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‘Twin Peaks’ Finale Review: David Lynch Steps Outside of the Dream for a Brilliant, Mindbending Final Journey

‘Twin Peaks’ Finale Review: David Lynch Steps Outside of the Dream for a Brilliant, Mindbending Final Journey
[Editor’s Note: The following review contains spoilers for “Twin Peaks: The Return” Episode 17 and 18, “Part 17” and “Part 18.”]

“We live inside a dream. I hope I see all of you again. Everyone of you.” Agent Dale Cooper’s (Kyle MacLachlan) says these words in a moment of triumph during the penultimate episode of the season. But fans are probably echoing them after watching the finale in which David Lynch and Mark Frost’s surreal experiment in TV ended on yet another cliffhanger with no guarantee of traditional closure. It’s a brilliant and no doubt controversial ending for a show that had come back after 25 years to leave fans wanting yet again.

The two-part final journey began with promise: continuing the happy trajectory that had been set out by the past few episodes by confirming theories and providing satisfying cappers to arcs. Yes, Naido is Diane! Freddie’s green fist vanquishes Bob! Dougie 2.0 rejoins the Joneses! But even as all of this joy has been unfolding, knowing Lynch’s track record,
See full article at Indiewire Television »

‘Twin Peaks’ Finale Review: David Lynch Steps Outside of the Dream for a Brilliant, Mindbending Final Journey

‘Twin Peaks’ Finale Review: David Lynch Steps Outside of the Dream for a Brilliant, Mindbending Final Journey
[Editor’s Note: The following review contains spoilers for “Twin Peaks: The Return” Episode 17 and 18, “Part 17” and “Part 18.”]

“We live inside a dream. I hope I see all of you again. Everyone of you.” Agent Dale Cooper’s (Kyle MacLachlan) says these words in a moment of triumph during the penultimate episode of the season. But fans are probably echoing them after watching the finale in which David Lynch and Mark Frost’s surreal experiment in TV ended on yet another cliffhanger with no guarantee of traditional closure. It’s a brilliant and no doubt controversial ending for a show that had come back after 25 years to leave fans wanting yet again.

The two-part final journey began with promise: continuing the happy trajectory that had been set out by the past few episodes by confirming theories and providing satisfying cappers to arcs. Yes, Naido is Diane! Freddie’s green fist vanquishes Bob! Dougie 2.0 rejoins the Joneses! But even as all of this joy has been unfolding, knowing Lynch’s track record,
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Twin Peaks’ Finale: 16 Burning Questions Before ‘The Return’ Wraps For Good

‘Twin Peaks’ Finale: 16 Burning Questions Before ‘The Return’ Wraps For Good
[Editor’s Note: The following article contains spoilers for “Twin Peaks: The Return” up until the finale.]

With only two hours left in “Twin Peaks,” there are still a lot of questions to be answered. Of course, anyone who’s seen all 16 hours of “The Return” knows it’s a fool’s errand to expect explicit clarification on everything. Some events are random. Some illustrate a tonal shift. Some are purposefully ambiguous.

But there are a few pertinent tidbits which could benefit from further exploration. Below, IndieWire has collected a batch of questions we wouldn’t mind having David Lynch and Mark Frost address — via their expressionist ideals — in what everyone expects to be a damn good finale.

Read More:‘Twin Peaks’ is Flying Into Its Finale: Why All That Action Could Lead to a Definitive Ending Why is Laura “the one”?

In one message for Hawk (Michael Horse), the Log Lady (Catherine Coulson) said, “Watch and listen to the dream of time and space. It all comes out now,
See full article at Indiewire Television »

‘Twin Peaks’ Finale: 16 Burning Questions Before ‘The Return’ Wraps For Good

  • Indiewire
‘Twin Peaks’ Finale: 16 Burning Questions Before ‘The Return’ Wraps For Good
[Editor’s Note: The following article contains spoilers for “Twin Peaks: The Return” up until the finale.]

With only two hours left in “Twin Peaks,” there are still a lot of questions to be answered. Of course, anyone who’s seen all 16 hours of “The Return” knows it’s a fool’s errand to expect explicit clarification on everything. Some events are random. Some illustrate a tonal shift. Some are purposefully ambiguous.

But there are a few pertinent tidbits which could benefit from further exploration. Below, IndieWire has collected a batch of questions we wouldn’t mind having David Lynch and Mark Frost address — via their expressionist ideals — in what everyone expects to be a damn good finale.

Read More:‘Twin Peaks’ is Flying Into Its Finale: Why All That Action Could Lead to a Definitive Ending Why is Laura “the one”?

