The Unknown (1927) - News Poster

(1927)

News

‘Chappaquiddick,’ ‘Logan’s Syndrome’ Headline Carmel Film Festival

The Carmel International Film Festival, running Oct. 18-22, may only be entering its 9th year of existence, but for co-founders Erin Clark and Tom Burns there are already enough stories about the event to go around. Of course, there was the time that the portable screen on the beach punctured during the middle of a movie.

“It was like the Wicked Witch in ‘The Wizard of Oz’ it just kind of went down,” says Clark. “And you have 350 people on the beach watching this. And we get a phone call telling us, ‘We have a problem.’ O.K., because, you can’t be everywhere at once, right?”

It goes without saying that while Clark and Burns realized it was fun in theory, in reality, the windy Pacific coast was best served for parties and special events as opposed to a temporary screening venue. Fast forward to 2017 and Carmel has grown to four indoor venues, including the 700-seat
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Film Festival Roundup: Sun-Ray Cinema Unveils Sleeping Giant Fest, Sfiff Announces Closing Night and More

  • Indiewire
Film Festival Roundup: Sun-Ray Cinema Unveils Sleeping Giant Fest, Sfiff Announces Closing Night and More
Keep up with the always-hopping film festival world with our weekly Film Festival Roundup column. Check out last week’s Roundup right here.

Lineup Announcements

– Exclusive: Over the last five years, Jacksonville, Florida’s Sun-Ray Cinema has carved out a unique space for adventurous film programming while also reinventing how audiences enjoy blockbuster fare in Northeast Florida. Building on those successes, Sun-Ray has now unveiled their Sleeping Giant Fest. From March 30 – April 2, Sleeping Giant Fest promises to “open your eyes and perk your ears to work that often gets lost in the digital streams that dominate our viewing habits today.” The festival aims “to help you navigate an array of choices that often seems dizzying so you can immerse yourself in these so-called ‘less commercial’ films, repertory titles, and screenings with exciting special guests while enjoying the communal experience that the cinema provides.

With forty film and music events over four lively days,
See full article at Indiewire »

The Final Years of King Baggot – From the ‘King of the Movies’ to Bit Player

The King Baggot Tribute will take place Wednesday September 28th at 7pm at Lee Auditorium inside the Missouri History Museum (Lindell and DeBaliviere in Forest Park, St. Louis, Missouri). The 1913 silent film Ivanhoe will be accompanied by The Rats and People Motion Picture Orchestra and there will be a 40-minute illustrated lecture on the life and career of King Baggot by We Are Movie Geeks’ Tom Stockman. A Facebook invite for the event can be found Here

Here’s a look at the final phase of King Baggot’s career.

King Baggot, the first ‘King of the Movies’ died July 11th, 1948 penniless and mostly forgotten at age 68. A St. Louis native, Baggot was at one time Hollywood’s most popular star, known is his heyday as “The Most Photographed Man in the World” and “More Famous Than the Man in the Moon”. Yet even in his hometown, Baggot had faded into obscurity.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Listen to the Score for The Unknown (1927) by The Rats And People Motion Picture Orchestra

The Tod Browning Tribute at The St. Louis International Film Festival was an epic evening of vintage silent cinema and live music. (Details about the event can be found Here) http://www.wearemoviegeeks.com/2015/11/sliff-2015-tribute-to-tod-browning-this-friday-the-unknown-and-freaks/

The Rats and People Motion Picture Orchestra accompanied director Tod Browning’s 1927 silent film The Unknown which starred Lon Chaney and Joan Crawford. The St. Louis-based musicians did a terrific job with their original score and if you missed the event, we have good news. The Rats and People Motion Picture Orchestra have posted the performance online. If you go Here https://soundcloud.com/rats-1/the-unknown , you will find the recording of the score. Get out your The Unknown DVD (available on the TCM Archives – The Lon Chaney Collection) or, if you don’t have the DVD, you can find the complete film online Here http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x2aq5g1_the-unknown-
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Sliff 2015: Tribute to Tod Browning This Friday – The Unknown and Freaks

“Gooble-gobble, gooble-gobble, we accept her, we accept her, one of us, one of us.”

