Viceroy’s House movie review: are we condemned to repeat this?

MaryAnn’s quick take… Snappy, snappish historical drama about the partition of India rings with sly humor, dry cynicism, and a smack of relevance for today’s divisive politics. I’m “biast” (pro): nothing

I’m “biast” (con): nothing

(what is this about? see my critic’s minifesto)

In 1947, Lord Louis “Dickie” Mountbatten, cousin to King George VI, was sent to India as its last viceroy, to rule in George’s stead — he was Emperor of India, of course — and to facilitate that nation’s transition to independence. And as depicted in Viceroy’s House, Gurinder Chadha’s snappy and later snappish drama about the handover, Mountbatten is initially a rather cheery midwife to the end of the British Empire. Hugh Bonneville (Paddington, The Monuments Men) brings a certain bonhomie to a man described as someone who “could charm a vulture off a corpse,” and Dickie and his wife,
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