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The Power and Timeliness of Kathryn Bigelow and Mark Boal’s ‘Detroit’

The following content has been sponsored by Annapurna Pictures. “Detroit,” the latest triumph from the award-winning team of director Kathryn Bigelow and writer Mark Boal, is a story about both 1967 and 2017. Aided by a skilled ensemble cast, the film dramatizes with vivid and visceral precision the horrors of a particular summer night in Detroit, Michigan, striking at the heart of injustices still urgently relevant to the U.S. today. As they did with “The Hurt Locker” and “Zero Dark Thirty,” Bigelow and Boal bring their cinematically intense focus to recent American history, creating a moviegoing experience resembling both drama and documentary. Nominated for four NAACP Awards including Best Film, “Detroit” features a fiercely committed cast of standout performers: John Boyega, Will Poulter, Algee Smith, Anthony Mackie, Jacob Latimore, Hannah Murray, John Krasinski, and more. The cast has been honored with the Actors Fund Community Service Award, recognizing their cohesive ensemble
See full article at Backstage »

Kathryn Bigelow Salutes Her Below-the-Line Colleagues on ‘Detroit’

Kathryn Bigelow Salutes Her Below-the-Line Colleagues on ‘Detroit’
Annapurna’s “Detroit” is being re-released in theaters today, Dec. 1, and awards screeners were recently sent out. The film was written by Mark Boal and directed by Kathryn Bigelow, their third collaboration after “Hurt Locker” (in which both won Oscars, with the film named best picture) and “Zero Dark Thirty.” In an email to Variety, Bigelow cited the work of her below-the-line colleagues on “Detroit,” set during the 1967 uprising.

Production designer Jeremy Hindle

Jeremy Hindle is a master craftsman. Sifting through hundreds of photographs from the time period, Jeremy can identify the handful of frames necessary to create an entire three-dimensional universe in which the story may live, and out of a single image he creates a color palette which will influence and guide all aspects of the film, from photography to sets to wardrobe. Jeremy not only provides a visual landscape, but he burrows far beneath the surface, meeting with people from the period, discovering the narrative
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Past Is Prologue in Awards Contenders Based on Historical Moments

Past Is Prologue in Awards Contenders Based on Historical Moments
This year’s awards contenders are hoping to take home prizes in 2018, but many are firmly affixed in the past. Stories this year are being told about Amazon jungle explorers (“The Lost City of Z”), World War II in Europe (“Darkest Hour” and “Dunkirk”), a 1967 inner-city riot (“Detroit”), Queen Victoria’s friendship with a citizen of one of her colonies (“Victoria & Abdul”) and post-wwii veterans in America’s deep South (“Mudbound”).

That’s hardly unusual; movies frequently plumb the past for its rich store of stories, told and untold, particularly during awards season. And each of these films have found tales to spin from history that are both familiar and fresh. But none of these films — in fact, few period films, aside from documentaries — are merely the sum of their parts. Whether audiences are aware of it or not, filmmakers are not simply tugging narrative threads from history’s tapestry: there’s a much more subtle art at
See full article at Variety - Film News »

The Academy Governors Awards: Angelina Jolie and Agnes Varda Danced as Hollywood Celebrated Oscars

The Academy Governors Awards: Angelina Jolie and Agnes Varda Danced as Hollywood Celebrated Oscars
“Shitty is shitty,” new Academy governor Whoopi Goldberg told me of the vote to expel a member for the second time in AMPAS’ 90-year history. As everyone in Hollywood struggles to keep their head straight amid a flood of sexual harassment scandals, this year’s crop of Oscar contenders braved Hollywood and Highland traffic snarls to charm a room full of Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) members, including the 54 Governors who voted for this year’s five Honorary Oscars, presented at the 9th (untelevised) Governors Awards.