In one message for Hawk (Michael Horse), the Log Lady (Catherine Coulson) said, “Watch and listen to the dream of time and space. It all comes out now,
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Twin Peaks’: Breaking Down Cooper’s Possible Fates and How He’ll Return to Twin Peaks

‘Twin Peaks’: Breaking Down Cooper’s Possible Fates and How He’ll Return to Twin Peaks
As “Twin Peaks” starts nearing its end, David Lynch has been kind enough to start giving the series a little bit of closure when it comes to the familiar characters in the town. The central mystery, however, is more baffling than ever, and the most recent question on everyone’s mind is the fate of Special Agent Cooper (Kyle MacLachlan).

In the last episode, Cooper is living his best Dougie life by digging into some chocolate cake when he catches on TV the portion of “Sunset Boulevard” that mentions Gordon Cole, which happens to be the same name as his old FBI Director pal, played by Lynch. Recognition spurs Cooper into action, and he sticks a fork into the electrical socket. Cut to outside of the house as the sounds of Dougie’s wife Janey-e (Naomi Watts) screaming within can be heard.

Read More:‘Twin Peaks’ Just Explained How Dougie
See full article at Indiewire Television »

‘Twin Peaks’: Breaking Down Cooper’s Possible Fates and How He’ll Return to Twin Peaks

‘Twin Peaks’: Breaking Down Cooper’s Possible Fates and How He’ll Return to Twin Peaks
As “Twin Peaks” starts nearing its end, David Lynch has been kind enough to start giving the series a little bit of closure when it comes to the familiar characters in the town. The central mystery, however, is more baffling than ever, and the most recent question on everyone’s mind is the fate of Special Agent Cooper (Kyle MacLachlan).

In the last episode, Cooper is living his best Dougie life by digging into some chocolate cake when he catches on TV the portion of “Sunset Boulevard” that mentions Gordon Cole, which happens to be the same name as his old FBI Director pal, played by Lynch. Recognition spurs Cooper into action, and he sticks a fork into the electrical socket. Cut to outside of the house as the sounds of Dougie’s wife Janey-e (Naomi Watts) screaming within can be heard.

Read More:‘Twin Peaks’ Just Explained How Dougie
See full article at Indiewire »

"Twin Peaks," Episode 15 Recap: How Beautiful Is This

  • MUBI
Twin Peaks Recap is a weekly column by Keith Uhlich covering David Lynch and Mark Frost's limited, 18-episode continuation of the Twin Peaks television series.The best things come to those who wait, and Big Ed Hurley (Everett McGill) has long been dreaming of the moment that opens Part 15 of Mark Frost and David Lynch's Twin Peaks revival. "I've been a selfish bitch to you all these years," says his one-eyed wife Nadine (Wendy Robie), who's walked a long way—a Dr. Jacoby/Dr. Amp gold, shit-digging shovel slung over her shoulder—to the cash-only Gas Farm that Ed has run for most of his life. She states the obvious: Ed is in love with Rr Diner propietor Norma Jennings (Peggy Lipton), and she, Nadine, has always stood in his way. Those days are finally over. Ed is reluctant to think of this as anything beyond another of his spouse's manic episodes.
See full article at MUBI »

‘Twin Peaks’ Just Explained How Dougie Came Into This World

‘Twin Peaks’ Just Explained How Dougie Came Into This World
[Editor’s Note: The following review contains spoilers for “Twin Peaks: The Return” Episode 14, “Part 14.”]

Twin Peaks” dropped a major hint on Sunday about the origins of Dougie, the man whom Evil Cooper/Mr. C created as a decoy, and whose life Agent Dale Cooper (Kyle MacLachlan) took over upon his return to the real world.

While it seemed apparent that Evil Cooper made the fake version of himself to act as a replacement who would be called back to the Black Lodge in his place, it wasn’t clear what exactly Dougie was or how he came to be. A scene in “Part 14” between Albert (Miguel Ferrer) and Tammy (Chrysta Bell) sheds light on the man who was Dougie.

Read More:‘Twin Peaks’ Review: Big Secrets Spill Out in ‘Part 14,’ But the Truth Lies Within David Lynch’s Dreams

The two discuss the very first Blue Rose case in which FBI agents investigate two women — both who appear to be someone named Lois Duffy — in a hotel room.
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Twin Peaks’ Just Explained How Dougie Came Into This World

‘Twin Peaks’ Just Explained How Dougie Came Into This World
[Editor’s Note: The following review contains spoilers for “Twin Peaks: The Return” Episode 14, “Part 14.”]

Twin Peaks” dropped a major hint on Sunday about the origins of Dougie, the man whom Evil Cooper/Mr. C created as a decoy, and whose life Agent Dale Cooper (Kyle MacLachlan) took over upon his return to the real world.

