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'Arrow's Season 5 Finale Brings Oliver's Journey Full Circle and Ends on a Jaw-Dropping Cliffhanger

'Arrow's Season 5 Finale Brings Oliver's Journey Full Circle and Ends on a Jaw-Dropping Cliffhanger
Warning: Spoiler alert! Do not proceed if you haven’t watched Arrow’s epic season five finale!

Did Arrow just kill, um, everyone?!

The CW’s Og superhero drama came full circle on Wednesday's season finale, returning Oliver Queen (Stephen Amell) -- and literally every other person in his life -- back to Lian Yu, the deadly island in the South China Sea where, five years ago, a shipwrecked playboy emerged as the vigilante that would become the Green Arrow.

Oliver and his motley crew of enemies-turned-allies -- Nyssa al Ghul (Katrina Law), Malcolm Merlyn (John Barrowman), Digger Harkness (Nick E. Tarabay) and Slade Wilson (Manu Bennett) -- traveled to the island in pursuit of the Green Arrow’s actual friends and loved ones, all of whom were being held as pawns in Adrian Chase’s twisted game of vengeance. After a double cross or two, an unexpected sacrifice (Merlyn, in his one
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

'Arrow' Star and Ep Dish on the Shocking Prometheus Reveal and 'Psychological Torture' to Come for Oliver

'Arrow' Star and Ep Dish on the Shocking Prometheus Reveal and 'Psychological Torture' to Come for Oliver
Warning: Spoiler alert! Do not proceed if you haven’t watched this week’s Arrow! If you know Prometheus’ true identity, carry on.

Arrow’s season five big bad was finally unmasked on Wednesday’s episode, revealing the villainous Prometheus to be none other than Star City District Attorney Adrian Chase!

The no-nonsense Da had seemed to be one of Oliver Queen’s (Stephen Amell) closest allies as mayor, but after a battle with another Arrow unknown, Vigilante, Chase (Josh Segarra) removed his Prometheus mask to reveal his true identity as the cold-blooded killer whose only goal is to ruin Oliver’s life after suffering a loss at the hands of his season one persona, The Hood.

“We really did want to, this season, build a villain that would be a dark mirror for Oliver, in the tradition of the comic books,” Arrow Ep Wendy Mericle explained on a conference call with reporters last week. “Really honoring
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

Arrow Recap: Breaking In

Arrow Recap: Breaking In
This week on The CW’s Arrow, while Oliver was away, the new recruits got to play… with fire. Once the smoke cleared, which team member was left in the lurch?

RelatedArrow Boss Talks Suicide Squad Cameo, Felicity’s Secrets and More

I was not a fan of this episode. It felt 90 minutes long. I “get” what it was trying to do, but I don’t think it was done terribly well. And there is just something about the new collection of recruits that hasn’t “clicked” for me yet, not enough that I am greatly invested in their need to “belong,
See full article at TVLine.com »

Arrow Boss on That Suicide Squad Cameo, Felicity's Secrets and More

Arrow Boss on That Suicide Squad Cameo, Felicity's Secrets and More
This week on The CW’s Arrow, Oliver had in his sights the distributor of a designer drug dubbed Stardust, though new recruit Rene aka Wild Dog got antsy and took on the baddie, Derek Sampson, himself — in a way that “royally pissed off” new D.A. Adrian Chase.

RelatedArrow Episode 100: Who Else Is Returning?

Sampson not only survived his scuffle with Wild Dog, he walked away from his dunk in a chemical cocktail impervious to pain, emboldening him to brush off his first clash with Green Arrow and then plot to take on rising gang lord Tobias Church,
See full article at TVLine.com »

The Final Years of King Baggot – From the ‘King of the Movies’ to Bit Player

The King Baggot Tribute will take place Wednesday September 28th at 7pm at Lee Auditorium inside the Missouri History Museum (Lindell and DeBaliviere in Forest Park, St. Louis, Missouri). The 1913 silent film Ivanhoe will be accompanied by The Rats and People Motion Picture Orchestra and there will be a 40-minute illustrated lecture on the life and career of King Baggot by We Are Movie Geeks’ Tom Stockman. A Facebook invite for the event can be found Here

Here’s a look at the final phase of King Baggot’s career.

King Baggot, the first ‘King of the Movies’ died July 11th, 1948 penniless and mostly forgotten at age 68. A St. Louis native, Baggot was at one time Hollywood’s most popular star, known is his heyday as “The Most Photographed Man in the World” and “More Famous Than the Man in the Moon”. Yet even in his hometown, Baggot had faded into obscurity.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

From the ‘King of the Movies’ to Bit Player – the Final Years of King Baggot

The King Baggot Tribute will take place Friday, November 14th at Webster University’s Moore Auditorium beginning at 7pm as part of this year’s St. Louis Intenational FIlm Festival. The program will consist a rare 35mm screening of the 1913 epic Ivanhoe starring King Baggot with live music accompaniment by the Rats and People Motion Picture Orchestra. Ivanhoe will be followed by an illustrated lecture on the life and films of King Baggot presented by Tom Stockman, editor here at We Are Movie Geeks. After that will screen the influential silent western Tumbleweeds (1925), considered to be one of King Baggot’s finest achievements as a director. Tumbleweeds will feature live piano accompaniment by Matt Pace.

Here’s a look at the final phase of King Baggot’s career.

