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First Image Of Crystal Reed As Sofia Falcone On Gotham Emerges

Knowing that Gotham is already set to mine the seemingly infinite well that is the Batman mythos even further by adding the likes of Professor Pyg to its roster this season, it comes as no surprise that other characters originating in the comics will be appearing as well. And while the focus of today’s conversation may not ring a bell with the average Joe, the more avid lovers of the source material among you will probably know who we’re talking about.

Not long ago, it was revealed that none other than Crystal Reed had been cast in the role of Sofia Falcone, a character featured in Jeph Loeb and Tim Sale’s masterworks, Batman: The Long Halloween and Dark Victory. And having already established that the former will serve as heavy inspiration for the first half of season 4, it seems only natural that she be included.

Interestingly enough,
See full article at We Got This Covered »

Is 1939 the Greatest Year Ever for Films?

  • Cinelinx
The film industry goes back to the beginning of the 20th century, and most experts still maintain that 1939 is the greatest single year in movie history. At no other point in the long chronicle of the film industry has Hollywood had such an ability to draw in and hold and audiences. Cinelinx looks at 1939.

In 1939, Americans bought an incrediblel 80 million movie tickets per week. There were 365 films released by the major studios in the United States during 1939. That’s an average of one film each a day. If you went to the theater every day, you’d never have to see the same movie twice. And the best part is that most of them were good.

The American Film Institute, along with such critics as Pauline Kael, Siskle & Ebert, Leonard Maltin and others have dubbed 1939 as the cinema's best single year ever. Looking back, its hard to argue with that opinion.
See full article at Cinelinx »

Comic Books 101: Batman -- Where To Begin Reading (Part 1)

  • LRM Online
So, you want to start reading Batman but are completely lost due to the character being around for over seventy-five years, and hundreds of issues and iterations on the character.

Where do you start? What If you only like some of the movie versions? Or maybe the video games?

What’s the New 52? What’s Rebirth?

It can be daunting if you are completely new to the world of comic books or maybe a returning fan that’s been away for a long time. While hardcore fans have probably stuck around for all the various Bat books, most maybe only keep up via Wiki or maybe random postings on sites like Cbr or IGN. Well, fear not, as I will be doing my best to give some insight on iconic Batman storylines essential to the character, along with a brief update on the current state of the character!

So without further ado,
See full article at LRM Online »

TV: Gotham: Season 3 to Introduce Mario Falcone

  • LRM Online
Gotham: Season 3 to Introduce Mario Falcone

June 23, 2016 – by Mark Cook

Following the news that Jamie Chung had been cast as Valerie Vale, Maggie Geha as an updated Poison Ivy, and rumors that casting for the Mad Hatter are currently in place, Fox has now cast James Carpinello as Mario Falcone. Carpinello is best known for his work in Person of Interest and The Good Wife.

First introduced in Jeph Loeb and Tim Sale’s Batman: Dark Victory, Mario Falcone is one of the sons of mob boss Carmine Falcone, who was set to be the heir to the Falcone Family.

Gotham: Season 3 looks to present Carpinello’s Mario Falcone as rejecting the family “business”, and looks to establish himself as an Ivy League alumni currently working as an ER doctor. He will also be used to create tension between Jim Gordon and Lee Thompkins’ relationship.

Will Mario Falcone truly establish
See full article at LRM Online »

A Month of Sundays helmer Matthew Saville preps Tampa film Dark Victory

  • IF.com.au
Matthew Saville on the Adelaide set of A Month of Sundays.

Felony director Matthew Saville is getting ready for the release of his new film.A Month of Sundays, starring Anthony Lapaglia and John Clarke as Adelaide real-estate agents.

The film will be released April 28 by Madman after festival runs at Tiff and Adelaide last year.

In between promotional duties, Saville is also looking ahead to what's next - even though, as he says, "I can't say what's next, because it's not really up to me".

"I'm developing a few projects but they're just really rough treatments and it's years before they're ready. The one that's furthest down the pipeline is an adaptation of a book by David Marr and Marian Wilkinson called Dark Victory, about the Tampa Crisis in 2001".

