They Died with Their Boots On (1941) - News Poster

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The director of Highlander is making an Errol Flynn biopic

David Crow May 9, 2017

The director of Highlander and The Shadow has been tapped to direct a biopic on Errol Flynn's early years as a treasure hunter.

Errol Flynn is one of Hollywood’s very first action stars. Known for his dashing good looks (and his notorious after hours affairs), Flynn enjoyed a swashbuckling career in Hollywood throughout the 1930s, 40s, and 50s, famously defining the pirate subgenre with turns in Captain Blood (1935) and The Sea Hawk (1940), and going West, young man, for the genre’s first Technicolor extravaganza Dodge City (1938), as well as the classic piece of historical revisionism that is They Died With Their Boots On (1941). Of course, to many, he simply remains the definitive Prince of Thieves from The Adventures of Robin Hood (1938). Sorry, Kevin.

But Flynn had plenty of adventures before he fell into movie song, drink, and lechery. And it appears it will be getting
See full article at Den of Geek »

Review: "The Glory Guys" (1965) Starring Tom Tryon And Senta Berger; Twilight Time Blu-ray Release

  • CinemaRetro
By John M. Whalen

Back in the 1950s, before he became a legend, filmmaker Sam Peckinpah (“The Wild Bunch,” “Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia,” and “The Killer Elite”) wrote scripts for TV westerns, including “Gunsmoke,” “The Rifleman,” and “Tombstone Territory.” His reputation grew and in 1957 he wrote his first screenplay entitled “The Glory Guys” which was based on Hoffman Birney’s novel, “The Dice of God.” The book was a fictional account of Custer and the Battle of the Little Big Horn, with all names changed. The script went unproduced for almost eight years, and in the meantime Sam had moved on, directing features including “The Deadly Companions” (1960), “Ride the High Country” (1962) and “Major Dundee” (1965).

You would think that with that growing resume, Peckinpah would have been able to direct anything he wanted to, but such was far from the case. “Bloody Sam,” as he was called, affectionately by his fans,
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Last Surviving Gwtw Star and 2-Time Oscar Winner Has Turned 99: As a Plus, She Made U.S. Labor Law History

Olivia de Havilland picture U.S. labor history-making 'Gone with the Wind' star and two-time Best Actress winner Olivia de Havilland turns 99 (This Olivia de Havilland article is currently being revised and expanded.) Two-time Best Actress Academy Award winner Olivia de Havilland, the only surviving major Gone with the Wind cast member and oldest surviving Oscar winner, is turning 99 years old today, July 1.[1] Also known for her widely publicized feud with sister Joan Fontaine and for her eight movies with Errol Flynn, de Havilland should be remembered as well for having made Hollywood labor history. This particular history has nothing to do with de Havilland's films, her two Oscars, Gone with the Wind, Joan Fontaine, or Errol Flynn. Instead, history was made as a result of a legal fight: after winning a lawsuit against Warner Bros. in the mid-'40s, Olivia de Havilland put an end to treacherous
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Eleanor Parker obituary

Versatile actor best known for her roles in The Sound of Music and Of Human Bondage

In the Hollywood of the 1940s and 50s, when typecasting was an essential constituent of stardom, Eleanor Parker, who has died aged 91, never gained the recognition she deserved, because she refused to be pigeonholed. "It means I've been successful in creating the characters that I've portrayed – that I'm not just a personality who is seen in a variety of roles." Dana Andrews, her co-star in Madison Avenue (1962), called her "the least heralded great actress".

The 1957 film Lizzie is almost a reflection of her career. Parker plays three separate and distinct characters harboured inside one woman – the shy, self-effacing Elizabeth; the wanton, raunchy Lizzie; and the "normal" Beth – and switches brilliantly from one to the other. Parker was always able to be convincing in these three sorts of characters. She was naive as the girl
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Eleanor Parker obituary

Versatile actor best known for her roles in The Sound of Music and Of Human Bondage

In the Hollywood of the 1940s and 50s, when typecasting was an essential constituent of stardom, Eleanor Parker, who has died aged 91, never gained the recognition she deserved, because she refused to be pigeonholed. "It means I've been successful in creating the characters that I've portrayed – that I'm not just a personality who is seen in a variety of roles." Dana Andrews, her co-star in Madison Avenue (1962), called her "the least heralded great actress".

The 1957 film Lizzie is almost a reflection of her career. Parker plays three separate and distinct characters harboured inside one woman – the shy, self-effacing Elizabeth; the wanton, raunchy Lizzie; and the "normal" Beth – and switches brilliantly from one to the other. Parker was always able to be convincing in these three sorts of characters. She was naive as the girl
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

“Sound of Music” Star Eleanor Parker Has Died

She lived a long and storied life as one of Tinseltown’s great actresses, and sadly Eleanor Parker passed away yesterday (December 9) in Palm Springs, California.

The late actress, who was 91 years old, was best known for her supporting actress role in “The Sound of Music,” playing Baroness Schraeder opposite Christopher Plummer.