Cinema St. Louis presents a Tribute to Tod Browning Friday November 13th at Webster University’s Moore Auditorium as part of this year’s St. Louis International Film Festival. The program includes a 35mm screening of Browning’s 1927 silent shocker The Unknown with live music by The Rats and People Motion Picture Orchestra followed by a screening of Browning’s 1932 masterpiece Freaks. The event begins at 7:30pm and will be hosted by We Are Movie Geeks own Tom Stockman. Ticket information can be found Here

Tod Browning (1880-1962) was a pioneering director who helped establish the horror film genre. Born in Louisville Kentucky, Browning ran away to join the circus at an early age which influenced his later career in Hollywood and echoes of those years can be found in many of his films. Though
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

A Fiend’s Guide to the 2015 St. Louis International Film Festival

The 2015 St. Louis International Film Festival, also known as Sliff, has begun. Even though Alex Winter couldn’t bring Freaked in town, he did bring his two great tech documentaries, Downloaded and Deep Web – in addition to being awesome to us and presenting Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure. Sliff has a robust schedule full of independent and foreign cinema along with some mainstream affair like Legend starring Tom Hardy and some possible future Oscar contenders like Carol. However, since we are a horror website, we are going to highlight some films that should definitely be on your radar!

Feature Films

The Nameless

Filmed in “The Exorcist House” here in St. Louis, which most of you might have seen last weekend during Discovery Channel’s laughable Exorcism: Live!, this thriller borrows from the premise that The Exorcist was based out of by having a main character, Amy, return to the house
See full article at Destroy the Brain »

Sliff 2015 Interview: Alex Winter – Actor and Director of Deep Web

Director Alex Winter’s Deep Web screens at The St. Louis International Film Festival Thursday, November 5th at 7:30. Winter will be in attendance and will receive a Lifetime Achievement Award. Ticket information for that event can be found Here. Alex Winter will also attend a screening of Bill And Ted’S Excellent Adventure, the 1989 comedy which he co-starred in along with Keanu Reeves and George Carlin at The Tivoli Theater Friday, November 6th at 9:30. Ticket information for that event can be found Here. Finally, Winter will attend a screening of his 2013 documentary Downloaded Saturday November 7th at 4:30 pm at The Tivoli Theater. Ticket information for that event can be found Here.

Winter is coming to St. Louis! The St. Louis International Film Festival honors former St. Louisan Alex Winter, whose varied career includes acting on stage and in film, and directing both narratives and documentaries. Winter’s new film Deep Web,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

200 Greatest Horror Films (40-31)

  • SoundOnSight
Special Mention: The Most Dangerous Game

Directed by Irving Pichel and Ernest B. Schoedsack

Written by James Creelman

USA, 1932

Genre: Survival Horror

The first of many official and unofficial screen versions of Richard Connell’s short story of the same name, The Most Dangerous Game was made in 1932, in the era known as “Pre-Code Hollywood,” a time when filmmakers were able to get away with sexual innuendo, illegal drug use, adultery, abortion, intense violence, homosexuality, and much more. It was during this time that a film like The Most Dangerous Game was allowed to be made and shown to the general public without fear of censorship. The film was put together by producer Willis O’Brien while in pre-production on King Kong, and features several of the same cast and crew members, as well as props and sets from Kong. Despite these obvious cost-cutting measures, Dangerous Game never feels like a second-rate production,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

NYC Weekend Watch: David Cronenberg, Classic 3-D, Mathieu Amalric & More

Since any New York City cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Museum of the Moving Image

Maurice Pialat‘s six-hour miniseries, Le maison de bois, will conclude the career-spanning retrospective.

“It Came from Within: A David Cronenberg Horror Weekend” brings the director’s classics to the big screen.

Film Forum

“Classic 3-D” offers three dimensions of repertory viewing, with titles such as Dial M for Murder and House of Wax.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Tribute To Tod Browning at Sliff November 13th – The Unknown and Freaks

“Gooble-gobble, gooble-gobble, we accept her, we accept her, one of us, one of us.”

Cinema St. Louis presents a Tribute to Tod Browning Friday November 13th at Webster University’s Moore Auditorium as part of this year’s St. Louis International Film Festival. The program includes a 35mm screening of Browning’s 1927 silent shocker The Unknown with live music by The Rats and People Motion Picture Orchestra followed by a screening of Browning’s 1932 masterpiece Freaks. The event begins at 7pm and will be hosted by We Are Movie Geeks own Tom Stockman

Tod Browning (1880-1962) was a pioneering director who helped establish the horror film genre. Born in Louisville Kentucky, Browning ran away to join the circus at an early age which influenced his later career in Hollywood and echoes of those years can be found in many of his films. Though best known as the director of the
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