Dark Victory: How a Government Lied its Way to Political Triumph is the story of the Howard government's refusal to allow Norwegian frieghter Tampa,
See full article at IF.com.au »

11 Days Until Oscar! Trivia Party

I'm beginning to have butterflies. You? Just for fun some random trivia surrounding the number 11 today. Links go to previous articles here at Tfe on these films or performers

• Pictures with exactly 11 Oscar nominations

Mr Smith Goes to Washington (1939), Rebecca (1940), Sergeant York (1941), The Pride of the Yankees (1942), Sunset Blvd (1950), West Side Story (1961), Judgment at Nuremberg (1961), Oliver! (1968), The Godfather Pt II (1974), Chinatown (1974), The Turning Point (1977), Gandhi (1982), Terms of Endearment (1983), Amadeus (1984), A Passage to India (1984), Out of Africa (1985), The Color Purple (1985), Saving Private Ryan (1998), Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (2003), The Aviator (2004), Hugo (2011), and Life of Pi (2012)

• Movies that won exactly 11 Oscars

That's the most any movie has ever won and it's a three way tie: Ben-Hur (1959), Titanic (1997), The Lord of the Ring: Return of the King (2003). Currently Ben-Hur is being remade and is supposedly opening this very summer... wish them good luck because living up to such a
See full article at FilmExperience »

DVD Savant 2015 Favored Disc Roundup

or, Savant picks The Most Impressive Discs of 2015

This is the actual view from Savant Central, looking due North.

What a year! I was able to take one very nice trip back East too see Washington D.C. for the first time, or at least as much as two days' walking in the hot sun and then cool rain would allow. Back home in Los Angeles, we've had a year of extreme drought -- my lawn is looking patriotically ratty -- and we're expecting something called El Niño, that's supposed to be just shy of Old-Testament build-me-an-ark intensity. We withstood heat waves like those in Day the Earth Caught Fire, and now we'll get the storms part. This has been a wild year for DVD Savant, which is still a little unsettled. DVDtalk has been very patient and generous, and so have Stuart Galbraith & Joe Dante; so far everything
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Remembering Actress Gray: Underappreciated Film Noir Heroine

Coleen Gray actress ca. 1950. Coleen Gray: Actress in early Stanley Kubrick film noir, destroyer of men in cult horror 'classic' Actress Coleen Gray, best known as the leading lady in Stanley Kubrick's film noir The Killing and – as far as B horror movie aficionados are concerned – for playing the title role in The Leech Woman, died at age 92 in Aug. 2015. This two-part article, which focuses on Gray's film career, is a revised and expanded version of the original post published at the time of her death. Born Doris Bernice Jensen on Oct. 23, 1922, in Staplehurst, Nebraska, at a young age she moved with her parents, strict Lutheran Danish farmers, to Minnesota. After getting a degree from St. Paul's Hamline University, she relocated to Southern California to be with her then fiancé, an army private. At first, she eked out a living as a waitress at a La Jolla hotel
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Remembering Actress Gray: Underappreciated Film Noir Heroine

Coleen Gray actress ca. 1950. Coleen Gray: Actress in early Stanley Kubrick film noir, destroyer of men in cult horror 'classic' Actress Coleen Gray, best known as the leading lady in Stanley Kubrick's film noir The Killing and – as far as B horror movie aficionados are concerned – for playing the title role in The Leech Woman, died at age 92 in Aug. 2015. This two-part article, which focuses on Gray's film career, is a revised and expanded version of the original post published at the time of her death. Born Doris Bernice Jensen on Oct. 23, 1922, in Staplehurst, Nebraska, at a young age she moved with her parents, strict Lutheran Danish farmers, to Minnesota. After getting a degree from St. Paul's Hamline University, she relocated to Southern California to be with her then fiancé, an army private. At first, she eked out a living as a waitress at a La Jolla hotel
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Leigh Day on TCM: From Southern Belle in 'Controversial' Epic to Rape Victim in Code-Buster

Vivien Leigh ca. late 1940s. Vivien Leigh movies: now controversial 'Gone with the Wind,' little-seen '21 Days Together' on TCM Vivien Leigh is Turner Classic Movies' star today, Aug. 18, '15, as TCM's “Summer Under the Stars” series continues. Mostly a stage actress, Leigh was seen in only 19 films – in about 15 of which as a leading lady or star – in a movie career spanning three decades. Good for the relatively few who saw her on stage; bad for all those who have access to only a few performances of one of the most remarkable acting talents of the 20th century. This evening, TCM is showing three Vivien Leigh movies: Gone with the Wind (1939), 21 Days Together (1940), and A Streetcar Named Desire (1951). Leigh won Best Actress Academy Awards for the first and the third title. The little-remembered film in-between is a TCM premiere. 'Gone with the Wind' Seemingly all
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Off The Shelf – Episode 53 – New Releases For Tuesday, June 9th 2015

This week on Off The Shelf, Ryan is joined by Brian Saur to take a look at the new DVD and Blu-ray releases for the week of June 9th, 2015, and chat about some follow-up and home video news.

Subscribe in iTunes or RSS.