Behind the scenes, Oscar campaigners had pushed their clients as presenters. Clearly, it was a no-brainer to put Jennifer Lawrence (“mother!”) on stage to present to her “Hunger Games” costar Donald Sutherland (“M.A.S.H.,” “Klute,” “Don’t Look Now”), who never scored one Oscar nomination. “It’s odd that he never won an Oscar,” said Lawrence, thanking him for his generosity and
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

The Academy Governors Awards: Angelina Jolie and Agnes Varda Danced as Hollywood Celebrated Oscars

  • Indiewire
The Academy Governors Awards: Angelina Jolie and Agnes Varda Danced as Hollywood Celebrated Oscars
“Shitty is shitty,” new Academy governor Whoopi Goldberg told me of the vote to expel a member for the second time in AMPAS’ 90-year history. As everyone in Hollywood struggles to keep their head straight amid a flood of sexual harassment scandals, this year’s crop of Oscar contenders braved Hollywood and Highland traffic snarls to charm a room full of Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) members, including the 54 Governors who voted for this year’s five Honorary Oscars, presented at the 9th (untelevised) Governors Awards.

Behind the scenes, Oscar campaigners had pushed their clients as presenters. Clearly, it was a no-brainer to put Jennifer Lawrence (“mother!”) on stage to present to her “Hunger Games” costar Donald Sutherland (“M.A.S.H.,” “Klute,” “Don’t Look Now”), who never scored one Oscar nomination. “It’s odd that he never won an Oscar,” said Lawrence, thanking him for his generosity and
See full article at Indiewire »

Why This Could Be the Year That Best-Director Oscar Nominations Finally Tip Toward Women

Why This Could Be the Year That Best-Director Oscar Nominations Finally Tip Toward Women
Kevin Spacey’s Oscar chances, obliterated. Dustin Hoffman’s, gone. While we don’t yet have the hashtag, March 4, 2018 will be remembered as the year that the issue of sexual harassment took center stage at the Dolby Theatre.

If one of the historical perks of Hollywood stardom was the ability to misbehave without consequences, those days are over. Sony pulled Ridley Scott’s AFI Fest closer “All the Money in the World,” which was primed for an awards campaign around Spacey, now accused of multiple instances of sexual harassment and abuse.

While Hoffman presented a Hollywood Film Award Sunday night, it’s unlikely that his crusty New York patriarch will be in the running for “The Meyerowitz Stories (New and Selected)” after multiple harassment claims — in addition to Meryl Streep’s own account of how he introduced himself by grabbing her breast. (Streep will move into Oscar mode as
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Why This Could Be the Year That Best-Director Oscar Nominations Finally Tip Toward Women

  • Indiewire
Why This Could Be the Year That Best-Director Oscar Nominations Finally Tip Toward Women
Kevin Spacey’s Oscar chances, obliterated. Dustin Hoffman’s, gone. While we don’t yet have the hashtag, March 4, 2018 will be remembered as the year that the issue of sexual harassment took center stage at the Dolby Theatre.

If one of the historical perks of Hollywood stardom was the ability to misbehave without consequences, those days are over. Sony pulled Ridley Scott’s AFI Fest closer “All the Money in the World,” which was primed for an awards campaign around Spacey, now accused of multiple instances of sexual harassment and abuse.

While Hoffman accepted a Hollywood Film Award Sunday night, it’s unlikely that his crusty New York patriarch will be in the running for “The Meyerowitz Stories (New and Selected)” after multiple harassment claims — in addition to Meryl Streep’s own account of how he introduced himself by grabbing her breast. (Streep will move into Oscar mode as
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Detroit’s Will Poulter On His Visceral Response To Historical Drama – The Contenders London Video

‘Detroit’s Will Poulter On His Visceral Response To Historical Drama – The Contenders London Video
“It was kind of frightening to come across the script in 2017 and have it bear such a strong and unfortunate resemblance to the events that we've seen all too recently, as far as police brutality is concerned, and innocent people of color dying at the hands of law enforcement,” Will Poulter said at Deadline’s The Contenders London event of Detroit, the latest minutely observed historical drama from Oscar winners Kathryn Bigelow and Mark Boal. Set during the 1967 Detroit
See full article at Deadline »

Annapurna Moves Toward Bond 25 With New MGM Distribution Deal

Annapurna Moves Toward Bond 25 With New MGM Distribution Deal
When Annapurna Pictures moved into distribution, Hollywood viewed the move as bold but bizarre. In a market where indies struggle to survive, it was a strange time to reinvent a dying economic model. Now after several costly, high-profile failures, Annapurna and MGM will work together to distribute their films theatrically in the U.S.