Additionally, Parker received three Best Actress nominations from the Academy Awards during the course of her career, cementing her place in Hollywood history.

Plummer told the La Times, "Eleanor Parker was and is one of the most beautiful ladies I have ever known. I hardly believe the sad news for I was sure she was enchanted and would live forever."

Eleanor’s son Paul Clemens shared, "[Her part in the Sound of Music] was a lovely role, and she was terrific in it, but it was hardly her greatest role. It was only in the last 10 years of her life that she became glad she had done the film.
See full article at GossipCenter »

Julie Andrews' Rival in The Sound Of Music, 3-Time Oscar Nominee Has Died

Eleanor Parker dead at 91: ‘The Sound of Music’ actress, three-time Best Actress Oscar nominee (photo: Eleanor Parker ca. 1945) Eleanor Parker, one of the best and most beautiful actresses of the studio era, a three-time Best Actress Academy Award nominee, and one of the stars of the 1965 blockbuster and Best Picture Oscar winner The Sound of Music, died today, December 9, 2013, of complications from pneumonia at a medical facility near her home in the Southern Californian desert town of Palm Springs. Eleanor Parker was 91. “I’m primarily a character actress,” Parker told the Toronto Star in 1988. “I’ve portrayed so many diverse individuals on the screen that my own personality never emerged.” At one point, wildly imaginative publicists called her The Woman of a Thousand Faces — an absurd label, when you think of Man of a Thousand Faces Lon Chaney. Eleanor Parker never altered her appearance the way Chaney did — her
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Actress Eleanor Parker, the Baroness in ‘The Sound of Music,’ Dies at 91

Actress Eleanor Parker, the Baroness in ‘The Sound of Music,’ Dies at 91
Oscar-nominated actress Eleanor Parker, best known today for her role as the Baroness, the lady friend of Captain Von Trapp who loses out to Julie Andrews’ Maria in 1966 film “The Sound of Music,” died Monday morning due to complications from pneumonia at a medical facility near Palm Springs, Calif. She was 91.

In the 1950s, however, Parker earned three Oscar nominations for best actress: in 1951, for “Caged,” in which she played a naive young widow made cynical by her experiences in prison; in 1952, for William Wyler’s “Detective Story,” in which she portrayed the wife of a ruthless police detective (Kirk Douglas) who ultimately reveals that she has availed herself of the services of the abortionist he’s intent on imprisoning; and in 1956 for biopic “Interrupted Melody,” in which she portrayed Australian-born opera star Marjorie Lawrence, who battled back from polio.

Parker showed impressive range, which was clearly her intention. She once said,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Eleanor Parker, 'Sound of Music' Actress, Dead at 91

  • Moviefone
Jessica Herndon, AP Film Writer

Los Angeles (AP) - Eleanor Parker, who was nominated for Academy Awards three times for her portrayals of strong-willed women and played a scheming baroness in "The Sound of Music," has died at 91.

Family friend Richard Gale said Parker died Monday morning due to complications from pneumonia. "She passed away peacefully, surrounded by her children at a medical facility near her home in Palm Springs," Gale added.

Parker was nominated for Oscars in 1950, 1951 and 1955, but then saw her career begin to wane in the early 1960s. Her last memorable role came in 1965's "The Sound of Music," in which she played the scheming baroness who loses Christopher Plummer to Julie Andrews.

"Eleanor Parker was and is one of the most beautiful ladies I have ever known," said Plummer in a statement. "Both as a person and as a beauty. I hardly believe the sad news
See full article at Moviefone »

Three-Time Academy Award Nominee Turns 91 Today

Eleanor Parker: Palm Springs resident turns 91 today Eleanor Parker turns 91 today. The three-time Oscar nominee (Caged, 1950; Detective Story, 1951; Interrupted Melody, 1955) and Palm Springs resident is Turner Classic Movies’ Star of the Month of June 2013. Earlier this month, TCM showed a few dozen Eleanor Parker movies, from her days at Warner Bros. in the ’40s to her later career as a top Hollywood supporting player. (Photo: Publicity shot of Eleanor Parker in An American Dream.) Missing from TCM’s movie series, however, was not only Eleanor Parker’s biggest box-office it — The Sound of Music, in which she steals the show from both Julie Andrews and the Alps — but also what according to several sources is her very first movie role: a bit part in Raoul Walsh’s They Died with Their Boots On, a 1941 Western starring Errol Flynn as a dashingly handsome and all-around-good-guy-ish General George Armstrong Custer. Olivia de Havilland
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Which War?

  • MUBI
Doom in the dust, from Raoul Walsh's They Died with Their Boots On (1941). In wide shot, the combatants register not as people, but as clumps of ants; in close-up and medium shot, they stand carefully arranged in recruitment poster poses. Two takes on warfare in counterpoint: the heroic ideal, where distinct and handsome individuals act with purpose, and the messy, inglorious stuff of fear, large-scale death, and group will.
See full article at MUBI »

The Eagle – review

A young Roman soldier begins a dangerous quest to clear his family name in this accomplished action-adventure movie

First published in 1954, The Eagle of the Ninth, Rosemary Sutcliff's novel for older children, is now regarded as a classic. Her title refers to the standard carried by the Ninth Legion of the Roman army that disappeared in the north of Britain in the second century Ad, and it's the story of how the young Marcus Aquila later sets out to discover what happened to its leader, his father Flavius Aquila, and the 500 men he led. When the book appeared I had long passed the 12-16 age group at which it was aimed, though I was acquainted with an equally exciting, if less respectable yarn published exactly a decade earlier, also by the Oxford University Press: Captain We Johns's Biggles – Charter Pilot.