Episode Links & Notes

Follow-up

Brian finally sees Mad Max: Fury Road

News

What We Do In The Shadows Blu-ray announced for July 21st Kino Lorber / Studio Classics Announcements Lost Soul: The Doomed Journey of Richard Stalney’s Island of Dr. Moreau Documentary on Blu-ray Twilight Time September / October Line-up Scream Factory / Larry Fessenden Box Set Announcement

New Releases

Back to the Jurassic Coffy Dark Victory Foxy Brown Friday Foster Golden Years Collection Hammer Hunchback of Notre Dame The Last Unicorn Ninotchka Red Army The Sadistic Baron Von Klaus She-Devil Sleepaway Camp II: Unhappy Campers Society Spider Baby Strain The Duff Thunderbirds: The Complete Series

Episode Credits

Ryan Gallagher
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Time Machine: Bachchan and Rai - Bollywood King and Queen on Hollywood Red Carpet

Abhishek Bachchan and Aishwarya Rai at the Oscars Abhishek Bachchan and Aishwarya Rai on the Academy Awards' Red Carpet Pictured above are Bollywood stars Aishwarya Rai and Abhishek Bachchan arriving at the 2011 Academy Awards ceremony, which took place on Feb. 27 at the Kodak Theatre in Hollywood. Two years ago, an Anglo-Indian-American co-production, Danny Boyle's Slumdog Millionaire became not only one of the season's biggest sleeper hits, but also the eventual Best Picture Oscar winner. Dev Patel and Freida Pinto starred. Curiously, some have complained that Slumdog Millionaire was just a less interesting rehash of higher-quality Bollywood musicals and dramas that have received relatively little play outside South Asian communities around the globe. Abhishek Bachchan and Aishwarya Rai movies The son of Indian cinema legend Amitabh Bachchan, Abhishek Bachchan has been featured in nearly 50 films. Among them are: Dhoom (2004). Director: Sanjay Gadhvi. Cast: Abhishek Bachchan. Uday Chopra. John Abraham. Esha Deol.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Tcmff 2015: ‘Nightmare Alley’ is an under-appreciated Carny-Noir

Nightmare Alley

Written by Jules Furthman

Directed by Edmund Goulding

U.S.A., 1947

A carny cons his way up to high society through cold-reading and (un)timely circumstance. Based on that one-liner, who would you cast? If you say Tyrone Power, I’d say that my friend Stan Carlisle is on his way (The name Stan Carlisle being a con-industry handshake of sorts, informing one con-artist that he’s stepping in on another man’s con, or at least according to Eddie “The Czar of Noir” Muller’s introduction of this film at Tcmff). In Nightmare Alley, Tyrone Power, the 20th Century Fox matinee idol, plays a lowlife con man, who lies and cheats his way from a podunk carnival to becoming a spiritualist amongst the more gullible of Chicago’s upper crust. His character is also the namesake of the above con slang.

And any which way, yes, Tyrone Power
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Film Review: ‘The Frontier’

Film Review: ‘The Frontier’
A woman on the run, a last-chance motel and a lonely stretch of desert highway set the stage for “The Frontier,” an appreciably moody but dramatically stilted crime drama that exudes a certain retro appeal before collapsing into a series of empty neo-noir poses. The debut narrative feature for Israeli-born Oren Shai shows much affection for all things pulp, but a less steady hand with performance and pacing. Some modest festival play should follow the film’s SXSW premiere, before it disappears into that vast American indie abyss known as VOD.

The central figure here is Laine (Jocelin Donahue), a classical femme fatale in the “Psycho”/”Gone Girl” mold, who turns up at the Frontier, a dust-caked motel on the outskirts of Phoenix, with deep bruises on her neck and blood on her hands, looking for a place to clean up and maybe lie low for a while. The TV
See full article at Variety - Film News »

The Frontier | 2015 SXSW Film Festival Review

  • ioncinema
Too Late For Tears: Shai Plumbs the Depths of B-Noir Devices for Punchy Debut

A brunette with bloody fingers shakily inhales the fumes of a cigarette in the opening sequences of Oren Shai’s directorial debut, The Frontier, a title that evokes the desolation of a vintage Western. But this musty, dusty period narrative concerning shady folks doing very bad things in an isolated outpost in the middle of nowhere is a snug throwback to the B film-noirs that used to be spackled into double feature zingers at the local matinee. Not one of Shai’s motley, if generally entertaining crew, qualifies as the proverbial ‘good person,’ but he manages to instill the same sense of investment in a beautiful but morally compromised femme fatale as those films from a bygone era. Though its production value sometimes belies a stingy budget with amateurish sting, Shai manages to distract from
See full article at ioncinema »

Warner Home Entertainment Announces "The Golden Year Collection" Blu-ray Set

  • CinemaRetro
Cinema Retro has received the following press release:

Revisit 1939, Hollywood’s Greatest Year, with 4 New Blu-ray™ Debuts

The Golden Year Collection June 9

Features Newly Restored Blu-ray Debut of The Hunchback of Notre Dame, Starring Charles Laughton, and Blu-ray Debuts of – Bette DavisDark Victory, Errol Flynn’s Dodge City and Greta Garbo’s Ninotchka. Collection also includes Gone With the Wind.