King Baggot, the first ‘King of the Movies’ died July 11th, 1948 penniless and mostly forgotten at age 68. A St. Louis native, Baggot
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Which is the greatest British film in history? No one seems to be in agreement

Best British movies of all time? (Image: a young Michael Caine in 'Get Carter') Ten years ago, Get Carter, starring Michael Caine as a dangerous-looking London gangster (see photo above), was selected as the United Kingdom's very best movie of all time according to 25 British film critics polled by Total Film magazine. To say that Mike Hodges' 1971 thriller was a surprising choice would be an understatement. I mean, not a David Lean epic or an early Alfred Hitchcock thriller? What a difference ten years make. On Total Film's 2014 list, published last May, Get Carter was no. 44 among the magazine's Top 50 best British movies of all time. How could that be? Well, first of all, people would be very naive if they took such lists seriously, whether we're talking Total Film, the British Film Institute, or, to keep things British, Sight & Sound magazine. Second, whereas Total Film's 2004 list was the result of a 25-critic consensus,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

'Devious Maids': Was Flora Pregnant When She Died?

'Devious Maids': Was Flora Pregnant When She Died?
Marisol's investigation into the death of Flora came up with some juicy evidence on "Devious Maids" this week. She found a pregnancy test in Flora's room. While the other maids seemed reluctant to open up to her about Flora, Rosie finally cracked and confirmed it. She said that it was part of Flora's plan.

“That’s what she wanted," Rosie said. "To have a millionaire’s baby.”

Marisol hit a temporary roadblock, though, when the coroner's report came back saying that Flora was not pregnant at the time of her death. But the eagle-eyed Marisol noticed that the coroner's report had been changed. Then, in a stroke of luck, she recognized him at the police station. He was a friend of Adrian's, making Adrian look even more guilty.

While the investigation into Flora's death continues, Zap2It points out that “just because she's dead doesn't mean she was good.
See full article at Huffington Post »

Doctor Who: 25 stories that deserve more love

Cameron K McEwan Aug 16, 2016

Cameron sings the praises of 25 classic and modern Doctor Who adventures that went underappreciated. See what made the cut below...

Doctor Who fans can be an odd bunch at times (and by that I mean all the time), what's gold to one is dross to another. And when you think everyone is agreed on a genuine stinker (Timelash, for example), you'll find it has admirers in abundance. But what's here are some of the stories that, for whatever reason, get overlooked, underseen and, perhaps, undervalued - in no particular order.

The Awakening

Two-parters often get forgotten about (in classic Doctor Who at any rate) and this Peter Davison story, whilst perhaps best known to Who fans for a famous blooper featuring a horse, has some tremendous imagery and beautiful location shooting. Best of all is the villain of the piece, The Malus, who put the willies
See full article at Den of Geek »

25 underappreciated Doctor Who stories

Feature Cameron K McEwan 26 Apr 2013 - 07:00

Cameron sings the praises of twenty-five classic and modern Doctor Who adventures that deserve more love. See what made the cut below...

Doctor Who fans can be an odd bunch at times (and by that I mean all the time), what's gold to one is dross to another. And when you think everyone is agreed on a genuine stinker (Timelash, for example), you'll find it has admirers in abundance. But what's here are some of the stories that, for whatever reason, get overlooked, underseen and, perhaps, undervalued - in no particular order.

The Awakening

Two-parters often get forgotten about (in classic Doctor Who at any rate) and this Peter Davison story, whilst perhaps best known to Who fans for a famous blooper featuring a horse, has some tremendous imagery and beautiful location shooting. Best of all is the villain of the piece, The Malus,
See full article at Den of Geek »

Review: 'Mary Pickford: The Muse Of The Movies' An Adoring Look At America's Sweetheart

What does it mean to be on the A-list? In addition to being a box office draw, which is a must, those within that rareified air can often call the shots creatively on their own movies, command a high salary and even develop their own projects. But while she's primarily remembered now as "America's sweetheart" or "The girl with curls," few actors then or now have had the popularity, power and influence of silent film star Mary Pickford. One of early cinema's hugest box office draws, an innovator in film acting, a founder of a major studio and a pop culture icon whose image still resonates to this day, Nicholas Eliopoulos' "Mary Pickford: Muse Of The Movies" is a loving tribute and expansive look at Pickford's life, loves and career.

The masterstroke of this documentary that sets it apart from your standard clip montage intercut with talking heads and voiceover narration,
See full article at The Playlist »

Preview: ABC Family Monday Night Soaps Secret Life & Switched At Birth

Determined to get pregnant again, Adrian goes to her doctor, where she has an epiphany about what and whom she truly wants in life, on The Secret Life Of The American Teenager, premiering on Monday, August 8 (8:00 – 9:00 p.m. Et/Pt).

In the one-hour episode, “Flip Flop,” Adrian is convinced she wants to have another baby, until she begins to weigh her options. Quickly, she discovers it is not Ben she wants, but Ricky, in turn asking Ben to move out and end their marriage – but will Ben go along with the plan?

Knowing what Adrian is after, Amy cannot help but feel threatened and begins to doubt Ricky’s ability to stay faithful. Meanwhile, Nora decides to rent a room from George to try and get back on her feet.

The series cast includes Shailene Woodley, Ken Baumann, Mark Derwin, India Eisley, Greg Finley, Daren Kagasoff, Megan Park,
See full article at We Love Soaps »

The Zoo, and Alan Titchmarsh's Garden Secrets l TV review

There's plenty of bad news in life at the zoo, redness of tooth and claw and all that, writes Sam Wollaston

I have various cycle routes to work. On one I often spot warthog and wild dog, another almost guarantees giraffe and sometimes okapi. Not because the Guardian has, in an effort to cut costs, moved to the Serengeti. But because these routes take me past London Zoo.

It's been a while – probably about 30 years – since I went in. Now The Zoo (ITV1) is taking me inside, saving me the £19 entry fee.

Actually, I think that when an animal is in a cage or an enclosure, then the grammatical rule for game – that it shall always be referred to in the singular, however many there are – no longer applies. These are warthogs and giraffes; capture at least entitles them to individuality.

Sometimes they deserve a name as well, such as Yeboah,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

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