While it seemed apparent that Evil Cooper made the fake version of himself to act as a replacement who would be called back to the Black Lodge in his place, it wasn’t clear what exactly Dougie was or how he came to be. A scene in “Part 14” between Albert (Miguel Ferrer) and Tammy (Chrysta Bell) sheds light on the man who was Dougie.

Read More:‘Twin Peaks’ Review: Big Secrets Spill Out in ‘Part 14,’ But the Truth Lies Within David Lynch’s Dreams

The two discuss the very first Blue Rose case in which FBI agents investigate two women — both who appear to be someone named Lois Duffy — in a hotel room.
See full article at Indiewire Television »

"Twin Peaks," Episode 14 Recap: Tell Me The Story

  • MUBI
Twin Peaks Recap is a weekly column by Keith Uhlich covering David Lynch and Mark Frost's limited, 18-episode continuation of the Twin Peaks television series.It's James Hurley's (James Marshall) birthday and he wants a present. Not that he's demanding it—no, no. James is cool. He's always been cool. So in that affable way of his that can be equal parts endearing and insufferable, he asks his going-on-23-year-old coworker, Freddie Sykes (Jake Wardle)—a U.K. to U.S. transplant who, like James, is a security guard at the Great Northern Hotel—to explain why he's always wearing a green gardener's glove on his right hand. "Tell me the story," he says to Freddie. The young man obliges the birthday boy with a captivating tale ("you ain't gonna believe me anyway," he prefaces) of a man in the sky called The Fireman, who told him to buy the glove,
See full article at MUBI »

‘Twin Peaks’: Diane’s Style Continues the Problematic Orientalism From the Original Series

‘Twin Peaks’: Diane’s Style Continues the Problematic Orientalism From the Original Series
Twin Peaks” finally introduced fans to Diane, the oft-named but never seen secretary whom FBI Agent Cooper addressed his recordings to in the original 1990s series: David Lynch saved the plum role for one of his favorite actresses, Laura Dern, and her performance has been nothing short of thrilling and moving. Apart from the performance though, the character’s striking style is Orientalist, using Eastern images and themes to evoke a sense of exoticism.

Not much was known about Diane to begin with, since Cooper (Kyle MacLachlan) only ever left recordings for her. It was a one-way exchange that left viewers in the dark. In “The Autobiography of FBI Special Agent Dale Cooper: My Life, My Tapes” written by series co-creator Mark Frost, Cooper offers the only real description of Diane:

“I have been assigned a secretary. Her name is Diane. Believe her experience will be a great help. She seems an interesting cross between a saint and a cabaret singer.”

Read More: ‘Twin Peaks’ and David Lynch’s Love of the Color Red

That summary of the off-screen, off-page character only added more to her air of mystery. Therefore, when we finally meet Dern as Diane, the impact is pronounced, with her striking and unusual appearance: The sleek, platinum blonde bob, the multicolored fingernails that coordinate with her ensemble, and those clothes. The glimpse of each of the three outfits that Diane has worn thus far are showstoppers. They also have a strong Eastern influence in their design.

Diane’s initial look can only be seen from the bust upwards, but its heavy and ornate gold embroidery is Eastern-inflected, and her haircut super-straight styling with heavy bangs is reminiscent of how Asians have been depicted in the past, such as with actress Anna May Wong. While this first glimpse at Diane in Episode 6 isn’t enough to tell her overall aesthetic, Episode 7 certainly gives a clearer idea of her taste.

Read More: ’Twin Peaks’ to ‘Wings’: The 9 Shows That Defined 1990

When Agents Rosenfield and Cole (Miguel Ferrer, David Lynch) visit Diane’s home, she enters the room in a red, silky, kimono-style robe. At that point, the Asian influences cannot be ignored, especially once you add in her home’s decor. A glance around Diane’s house confirms a mix of mid-century modern and Asian pieces ranging from multi-panel screens/room dividers, vases, decorative cranes and black lacquer objects accented with mother of pearl. Even her third outfit, a red and black leather number shows samurai inspirations that gives the illusion of criss-cross styling and a gathered waist.

Diane’s tastes and styling aren’t the most racist or even overt example of Orientalism on the show, but the series does assign its characters quirks that are often the marks of marginalized people. For example, many characters have some sort of physical disability like an eye patch or hearing loss. Making that the most identifiable mark of their characters creates a vicious cycle of reinforcing the perception of their marginalized status: Nadine Hurley (Wendy Robie) isn’t described as the woman whose husband is in love with another woman, but as the kook with the eyepatch. Meanwhile, in the current season, the only Asian character is Naido (Nae Yuuki), the woman without eyes who doesn’t speak in the Purple Room.