In Johns's book (a first edition of which was
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Horses in film: Why the long face?

It's because Hollywood has put horses out to pasture, and the days of the great equine role seem to have passed. Joe Queenan mourns the disappearance of Hollywood's mane players

At a certain age, actors – both men and women– start to complain that they are no longer offered the roles they once were, that the scripts they are sent by their agents are not equal to their talents. But isn't that even more true of horses? Horses used to be prominent figures in films, rearing their glorious heads and shaking their magnificent manes in everything from Fort Apache to Ben-Hur, not to mention idolatrously horse-centred motion pictures such as The Man from Snowy River and National Velvet. But the arrival of a new movie such as Secretariat drives home the point that horses no longer occupy the position of power in Hollywood that they once did, that a movie featuring
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

[DVD Review] TCM Spotlight: The Errol Flynn Adventures

“Just give him a sword and let him do his thing,” was the way Errol Flynn described the studio executive’s opinions of him. In his heyday, Flynn was known as the king of Hollywood Swashbucklers. He’s still best remembered today for his tights-and-fights adventures, such as Captain Blood, The Sea Hawk, Don Juan, The Prince & the Pauper and most notably The Adventures of Robin Hood. But there was more to Flynn’s career than that.

From the late 1930s through the mid 1940s, the dashing Flynn was one of the two biggest action film stars in the world (the other being John Wayne). Aside from costumed adventures, he also made Westerns (Dodge City; They Died With Their Boots On) and War movies (Dawn Patrol). Although he may have seemed miscast as a cowboy, people accepted it because it was the beloved Flynn in the white hat. And when it came to war films,
See full article at JustPressPlay »

SXSW Review: Reel Injun

SXSW Review: Reel Injun
Much more than a simple collection of clips, Reel Injun proves to be an illuminating semi-personal essay as well. Filmmaker Neil Diamond travels across North America as a backdrop for his exploration of Hollywood's heritage in depicting Indians on the big screen. Hint: It is found severely wanting.

Reel Injun features interviews with Clint Eastwood, directors Jim Jarmusch and Chris Eyre, actor Adam Beach, and comedian Charlie Hill along with the multi-talented and influential Russell Means and John Trudell. Sacheen Littlefeather recounts her life leading up to the memorable night in which she declined the Academy Award for Marlon Brando; Means and Trudell recall what that meant, coming as it did in the midst of the takeover in Wounded Knee, South Dakota.

But Diamond begins with movies that are big, well-known targets. They Died With Their Boots On (1941) and Stagecoach (1939) reduced Native Americans to offensive caricatures as bloodthirsty savages, "injuns
See full article at Cinematical »

Philip French's screen legends

No 76: Errol Flynn 1909-1959

Flynn was born in Tasmania, the son of an eminent marine biologist, and early on developed a passion for the sea and a reputation as a rebel. Spotted by a Warner Brothers talent scout while a young, very minor actor in England, he became an overnight Hollywood star in 1935 as a last-minute replacement for Robert Donat as the swashbuckling hero of Captain Blood. By 1936 he was the leading contender to play Rhett Butler in Gone With The Wind.

Flynn was tall, slim, graceful, debonair with a neatly trimmed moustache, a winning smile, a hearty, self-mocking laugh. Everything he did, both on screen and off, contributed to his legendary status: the colonial background (he claimed to be a descendant of Fletcher Christian); the celebrated characters he played (General Custer, Robin Hood); his sexual conquests; his prodigious phallic dimensions (according to Truman Capote in Music for Chameleons,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Honest Injuns - Saluting the Real Deal Native American Stars of the Wild West

For a long time, a jar of bronze makeup was the crucial component in playing a Native American in the Wild West. Cross-racial turns by Burt Lancaster in Apache, Chuck Connors in Geronimo, and Anthony Quinn in They Died With Their Boots On are the most glaring examples -- not to mention the legions of hooting buckskins felled by the benevolent cinematic gunfire of the U.S. Calvary. In honor
See full article at AMC Future of Classic: Westerns »

Honest Injuns - Saluting the Real Deal Native American Stars of the Wild West

For a long time, a jar of bronze makeup was the crucial component in playing a Native American in the Wild West. Cross-racial turns by Burt Lancaster in Apache, Chuck Connors in Geronimo, and Anthony Quinn in They Died With Their Boots On are the most glaring examples -- not to mention the legions of hooting buckskins felled by the benevolent cinematic gunfire of the U.S. Calvary. In honor
See full article at AMC Future of Classic: Westerns »

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