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Leonard Landy, ‘Our Gang’ Actor, Dies at 84

Leonard Landy, ‘Our Gang’ Actor, Dies at 84
Leonard Landy, best known for his work as one of the Little Rascals on “Our Gang,” died Wednesday. He was 84.

Often recognized for his freckled face and big ears, Landy (second from left in the photo) appeared in 21 “Our Gang” comedy shorts, debuting in “Feed ‘Em and Weep” in 1938 and culminating with “Fightin’ Fools” in 1941.

Our Gang,” a series of comedy short films about a group of poor neighborhood children and their adventures, began in 1922 as a series of silent shorts. When it was converted to sound in 1929, Landy was known for watching the action with an occasional one liner.

Landy also appeared in the 1950s version of the comedy series, which was later syndicated for television and re-titled “The Little Rascals.” Hal Roach produced both productions.

In total, “Our Gang” featured over 41 child actors. Actors from the series who are still living include Lassie Lou Ahern, Robert Blake, Margaret Kerry, Sidney Kibrick and Mildred Kornman.

In
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Leonard Landy, ‘Our Gang’ Actor, Dies at 84

Leonard Landy, ‘Our Gang’ Actor, Dies at 84
Leonard Landy, best known for his work as one of the Little Rascals on “Our Gang,” died Wednesday. He was 84.

Often recognized for his freckled face and big ears, Landy appeared in 21 “Our Gang” comedy shorts, debuting in “Feed ‘Em and Weep” in 1938 and culminating with “Fightin’ Fools” in 1941.

Our Gang,” a series of comedy short films about a group of poor neighborhood children and their adventures, began in 1922 as a series of silent shorts and they were created with sound in 1929. Landy was known for watching the action with an occasional one liner.

In the 1950s, the comedy series were syndicated for television and re-titled “The Little Rascals.” Hal Roach produced both productions.

In total, “Our Gang” featured over 41 child actors. Actors from the series who are still living include Lassie Lou Ahern, Robert Blake, Margaret Kerry, Sidney Kibrick and Mildred Kornman.

In 1980, Landy acted in an “Our Gang” reunion sponsored by The Sons of the Desert. He
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Patrick Stewart on the Joy of Being Whipped with Wet Towels

Patrick Stewart on the Joy of Being Whipped with Wet Towels
During the first season of Star Trek: The Next Generation, Patrick Stewart – who played the show's dramatically serious, almost Shakespearean Captain Jean-Luc Picard – said something he has always regretted. A veteran of serious theater, the actor projected a grave sobriety off-camera as well as on, so when fellow cast member Denise Crosby attempted to crack his exterior, saying, "Come on, Patrick, we've got to have fun sometimes," he blew up. "'We're not here to have fun,' that was my line," the actor says. "I yelled it. What an asshole.
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Laurel And Hardy Celebration, August 8th In New York City

  • CinemaRetro
The Sons of the Desert, the international organization founded to celebrate the works of Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy, will hold a 50th anniversary banquet at the famed Lambs Club in New York City on August 8. The Sons of the Desert (named after one of Laurel and Hardy's classic feature film comedies) was founded in 1965 with the blessing of Stan Laurel shortly before his death. Since then the organization's local chapters (known as  "tents" ) meet regularly in various locations around the globe. This 50th anniversary celebration is not only open to members of the Sons of the Desert but to the general public as well. Guests will include legendary horror show host John Zacherle ("The Cool Ghoul"), famed comedic actor Larry Storch as well as Jerry Tucker, the last surviving member of the Our Gang comedies. The emcee will be Cinema Retro's own Doug Gerbino, a lifelong historian of Laurel and Hardy.
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Sons of the Desert at 50

The founding “tent” of the international Laurel and Hardy organization Sons of the Desert is about to celebrate its 50th anniversary with a banquet in New York City on August 8th—but only if enough people sign up to attend. That’s the message that Grand Sheik Jack Roth has asked me to spread. You can learn more at www.sonsofthedesertnyc.org. I’m sorry I can’t travel back East that weekend, but the mere thought of this event makes me nostalgic, as I did attend the 2nd banquet forty-nine years ago; it was one of the greatest nights of my life. I still have some snapshots, overflashed with my parents’ Brownie camera, but they do provide some memories of having met Stan Laurel’s...

