedented reparations settlement of £8.5 million (about $9.7 million) on his behalf.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

From Jacques Tourneur to Humphrey Bogart, What to See at La's Noir City

From Jacques Tourneur to Humphrey Bogart, What to See at La's Noir City
The American Cinematheque and the Film Noir Foundation present the 17th annual Noir City fest, running April 3-19 at the Egyptian Theatre in Hollywood. Rarely seen gems, restorations, new 35mm prints, films unavailable on DVD and Oscar nominees abound in this journey of 12 nights and 26 films through the side streets and back alleys of film noir. This year, some true giants of the genre get a salute, including Humphrey Bogart in Delmer Daves' pitch-black 1947 "Dark Passage" opposite Lauren Bacall, Barbara Stanwyck in Roy Rowland's 1954 "Witness to Murder" (like Hitchcock's "Rear Window" through the eyes of a woman) and John Sturges' 1953 "Jeopardy" and French-American auteur Jacques Tourneur's "Circle of Danger" and "Berlin Express." Also check out the Film Noir Foundation's 35mm restoration of "Woman on the Run," which world-premiered earlier this year at San Francisco's Noir City. Directed by Norman...
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »
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