MGM's Lioness, the Epitome of Hollywood Superstardom, Has Her Day on TCM

Joan Crawford Movie Star Joan Crawford movies on TCM: Underrated actress, top star in several of her greatest roles If there was ever a professional who was utterly, completely, wholeheartedly dedicated to her work, Joan Crawford was it. Ambitious, driven, talented, smart, obsessive, calculating, she had whatever it took – and more – to reach the top and stay there. Nearly four decades after her death, Crawford, the star to end all stars, remains one of the iconic performers of the 20th century. Deservedly so, once you choose to bypass the Mommie Dearest inanity and focus on her film work. From the get-go, she was a capable actress; look for the hard-to-find silents The Understanding Heart (1927) and The Taxi Dancer (1927), and check her out in the more easily accessible The Unknown (1927) and Our Dancing Daughters (1928). By the early '30s, Joan Crawford had become a first-rate film actress, far more naturalistic than
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

From the ‘King of the Movies’ to Bit Player – the Final Years of King Baggot

The King Baggot Tribute will take place Friday, November 14th at Webster University’s Moore Auditorium beginning at 7pm as part of this year’s St. Louis Intenational FIlm Festival. The program will consist a rare 35mm screening of the 1913 epic Ivanhoe starring King Baggot with live music accompaniment by the Rats and People Motion Picture Orchestra. Ivanhoe will be followed by an illustrated lecture on the life and films of King Baggot presented by Tom Stockman, editor here at We Are Movie Geeks. After that will screen the influential silent western Tumbleweeds (1925), considered to be one of King Baggot’s finest achievements as a director. Tumbleweeds will feature live piano accompaniment by Matt Pace.

Here’s a look at the final phase of King Baggot’s career.

King Baggot, the first ‘King of the Movies’ died July 11th, 1948 penniless and mostly forgotten at age 68. A St. Louis native, Baggot
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

The Chicago Critics' Top 100 Horror (or Just Plain Creepy) Films in History

Scariest movies ever made: The top 100 horror films according to the Chicago Film Critics (photo: Janet Leigh, John Gavin and Vera Miles in Alfred Hitchcock's 'Psycho') I tend to ignore lists featuring the Top 100 Movies (or Top 10 Movies or Top 20 Movies, etc.), no matter the category or criteria, because these lists are almost invariably compiled by people who know little about films beyond mainstream Hollywood stuff released in the last decade or two. But the Chicago Film Critics Association's list of the 100 Scariest Movies Ever Made, which came out in October 2006, does include several oldies — e.g., James Whale's Frankenstein and The Bride of Frankenstein — in addition to, gasp, a handful of non-American horror films such as Dario Argento's Suspiria, Werner Herzog's Nosferatu the Vampyre, and F.W. Murnau's brilliant Dracula rip-off Nosferatu. (Check out the full list of the Chicago Film Critics' top 100 horror movies of all time.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Movies This Week: September 12-18, 2014

  • Slackerwood
 

The Alamo Drafthouse Ritz is turning the spotlight on some of their favorite films of the year this week by bringing in The Dance Of Reality, The Grand Budapest Hotel (Don's review), Obvious Child (Elizabeth's review), The Raid 2 and We Are The Best! (my review) for select showtimes. Each screening is just $5 and these films are all worth checking out on the big screen if you missed them or just want to see them again.

Also at the Ritz this week: Broadway Brunch returns with The Music Man in 35mm on Saturday and Sunday afternoons, Howard The Duck screens on Sunday with a live Q&A featuring Val Mayerik (a co-creator of the original comic), the original 1987 Robocop on Sunday for Tough Guy Cinema, a rare 35mm screening of The Assassination of Jesse James By The Coward Robert Ford on Tuesday and A Nightmare On Elm Street 4: The Dream Master
See full article at Slackerwood »

Magnetic Fields Frontman Stephin Merritt Will Return to Sf International Film Fest

The San Francisco International Film Festival, now in its 57th year, will pull several silent treasures out of the vault to accompany live performances by indie pop band Magnetic Fields frontman Stephin Merritt, and by Thao Nguyen of Thao & The Get Down Stay Down.On Tuesday, May 6, Merritt will present a new original score to "Freaks" director Tod Browning's mind-bending, circus-set crime classic "The Unknown" (clip below). A match made in heaven for Merritt who, back in 2010, performed a wonderful live score to "20,000 Leagues Under the Sea." A week earlier, on Tuesday, April 29, Thao Nguyen and her band will perform alongside a selection of silent shorts, with a presentation of her own short films. Both musical events will go down at Sf's beloved Castro Theatre.This year's edition of Sfiff runs April 24 to May 8. We'll be there covering films and festivities. It was previously announced that Richard Linklater will
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Slapstick Festival, CarnyVille: this week's new film events