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See full article at Leonard Maltin's Movie Crazy »

‘The Matrix,’ ‘Dirty Harry,’ and More Added to National Film Registry

We’ve lost something close to 3/4 of black and white films. It’s easy to imagine that we have all of them at our fingertips, and that they’ll be there forever, but that’s simply not the reality, and it’s a good reminder of what can happen if we’re not careful. That’s part of why the work of the National Film Registry is so vital. They ensure that a large number of time-tested films survive to test even more time. This year, as usual, they’ve selected 25 flicks to preserve including The Matrix, Breakfast at Tiffany’s, Dirty Harry, and A Christmas Story (which will also be preserved 24-hours a day as long as TBS still exists). The Library of Congress has also saved Delmer Daves’ 3:10 to Yuma (1957); Otto Preminger’s Anatomy of a Murder; George Cukor’s Born Yesterday; Penny Marshall’s A League of Their Own; Richard Linklater’s Slacker
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

Classic Comedy Toppers

A movie collectible doesn’t have to be old to appeal to me: it simply has to evoke happy thoughts of a film I care about. I never dreamed anyone would reproduce the fezzes worn by Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy in their classic 1933 comedy Sons of the Desert…but that’s just what Fez-o-Rama has done, along with a model that bears the symbol of Freedonia, the mythical kingdom depicted in the Marx Brothers comedy gem Duck Soup, also from 1933. (I don’t think anyone actually wears such a hat in the film, to the best of my recollection, but let’s not split hairs—pun intended. The fez looks great and so does the Freedonia emblem.) Apparently, the folks at...

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See full article at Leonard Maltin's Movie Crazy »

Forgotten Pre-Codes: "Sing and Like It" (1934)

  • MUBI
Part of a series by David Cairns on forgotten pre-Code films.

"Crime must not pay" is one of the most debilitating rules the Hays Code imposed on Hollywood. It's relatively easy for a filmmaker to work around crazy bans on words ("pregnant"), body parts (gone, all those extreme-longshot buttocks) or gestures (Frank McHugh raises a finger in Parachute Jumper), but when a philosophical ideal is given the weight of narrative law, cinema is forced back into the nursery. The filmmakers operating under this draconian blue pencil developed devious skills to bypass rulings and imply rather than say the unsayable, and it arguably helped their craft, but at the same time, certain kinds of stories just become impossible to tell honestly.

And certain kinds of fun were ruled out too, like much of what happens in Sing and Like It, directed by the lightly likable William A. Seiter, who clocked up well over a hundred films,
See full article at MUBI »

Are These The Top 100 Comedies Of All Time?

  • Slash Film
Are These The Top 100 Comedies Of All Time?
From time to time, major organizations such as the AFI give us lists of the best movies of all time. There's some kind of grand countdown from 100 to 1 and then we debate for a few days over how low this one was ranked or why was another ranked too high. And most of the time, we rarely get a glimpse behind the process. Time Out London has just released their list of the 100 Best Comedies Of All Time but have done it in a fun and uniquely transparent way. They surveyed over 200 people who work in, with, or around comedy and asked them for their top tens. Then they averaged all those lists together to come up with the top 100. The best part, though, is that all the lists are public. So instead of just listing the 100 best comedies of all time, we can also find out which ten comedies
See full article at Slash Film »

From the archive, 15 August 1977: Lonesome pining

Originally published in the Guardian on 15 August 1977

Twelve years after his death, Stan Laurel has somehow managed to get the little Cumbria town of Ulverston into another fine mess. Stanley Arthur Jefferson didn't know what he was letting the place in for when he was born there in 1890. The comedian who found fame as the skinny, snivelling half of Laurel and Hardy was brought up by his maternal grandmother at 3 Argyll Street for the first six years of his life.

And last week Ulverston decided to put on a Grand Stan Laurel Exhibition. Ulverston's Most Famous Son, trumpeted the hoardings – until somebody pointed out that Councillor So-and-so, of fragrant memory, who introduced Belisha beacons to the town in 1952, or perhaps did something else even worthier, was more relevant to Ulverston than a dead film comic who disappeared off to America and, moreover, was married several times and was reputed to drink.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Podcast: Dave Kehr, Critic!

  • MUBI
Two days ago, David Phelps and I had the privilege to sit down and talk to Dave Kehr, who we consider to be one of America's best film critics.  Luckily for us all, Kehr is still writing criticism; he currently writes regularly for the New York Times and casually hosts a small and impassioned film discussion community on his website, davekehr.com.  He is now publishing a wonderful book of his criticism from the 1970s and 1980s in a collection called "When Movies Mattered: Reviews from a Transformative Decade", which includes terrific pieces on City of Pirates, Raoul Walsh (re-printed here), Risky Business, Carl Th. Dreyer, When a Woman Ascends the Stairs, and many more.  It is essential reading: crisp, clear prose that leads the reader through a film or a filmmaker's work, characterizing and encapsulating, providing evidence simply, accurately, and expressively.  On the occasion of the book's publication, the
See full article at MUBI »

AFI's 100 Years ... 100 Movie Quotes

  • Extra
AFI's 100 Years ... 100 Movie Quotes
In honor of the 83rd Academy Awards, Extra" brings you AFI's 100 Best Movie Quotes of all time! From "The Wizard of Oz" to "Taxi Driver," see if your favorites made the list.

