Sullivan's Travels (1941) - News Poster

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The Forgotten: George Archainbaud's "Hotel Haywire" (1937)

Really, I mean Preston Sturges' Hotel Haywire, because nobody's too interested in George Archainbaud, a Paramount contract director who had been directing for 20 years without helming a really memorable film (Thirteen Women, an uncomfortably racist pre-Code with Myrna Loy, is as exciting as it gets, and even that one is remembered chiefly for featuring the girl who threw herself off the Hollywood sign), He would continue for another 20, moving from B-westerns into TV westerns, without making anything else of particular note.Sturges wrote the script as part of his plan to get a long-term contract at Paramount. To particularly appeal to the suits there, he filled the story with roles for Paramount stars such as Mary Boland, Charles Ruggles, Fred MacMurray and Burns & Allen, none of whom were necessarily famous enough to carry a movie, but whose combined star-power might make an attractive investment for studio or future ticket-buyers.
See full article at MUBI »

The 25 greatest movies about making movies

Mark Harrison May 19, 2017

From the currently playing Their Finest to the likes of Bowfinger and Boogie Nights, we salute the movies about making movies...

If you haven't caught up yet, Their Finest is currently playing in UK cinemas and it's a gorgeous little love letter to perseverance through storytelling, set against the backdrop of a film production office at the British Ministry of Information during the Second World War. Based on Lissa Evans' novel, Gemma Arterton and Bill Nighy play characters whose access to the film industry has been contingent on the global crisis that takes other young men away from such trifling matters, and it's a real joy to watch.

Among other things, the film got us thinking about other films about making films. We're not talking about documentaries, even though Hearts Of Darkness, the documentary about the making of Apocalypse Now, may be the greatest film about
See full article at Den of Geek »

Woody Allen: A Career in 20 Hilarious, Brilliant Lines

Woody Allen: A Career in 20 Hilarious, Brilliant Lines
This Friday, Café Society, the latest release from writer/director/comic godhead Woody Allen, waltzes into theaters — the 47th feature Allen has directed over a career spanning 50 years. (Yes, we're counting New York Stories.) He's had box-office successes and outright bombs, Oscar-winning masterpieces and critically panned duds. But regardless of his movies' receptions (and the reoccurring rumors about his personal life), he's managed to pump out a film a year with impressive regularity. Some key elements have stayed the same — once a jazz clarinet slinks onto the soundtrack, audiences know exactly who they're dealing with.
See full article at Rolling Stone »

The Invisible Monster

Welcome to the weird, irresistible world of Republic Serials, an art form with rules of content and conduct that have no resemblance to other movies, or any reality we know. "The Phantom Ruler" has plans for world conquest, so get ready for a punch-out every five minutes and a terrific Lydecker miniature special effect in almost every episode. Richard Webb and Aline Towne star, but we love the bad guys, because they try so hard and fail so consistently. The Invisible Monster Blu-ray Olive Films 1950 / B&W / 1:37 flat Academy / 167 min. / Street Date September 22, 2015 / available through the Olive Films website / 29.95 Starring Richard Webb, Aline Towne, Lane Bradford, Stanley Price, John Crawford, George Meeker. Cinematography Ellis W. Carter Film Editor Cliff Hanger, Justin Thyme (as Cliff Bell & Sam Star) Original Music Stanley Wilson Written by Ronald Davidson Produced by Franklin Adreon Directed by Fred C. Bannon  

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Olive Films
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Emperor of the North

What would seem the perfect project for tough-guy director Robert Aldrich still commands a high reputation with some. Ambitious top-dog hobo Lee Marvin squares off against Ernest Borgnine's nearly demonic railroad conductor who routinely murders bums that dare to hitch a ride. The mayhem culminates in a battle on a moving flat car, between Ernie's log chain and Lee's fire ax. But the poetic dialogue and allegorical pretension may be more lethal. Emperor of the North Blu-ray Twilight Time Limited Edition 1973 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 120 min. / Ship Date September 8, 2015 / available through Twilight Time Movies / 29.95 Starring Lee Marvin, Ernest Borgnine, Keith Carradine, Charles Tyner, Malcolm Atterbury, Simon Oakland, Harry Caesar, Hal Baylor, Matt Clark, Elisha Cook Jr., Joe Di Reda, Liam Dunn, Diane Dye, Robert Foulk, Sid Haig, Vic Tayback, Dave Willock, Lance Henricksen. Cinematography Joseph Biroc Art Direction Jack Martin Smith Film Editor Michael Luciano Original Music Frank De Vol
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Martin Scorsese's Movie Poster Collection Is Cinephile Eye-Candy