Slapstick Festival | The Loco London Comedy Film Festival | Rybczynski: Exploring Space | CarnyVille

Slapstick Festival, Bristol

With Buster Keaton back in cinemas (The General is on reissue and there's a retrospective at London's BFI), it's a good time to brush up on silent comedy, and this festival, celebrating its 10th anniversary, has done much to spread the word, or maybe the subtitle. This year Charlie Chaplin takes his turn in the spotlight and marks the 100th anniversary of his Little Tramp incarnation, with Omid Djalili introducing an orchestra-backed screening of City Lights at Colston Hall on Friday. The seen-it-all crowd will be more intrigued by celebrations of forgotten stars such as Constance Talmadge, Raymond Griffith and Max Davidson. More up to date, Tim Vine explains why he loves Benny Hill (Watershed, 26 Jan), and Phill Jupitus asks Paul McGann and Ralph Brown about the making of Withnail & I (Bristol Old Vic, 26 Jan).

Various venues,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

UK Event Report and Image Gallery: 2013 Mayhem Horror Film Festival

Last month we took a trip to Nottingham, England's cinephile haven Broadway Cinema for four days of eclectic genre programming at the 2013 Mayhem Horror Film Festival. Check in right here for a look at some of the sights and reviews from the East Midlands' premier horror fest.

The festival kicked off on Thursday 31st October with a special screening of director Nicholas Roeg's Don't Look Now and Puffball, taking place in the special environs of St. Mary's Church with Roeg himself in attendance to introduce and officially open this year's event.

Topping off the evening was Vincenzo Natali's underwhelming Haunter (review here).

While we weren't around for that particular evening's events, the following three days saw a schedule packed to the gills with guests, impromptu trivia-based giveaways, and screenings unfolding before and behind the Broadway's gorgeous red curtains, including:

- The cinematically sumptuous, but disappointingly perplexing The Strange
See full article at Dread Central »

Mayhem Film Festival announces full 2013 line-up

Mayhem Film Festival returns to Broadway on 31st October for four days of horror-tinged screenings, previews and guests. The festival opens this year with internationally-acclaimed British director Nicolas Roeg who will be presenting his most recent film Puffball as well as taking part in a very special screening of his masterpiece Don’t Look Now in the eerie settings of St Mary’s Church in the Lace Market.

Other special guests for the festival include American Director Brian Netto who will be presenting Delivery, The Borderlands Director Elliot Goldner and Producer Jennifer Handorf, and director Caradog James and Producer John Giwa-Amu for hi-tech British dark sci-fi The Machine. Mayhem are also hosting a special BAFTA screening of Jeremy Lovering’s In Fear which follows a young couple being tormented while driving in the countryside.

With a total of 17 screenings, Mayhem will present their first silent film screening, Tod Browning’s
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Two Non-Horror Films That Scared the Hell Out of Us!!

While there are more than enough horror and genre films that do the trick of scaring the living crap out of us, sometimes films outside of that box do it just as effectively. A couple of us Icons of Fright staffers decided to share with you fright fiends, some movies that aren’t horror films, but are quite intense all the same. Read on!

There Will Be Blood (2007)

There’s something about Pt Anderson’s very loose adaption of Upton Sinclair’s Oil! that freaks me the hell out. Does it have a masked killer walking around, slaughtering nubile teens?, nope. It is also without about 90% of other elements that typically give me an upset feeling after watching it. Instead it relies on a combination of one of the best performances of all time (yeah, I said that) and a Very unsettling score masterfully done by Radiohead’s Jonny Greenwood,
See full article at Icons of Fright »

The Ethics of Tod Browning’s Freaks (1932)

Produced by MGM in 1932, Freaks (dir. Tod Browning) was withdrawn upon its initial theatrical release and is one of the few films from the era that remains truly shocking to contemporary audiences. The film features real circus “freaks” and their apparent monstrosity was one of the driving forces of the numerous controversies that plagued the film. Their representation remains a point of contention for the contemporary viewer, and whether or not the film does more harm than good in regards to its subject remains an open question for the socially conscious. The film encounters many of the same legal and ethical issues that freak shows have, offering a cinematic equal to the roadside attractions and circus shows.

Tod Browning’s career had been no stranger to the physically disabled and many of his silent films, including The Unknown (1927) and The Unholy Three (1925) featured prominent characters with physical disabilities. Before coming to Hollywood,
See full article at SoundOnSight »
loading
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Showtimes | External Sites