AFI's 100 Years...100 Movie QuotesGone with the Wind (1939)

"Frankly, my dear, I don't give a damn." — Clark Gable as Rhett Butler to Vivien Leigh as Scarlett O'Hara

The Godfather (1972)

"I'm going to make him an offer he can't refuse." — Marlon Brando as Don Corleone
See full article at Extra »

Our comedy 25: speaking 'the language of funny'? | Xan Brooks

Wot, no Happiness?! And where's Preston Sturges? Have your say on our critics' list of the 25 greatest comedy films of all time

• Datablog: download the full list

Preston Sturges's Sullivan's Travels spun the tale a successful comedy director who wants to make big, serious pictures about the issues that matter. With this in mind, he sets out to "know trouble" first-hand, venturing off on a Depression-era odyssey that takes him from hobo to criminal. Alongside his fellow convicts, our hero is finally ushered into a prison screening of the Playful Pluto cartoon and belatedly understands why comedy matters, and why there are few professions more worthwhile than making people laugh.

This is an argument that was picked up by Woody Allen in Hannah and Her Sisters (in which our hero is saved from an existential crisis after visiting a Marx brothers movie) and again by Peter Bradshaw in his
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Buster Keaton, Night Of The Living Dead, Young Frankenstein: Packard Campus Oct. 2010 Schedule

Cary Grant, Irene Dunne, Alida Valli, Angela Lansbury, The Man Who Laughs: Packard Campus Oct. 2010 Packard Campus schedule and film synopses (via press release): Friday, October 1 (7:30 p.m.) BBC Sunday Night Play: Colombe (BBC-tv, 1960) Library of Congress Discovers Lost British TV Treasures Based on the original Broadway production of the play "Mademoiselle Colombe" by Jean Anouilh. Directed by Naomi Capon. With Sean Connery & Dorothy Tutin.  Black & White, 102 min.   Saturday, October 2 (7:30 p.m.) Sons Of The Desert (Hal Roach-MGM, 1933) When Stan and Ollie trick their wives into thinking that they are taking a medicinal cruise while they're actually going to a convention, the wives find out the truth the hard way. Comedy.  Directed by William A. Seiter. With Stan Laurel, Oliver Hardy and Charley Chase.  Black & White, 68 min.   Also on the program: Maids ala Mode (Hal Roach, 1933) starring Zasu Pitts [...]
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Laurel And Hardy Film Festival And Pie Fight At Redford Theatre, Detroit

  • CinemaRetro
 

If you're anywhere near the Redford Theatre in Detroit this weekend, August 27-28, don't miss the big Laurel and Hardy film festival. Showing on the big screen: Sons of the Desert, Liberty, Second 100 Years, Two Tars and Soup to Nuts. On Friday night, the Dancing Cuckoos "tent" of the Laurel and Hardy appreciation society, The Sons of the Desert, will be staging a pie fight in the parking lot! Bring plenty of paper towels...Click here for details (Click here for info on joining The Sons of the Desert)
See full article at CinemaRetro »

AFI's 100 Years ... 100 Movie Quotes

  • Extra
AFI's 100 Years ... 100 Movie Quotes
"Extra" brings you AFI's 100 Best Movie Quotes of all time! From "The Wizard of Oz" to "Taxi Driver," see if your favorites made the list!

AFI's 100 Years...100 Movie QuotesGone with the Wind (1939)

"Frankly, my dear, I don't give a damn." --Said by Clark Gable as Rhett Butler to Vivien Leigh as Scarlett O'Hara.

The Godfather (1972)

"I'm going to make him an offer he can't refuse." --Marlon Brando as Don Corleone.

On the Waterfront (1954)

"You don't understand!
See full article at Extra »

AFI's 100 Years ...100 Movie Quotes

  • Extra
AFI's 100 Years ...100 Movie Quotes
"Extra" brings you AFI's 100 Best Movie Quotes of all time! From "The Wizard of Oz" to "Taxi Driver," see if your favorites made the list!

AFI's 100 Years...100 Movie QuotesGone with the Wind (1939)

“Frankly, my dear, I don't give a damn.” —Said by Clark Gable as Rhett Butler to Vivien Leigh as Scarlett O’Hara.

The Godfather (1972)

“I’m going to make him an offer he can’t refuse.” —Marlon Brando as Don Corleone.

On the Waterfront (1954)

“You don’t understand!
See full article at Extra »

See also

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