Martin Scorsese's Movie Poster Collection Is Cinephile Eye-Candy
Celluloid crusader Martin Scorsese's preservation nonprofit Film Foundation has resurrected classics since 1990, including the recent restoration of Powell and Pressburger's "Tales of Hoffmann." MoMA's ongoing Scorsese presentation centers around a rare, billboard-sized poster of that 1951 operatic fantasy, along with over 30 other marvelous spreads from the director's collection. Check out highlights below — courtesy of Quartz — including rare international posters for "On the Waterfront," "I Walked with a Zombie," "Sullivan's Travels" and a four-panel for "The Searchers." The MoMA exhibit accompanies a major screening series of Scorsese's handpicked favorites, and Film Foundation restorations of "Hoffmann," "On the Waterfront" and "The Red Shoes." Read More: How Martin Scorsese and Thelma Schoonmaker Restored the Luster of Michael Powell and "The Tales of Hoffmann"
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Top Five review

Chris Rock's latest outing is a semi-autobiographical take on the rise and fall (and rise?) of a comedy star...

Your mileage may vary on inside-track Hollywood comedies. Among the greats, there are biting satires like The Player or Swimming With Sharks and broader, sillier works like Tropic Thunder or Bowfinger, but the kind of rarefied air in which they largely unfold can sometimes be suffocating.

Thankfully, that's not the case with Top Five, Chris Rock's first project as a writer-director since 2007's I Think I Love My Wife, and inarguably his best so far. With a semi-autobiographical approach, the film clearly has a lot of influences from other films but thrives on a brand of charm that is entirely its own.

Andre Allen (Rock) is a stand-up comedian turned movie star who is best known for a trilogy of cringe-making comedy movies in which he stars as a crime-fighting bear called Hammy.
See full article at Den of Geek »

Why 1974 was the best year in film history

  • Hitfix
Why 1974 was the best year in film history
All week long our writers will debate: Which was the greatest film year of the past half century.  Click here for a complete list of our essays. I was one of the first to select years for this particular exercise, which probably allowed me to select the correct year. The answer is, of course, 1974 and all other answers are wrong. No matter what your criteria happens to be, 1974 is going to come out on top. Again, this is not ambiguous or open to debate. We have to start, of course, with the best of the best. "Chinatown" is one of the greatest movies ever made. You can't structure a thriller better than Robert Towne and Roman Polanski do, nor shoot a Los Angeles movie better than John Alonzo has done. Jack Nicholson and Faye Dunaway give the best performances of their careers, which is no small achievement. If you ask
See full article at Hitfix »

The 8 Essential Films Of Preston Sturges

"If I don't run out of ideas —and I won't— we'll have some fun. There are some wonderful pictures to be made, and God willing, I will make some of them." So said writer-director (and early pioneer of that hyphenate) Preston Sturges, a few years prior to making perhaps his most wonderful picture "Sullivan's Travels" —recently released on Criterion Blu-ray— and following the success of his first venture behind the camera for his own screenplay of "The Great McGinty." That film, for which Sturges essentially waived his writer's fee in order to direct, won him the first ever Screenwriting Academy Award. But of course it did: by the time of his directorial debut, Sturges was already one of the best-known and best-paid screenwriters in Hollywood during a period when screenwriters were mostly anonymous, underpaid drones working thanklessly in shared stuffy offices on studio backlots. Somehow transcending that lowly status to a $2500 a week salary and.
See full article at The Playlist »

'Sullivan's Travels' (Criterion Collection) Blu-ray Review

What amazed me most about Preston Sturges' Sullivan's Travels (1941), watching it for the first time on this newly released Criterion Blu-ray, is just how utterly unpredictable it is. Sure, we know where it may end once we are introduced to John L. Sullivan (Joel McCrea), a big Hollywood director, who's decided to hit the road as a hobo to attain a greater understanding of human suffering before embarking on a serious adaptation of the fictional novel "O Brother, Where Art Thouc" (Yes, it is this fictional book Joel and Ethan Coen were name-checking with the title of their 2000 comedy.) But as much as we know what the end will offer, it's the path to that ending we don't see coming, even when it arrives. Set during the Great Depression, Sullivan, known for his comedies, isn't seeing anything funny in the world. When his producers suggest making a "nice musical
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