Burbank, Calif. March 10, 2015 – On June 9, Warner Bros. Home Entertainment will celebrate one of the most prolific twelve months in Hollywood’s history with the 6-disc The Golden Year Collection. Leading the five-film set will be the Blu-ray debut of

The Hunchback of Notre Dame, in a new restoration which will have its world premiere at TCM’s Classic Film Festival beginning March 26 in Los Angeles. Charles Laughton and Maureen O’Hara star in Victor Hugo’s tragic tale which William Dieterle directed.

The other films featured in the Wbhe
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Week in Review: Academy considering move back to 5 Best Picture nominees

The experiment has failed. The Oscars simply don’t work. And no, I’m not just continuing to vent my frustration over Boyhood losing.

For the last six years, The Academy has experimented with a different number of Best Picture nominees, starting with 10, then a variable number between five and 10 based on first place votes.

That experiment could now be coming to an end. The Hollywood Reporter floated the rumor Tuesday that the Academy is seriously considering switching back to five nominees for Best Picture, and that the motion has support with a “significant fraction of the Academy”.

This is speculation at the moment, as the Academy’s Board of Governors isn’t set to meet until March 24. That said, this year’s Oscar ratings were down by 15 percent from last year, despite having one of the year’s biggest box office hits in American Sniper up for Best Picture
See full article at SoundOnSight »

If You Love This Year's Oscar Winners, Watch These Four Similar Nominees Next

  • Hitfix
If You Love This Year's Oscar Winners, Watch These Four Similar Nominees Next
There's only one rule as far as the kinds of performance that get nominated for Oscars go: Someone has already been nominated for a role just like it. While it was thrilling to watch Julianne Moore, Eddie Redmayne, Patricia Arquette, and Jk Simmons pick up expected Oscars for their work this year, it cannot be denied that many of their roles have obvious Oscar forebears. Here are four performances you should watch next if you loved "Still Alice," "The Theory of Everything," "Boyhood," and "Whiplash."  If you liked Julianne Moore in "Still Alice," watch Bette Davis in "Dark Victory" Julianne Moore copes with the inevitability of a devastating condition in "Still Alice," and her decline is both grim and undeniably cinematic. Her emotional and physical transformations serve as the movie's entire plot, and her family's shifting response to her progressing Alzheimer's is just as compelling. In Oscar history, we actually
See full article at Hitfix »

From Kubrick to Marilyn Monroe, Oscar Has a Stellar List of Shut-Outs

From Kubrick to Marilyn Monroe, Oscar Has a Stellar List of Shut-Outs
There are 195 individuals nominated for Oscar this year. And when the winners are named Feb. 22, they will become part of film history, joining such greats as Billy Wilder, Ingrid Bergman, Ben Hecht and Walt Disney.

But 80% of the contenders will go home empty-handed. However, there is good news: They are in good company as well.

Here is a sampling of nominees that didn’t win: “Citizen Kane,” “Chinatown” and “Star Wars”; directors Alfred Hitchcock, Howard Hawks, Stanley Kubrick and Ingmar Bergman; writers Tennessee Williams, Arthur Miller, Dashiell Hammett, John Steinbeck, Graham Greene, Harold Pinter and David Mamet; actors Gloria Swanson in “Sunset Blvd.”; Audrey Hepburn in “Breakfast at Tiffany’s”; and Peter O’Toole in “Lawrence of Arabia.”

They managed to do Ok, though.

It’s hard to say why they didn’t win. Sometimes tastes change. Sometimes there’s too much competition in one year. Frank Capra’s 1939 “Mr. Smith Goes to Washington
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Saville shoots fast on comedy-drama

  • IF.com.au
DoP Mark Wareham with Matthew Saville with Anthony Lapaglia.

.

On paper the shooting schedule sounded logistically daunting: 20 days for a feature film starring Anthony Lapaglia, Justine Clarke, Julia Blake and John Clarke.

As it turned out, filming comedic drama A Month of Sundays in Adelaide proved relatively easy, much to the surprise of writer-director Matthew Saville.

.Thanks to the cast, crew and logistic simplicity of shooting in Adelaide, it all went very smoothly,. Saville tells If during a break from the editing suite.

Produced by Madman Production Company.s Nick Batzias and Kirsty Stark, the film stars Lapaglia as Frank Mollard, a real estate agent whose life takes an unexpected turn when he receives a call from his dead mother, sending him on a journey of redemption.

Justine Clarke plays Frank.s estranged wife, with John Clarke as his boss/friend and Blake as the woman at the heart of a life-changing new relationship.
See full article at IF.com.au »
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