Annapurna hired veteran talent — from ex-Weinstein distribution president Erik Lomis and studio marketing exec Marc Weinstock to Focus Features’ publicity chief Adrienne Bowles — but they inexplicably chose “Detroit” as its first release. From director Kathryn Bigelow and writer Mark Boal, the Oscar-winning team behind “The Hurt Locker” and Annapurna’s “Zero Dark Thirty,” this intense recreation of the 1967 race riot in Detroit is a tough sit and demanded special handling from the neophyte distributor.

The movie (Metascore: 78) opened well in 20 theaters in late July, but collapsed when it went wide to 2,800 screens the following weekend. (It topped out at $16.8 million domestic.
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Annapurna Moves Toward Bond 25 With New MGM Distribution Deal

Annapurna Moves Toward Bond 25 With New MGM Distribution Deal
When Annapurna Pictures moved into distribution, Hollywood viewed the move as bold but bizarre. In a market where indies struggle to survive, it was a strange time to reinvent a dying economic model. Now after several costly, high-profile failures, Annapurna and MGM will work together to distribute their films theatrically in the U.S.

Annapurna hired veteran talent — from ex-Weinstein distribution president Erik Lomis and studio marketing exec Marc Weinstock to Focus Features’ publicity chief Adrienne Bowles — but they inexplicably chose “Detroit” as its first release. From director Kathryn Bigelow and writer Mark Boal, the Oscar-winning team behind “The Hurt Locker” and Annapurna’s “Zero Dark Thirty,” this intense recreation of the 1967 race riot in Detroit is a tough sit and demanded special handling from the neophyte distributor.

The movie (Metascore: 78) opened well in 20 theaters in late July, but collapsed when it went wide to 2,800 screens the following weekend. (It topped out at $16.8 million domestic.
See full article at Indiewire »

Oscars Not So White: ‘Get Out’ and ‘Mudbound’ Lead Diverse 2018 Contenders

It would be lovely to think that last year’s “Moonlight” Oscar wins presaged a long and permanent shift in Hollywood movie culture. At the heart of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences’ complex diversity issue is how much the Oscars reflect the way that the Academy likes to view itself. That helps to explain why the Academy voters did far better with their 2017 Oscar nominations than the year before, when their 6,000 members failed to nominate any actors of color at all.

Read More:Barry Jenkins and Jordan Peele Among the 774 Invited to Join the Academy As It Pushes for Inclusion

The Academy’s recent diversity push added more younger and international members; its 7,000 voters are now 28 percent women and 13 percent people of color. But will the new membership shifts make a major impact on the 2018 Oscar nominations? Despite the new voters, the organization is still under the
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Oscars Not So White: ‘Get Out’ and ‘Mudbound’ Lead Diverse 2018 Contenders

It would be lovely to think that last year’s “Moonlight” Oscar wins presaged a long and permanent shift in Hollywood movie culture. At the heart of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences’ complex diversity issue is how much the Oscars reflect the way that the Academy likes to view itself. That helps to explain why the Academy voters did far better with their 2017 Oscar nominations than the year before, when their 6,000 members failed to nominate any actors of color at all.

Read More:Barry Jenkins and Jordan Peele Among the 774 Invited to Join the Academy As It Pushes for Inclusion

The Academy’s recent diversity push added more younger and international members; its 7,000 voters are now 28 percent women and 13 percent people of color. But will the new membership shifts make a major impact on the 2018 Oscar nominations? Despite the new voters, the organization is still under the
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Detroit’ Star Will Poulter On Police Brutality & “The Blue Code Of Silence” – The Contenders London

‘Detroit’ Star Will Poulter On Police Brutality & “The Blue Code Of Silence” – The Contenders London
Will Poulter arrived at Deadline's inaugural The Contenders London event to assure the audience at BAFTA that the charming, easy-going star of We're The Millers had not crossed over to the dark side after his all-too-convincing performance as racist cop Krauss in Kathryn Bigelow's riot-set period drama Detroit. Written by Bigelow's regular collaborator Mark Boal, who scripted Bigelow's 2008 Oscar-winner The Hurt Locker as well as the 2012 follow-up Zero Dark Thirty, the…
See full article at Deadline »

Who Gets to Tell Whose Story?: Ifp Week Filmmakers and Funders Talk the Politics of Representation in 2017