What I Watched, What You Watched #292

Three movies for me this week and one Q&A (with Ex Machina writer/director Alex Garland following a screening here in Seattle) as I saw Unfriended earlier in the week (read my review here) and at home I watched the new Criterion edition of Preston Sturges' Sullivan's Travels (review coming soon) and I also watched Dr. No. In fact, I came close to watching Dr. No twice as my first attempt late Friday night ended with me having to turn it off with about 30 minutes left because I couldn't keep my eyes open. Last night I started it over again and almost had the same issue, but I got up, walked around a bit and was able to compose myself and finish it. Of course, that means I woke up early this morning to write this up and get to work on box office and I'm a bit tired.
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

Daily | Welles, Costa, Sturges

The Hollywood Reporter calls Josh Karp's Orson Welles's Last Movie: The Making of The Other Side of the Wind "an early contender for this year's best book about Hollywood"—and Vanity Fair's running a generous excerpt. Meantime, Jonathan Rosenbaum's posted his 2006 review of Simon Callow's biography of Welles. Also in today's roundup: Seven philosophers each pick a film to address an essential question. Zach Lewis on Jean-Luc Godard's Adieu au langage. A talk with Pedro Costa. Clayton Dillard on Preston Sturges's Sullivan's Travels. Steven Boone on Shirley Clarke's The Connection. Yusef Sayed on Sidney Lumet's The Offence. Kim Morgan on Stanley Kubrick's The Killing. And more. » - David Hudson
See full article at Fandor: Keyframe »

Daily | Welles, Costa, Sturges

The Hollywood Reporter calls Josh Karp's Orson Welles's Last Movie: The Making of The Other Side of the Wind "an early contender for this year's best book about Hollywood"—and Vanity Fair's running a generous excerpt. Meantime, Jonathan Rosenbaum's posted his 2006 review of Simon Callow's biography of Welles. Also in today's roundup: Seven philosophers each pick a film to address an essential question. Zach Lewis on Jean-Luc Godard's Adieu au langage. A talk with Pedro Costa. Clayton Dillard on Preston Sturges's Sullivan's Travels. Steven Boone on Shirley Clarke's The Connection. Yusef Sayed on Sidney Lumet's The Offence. Kim Morgan on Stanley Kubrick's The Killing. And more. » - David Hudson
See full article at Keyframe »

'Babadook', 'Sullivan's Travels', 'Maps to the Stars' and More On DVD & Blu-ray This Week

The Babadook Along with It Follows, The Babadook is a bit of a re-energizer in the horror genre, delivering mood and atmosphere over jump scares and gore. I will say the little kid played by Noah Wiseman got on my damn nerves early and often, but overall this is an effective little feature. You can read my theatrical review here.

Sullivan's Travels (Criterion Collection) I am woefully behind on my Criterion reviews as I have been inundated with my day-to-day duties and screeners, but I will be catching up soon and Preson Sturges' Sullivan's Travels will be one of the first ones I get to. I have heard plenty about this movie, but never seen it myself. I can't wait to give it a look. Here's the description from Criterion: Tired of churning out lightweight comedies, Hollywood director John L. Sullivan (Joel McCrea) decides to make O Brother, Where Art Thouc--a serious,
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

'The Palm Beach Story' (Criterion Collection) Blu-ray Review

I recognized the greatness of Preston Sturges when I first saw The Lady Eve (1941). Sturges realizes the absurdity of his stories and he owns those absurdities for the sake of entertainment rather than attempting to twist them into something they aren't. In the case of romantic comedies, today's attempts at the genre find filmmakers over looking their absurdity and to do so, as a filmmaker, is to make a movie that's too heavy-handed, ignoring the necessary tone of such a film. How many times have you been watching a romantic comedy and things are bouncing along -- a joke here, a sexual escapade there -- all leading up to the inevitable misunderstanding or break-up of the central characters you knew was comingc At this point our minds have pretty much been trained to expect these moments and all that comes after them. We know the characters are going to get
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

Films Starring James Mason, Veronica Lake and Robert Mitchum Hit the Criterion Collection for April

  • Indiewire
Films Starring James Mason, Veronica Lake and Robert Mitchum Hit the Criterion Collection for April
The Criterion Collection has announced the selection of six titles to be released on Blu-ray and DVD in April, 2015. The Criterion editions will feature non-compressed audio files, digital picture restoration and each is accompanied by an essay from a prominent critic. Special edition interviewees and commentators include Martin Scorcese, Noah Baumbach and more. Synopses of the films below are courtesy of Criterion: "Sullivan's Travels"Tired of churning out lightweight comedies, Hollywood director John L. Sullivan ("The Palm Beach Story's" Joel McCrea) decides to make "O Brother, Where Art Thou?"—a serious, socially responsible film about human suffering. After his producers point out that he knows nothing of hardship, Sullivan hits the road disguised as a hobo. En route to enlightenment, he meets a lovely but no-nonsense young woman ("I Married a Witch's" Veronica Lake)—and more trouble than he ever dreamed of. This comic...
See full article at Indiewire »

The Collision: Episode 100 – Why We Love Talking about Movies

This week on The Collision, we have reached our 100th episode. To commemorate the milestone, we get to the most basic aspect of this podcast: why we love talking about movies. During our conversation, we explore how discussion enriches our understanding of movies, the means of expressing differing viewpoints, controversial opinions, dealing with hype, our favorite films, and so much more. It feels incredibly rewarding to have come this far, and I think this is one of the best episodes we've ever done. Our deepest thanks to all our listeners. Click here to listen to the new episode of The Collision, click here for the previous episode ("Guardians of the Galaxy and the Lack of Female-Led Superhero Movies"), click here to add the podcast to your RSS, and click here to find us on iTunes. To keep up to date with The Collision, you can follow us on Twitter at @MattGoldberg and @AdamChitwood.
See full article at Collider.com »

Warner Bros. Plans Greek Epic 'Odysseus' for Director Fedor Bondarchuk

Warner Bros. Plans Greek Epic 'Odysseus' for Director Fedor Bondarchuk
Stalingrad director Fedor Bondarchuk has signed on to direct Odysseus for Warner Bros., a large-scale epic adaptation of Homer's epic poem The Odyssey.

Jeremy Doner (The Killing) is writing the screenplay adaptation about the title character, the Greek king who starts his journey home after a decade of fighting in the Trojan War. Along his perilous trip home to Ithaca, Odysseus must battle cannibals, sea monsters, sirens and a cyclops, while his wife Penelope is being courted by a number of suitors in his absence.

Gianni Nunnari is producing through his Hollywood Gang production company, alongside Bernie Goldmann, Shannon Gaulding and Fedor Bondarchuk's producing partners Michael Schlicht and Paul Heth. No production schedule was given.

Warner Bros. previously adapted Homer's The Iliad, which covers the events of The Trojan War, into the 2004 adventure Troy, where Sean Bean played Odysseus. The Odyssey has been adapted for the big
See full article at MovieWeb »

Movies This Week: May 30-June 5, 2014

This weekend, the Austin Film Society has booked a 35mm print of Douglas Sirk's striking melodrama All That Heaven Allows for their new "Rebel Rebel" series at the Marchesa. One of my all-time favorites, the film screens tonight and Sunday afternoon. It is being released on Blu-ray next month from the fine folks at The Criterion Collection, but it's genuinely exciting to finally have a chance to finally see it projected on the big screen. On Monday evening, Afs is teaming up with The Nature Conservancy for a screening of Hanna Ranch, a documentary about a fourth-generation cattle ranch. Emily Hanna will be in attendance for the film. Powell and Pressburger's 1943 feature The Life And Death Of Colonel Blimp is screening Thursday evening at the Marchesa. The screening kicks off a new Essential Cinema series in June, "Films Of World War I."

The Paramount Summer Classic Film Series
See full article at Slackerwood »

Blu-ray Review: 'Sullivan's Travels'

  • CineVue
★★★★★ While screwball comedies may be known primarily for their fast wit and heartfelt romance, they're also significant for their engagement with the post-Depression American landscape. In many instances, this meant setting up unlikely relationships between millionaires and ordinary people to highlight the social gulf and to celebrate human resilience. Sullivan's Travels (1941), released on Blu-ray this week, saw comedy stalwart Preston Sturges aim for the social conscience of Frank Capra's more serious pictures, and come away with a film which not only portrayed the times beautifully, but also argued passionately for the value of cinema as a tonic for the downtrodden.
See full article at CineVue »
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