When Kathryn Bigelow’s Detroit came out this summer, some charged that it shouldn’t have been made by Kathryn Bigelow. Critics, including rogerebert.com’s Angelica Jade Bastien, felt that the story — about ten Black civilians (and two Caucasians) tortured and, in some cases, killed by racist white cops during the 1967 Detroit riots — should have been told by Black filmmakers. These commentators argued that Bigelow and her screenwriter Mark Boal, both white, not only lacked the perspective to get the events right; they also ran the risk of aestheticizing suffering and the destruction of Black bodies. This is not a new […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

Kathryn Bigelow and cinematic journalism

Henry Bevan on Kathryn Bigelow and cinematic journalism…

Hollywood is obsessed with journalists. From Howard Hawks pictures to most superhero films and romcoms, journalists are often window dressing for plot and snarky dialogue. Journalists themselves are represented as sheriffs or scoundrels, often overly moralistic or morally bankrupt.

For an industry in love with newsroom culture, Hollywood rarely does actual journalism. Unlike the publishing world, Hollywood hasn’t embraced how it can use its various tools to comment on the world. That is until Kathryn Bigelow.

While Bigelow hasn’t made a journalism movie, she has moved away from fun genre pieces like Point Break. Since The Hurt Locker, her three films have been written by journalist-turned-screenwriter Mark Boal, and they are what she calls ‘cinematic journalism’, an oxymoronic term responsible for the controversy that met both Zero Dark Thirty and her latest, Detroit.

By looking at Bigelow’s recent work,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

How Two Filmmakers Confronted Their Biggest Fear With a Documentary

  • Indiewire
How Two Filmmakers Confronted Their Biggest Fear With a Documentary
The tension was unbearable. Israel was in the midst of the “individual’s intifada,” a new kind of uprising that replaced the more familiar dangers with seemingly random stabbings and vehicle attacks. Suddenly, every person on the street was a potential threat, every car a potential weapon. Mundane activities—walking the kids to school, taking the bus to work—now seemed perilous. People wanted the government to protect them, and the government appeared helpless. Israel’s security minister advised citizens who owned a gun to carry it with them. Old ladies carried kitchen knives and rolling pins in their bags.

And each day the headline news provided a drumbeat to the growing collective fear: three stabbings in one day, or maybe a shooting just down the street, in a place you thought was safe.

That fall, we got a call from Guy Lavie, the commissioning editor of yesDocu, Israel’s documentary channel.
See full article at Indiewire »

Film News Roundup: ‘Downton Abbey’ Star Allen Leech Joins ‘Bohemian Rhapsody’

Film News Roundup: ‘Downton Abbey’ Star Allen Leech Joins ‘Bohemian Rhapsody’
In today’s film news roundup, “Bohemian Rhapsody” rounds out its cast with “Downtown Abbey” actor Allen Leech, Kenny Leu and Ciara Renee will star in a police drama, and the AFI Latin American Film Festival rolls out its lineup.

Castings

Fox has rounded out the cast of the Queen biopic “Bohemian Rhapsody” with Allen Leech cast as Freddie Mercury’s personal manager, Paul Prenter.

Rami Malek is starring as the frontman, with Ben Hardy, Gwilym Lee, and Joe Mazzello as members of Queen. Production on the film will begin this fall, with Bryan Singer directing from Justin Haythe’s script. New Regency and Graham King’s Gk Films are the production companies.

Prenter was fired by Mercury for disclosing inside information about the singer after working with him for nine years, from 1977 to 1986.

Leech’s credits include “Bellevue” opposite Anna Paquin, “Downton Abbey,” and “The Imitation Game” opposite Benedict Cumberbatch. He
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Detroit movie review: racism 101 for white people

MaryAnn’s quick take… Tense, gripping, enraging, but only about things that black Americans already know. This is a primer about racism for white people, and we must pay attention. I’m “biast” (pro): nothing

I’m “biast” (con): nothing

(what is this about? see my critic’s minifesto)

Detroit is a movie about racism in America for white people. It mostly does not center black characters except as victims. Its villain — a murderously racist white cop — is also its protagonist. A movie about racism in America for white people isn’t the most terrible idea ever: Detroit wants to show us white people how the systematic weight of endless injustice weighs on black people, psychologically as well as physically, because of entrenched racism, not only of the actively vicious kind but also of the “I’m not getting involved, I’m just minding my own business” kind.
See full article at FlickFilosopher »
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