Read More: ‘Twin Peaks’ Review: Part 7 Leaves More Clues Than We Can Count as David Lynch Digs Deep Into the Past

Diane’s bold style is used to emphasize her strong personality (“Fuck you, Tammy”) but also her mysterious, exotic qualities that Cooper had tried to encapsulate in his description. Therefore, the Asian trappings are used as costuming and Otherizing to show how interesting and unusual she is. While this practice of using Eastern clothes as costumes was far more prevalent in the past, it still shows up in properties such as “Star Wars” (Princess Amidala’s costumes are very ceremonial Asian, down to the makeup) or critical favorite “Pushing Daisies.”

The Orientalism on “Twin Peaks” was far more pronounced when the show first aired in the 1990s. Although Agent Cooper was a white man teaching Eastern philosophy to solve crimes and Josie Packard (Joan Chen) fulfilled the stereotype of the Asian seductress, the worst affront came in Season 2. Josie’s sister-in-law Catherine Martell for some reason appeared in yellowface for several episodes as a businessman named Mr. Tojamura who sported a samurai hairstyle, spoke in a stereotypical accent and even invoked the bombing of Nagasaki in a conversation. Take a look at that trainwreck below:

Twin Peaks” has come a long way when it comes to its depiction of Eastern cultures as merely costume or lesser-than. Sadly, it seems to have doubled-down on its brutality towards and objectification of women. But more on that later.

Twin Peaks” airs Sundays at 9 p.m. on Showtime.

Stay on top of the latest TV news! Sign up for our TV email newsletter here.

Related storiesBen Stiller Explains the Importance of Celebrating Human Stories that 'Don't Center on Aliens or Robots' -- Nantucket Film Festival'Twin Peaks' Hints at Both Diane's Traumatic Past and Audrey Horne's Fate'Twin Peaks' Review: Part 7 Leaves More Clues Than We Can Count as David Lynch Digs Deep Into the Past
See full article at Indiewire Television »

‘Twin Peaks’: Diane’s Style Continues the Problematic Orientalism From the Original Series

‘Twin Peaks’: Diane’s Style Continues the Problematic Orientalism From the Original Series
Twin Peaks” finally introduced fans to Diane, the oft-named but never seen secretary whom FBI Agent Cooper addressed his recordings to in the original 1990s series: David Lynch saved the plum role for one of his favorite actresses, Laura Dern, and her performance has been nothing short of thrilling and moving. Apart from the performance though, the character’s striking style is Orientalist, using Eastern images and themes to evoke a sense of exoticism.

Not much was known about Diane to begin with, since Cooper (Kyle MacLachlan) only ever left recordings for her. It was a one-way exchange that left viewers in the dark. In “The Autobiography of FBI Special Agent Dale Cooper: My Life, My Tapes” written by series co-creator Mark Frost, Cooper offers the only real description of Diane:

“I have been assigned a secretary. Her name is Diane. Believe her experience will be a great help. She seems an interesting cross between a saint and a cabaret singer.”

Read More: ‘Twin Peaks’ and David Lynch’s Love of the Color Red

That summary of the off-screen, off-page character only added more to her air of mystery. Therefore, when we finally meet Dern as Diane, the impact is pronounced, with her striking and unusual appearance: The sleek, platinum blonde bob, the multicolored fingernails that coordinate with her ensemble, and those clothes. The glimpse of each of the three outfits that Diane has worn thus far are showstoppers. They also have a strong Eastern influence in their design.

Diane’s initial look can only be seen from the bust upwards, but its heavy and ornate gold embroidery is Eastern-inflected, and her haircut super-straight styling with heavy bangs is reminiscent of how Asians have been depicted in the past, such as with actress Anna May Wong. While this first glimpse at Diane in Episode 6 isn’t enough to tell her overall aesthetic, Episode 7 certainly gives a clearer idea of her taste.

Read More: ’Twin Peaks’ to ‘Wings’: The 9 Shows That Defined 1990

When Agents Rosenfield and Cole (Miguel Ferrer, David Lynch) visit Diane’s home, she enters the room in a red, silky, kimono-style robe. At that point, the Asian influences cannot be ignored, especially once you add in her home’s decor. A glance around Diane’s house confirms a mix of mid-century modern and Asian pieces ranging from multi-panel screens/room dividers, vases, decorative cranes and black lacquer objects accented with mother of pearl. Even her third outfit, a red and black leather number shows samurai inspirations that gives the illusion of criss-cross styling and a gathered waist.

Diane’s tastes and styling aren’t the most racist or even overt example of Orientalism on the show, but the series does assign its characters quirks that are often the marks of marginalized people. For example, many characters have some sort of physical disability like an eye patch or hearing loss. Making that the most identifiable mark of their characters creates a vicious cycle of reinforcing the perception of their marginalized status: Nadine Hurley (Wendy Robie) isn’t described as the woman whose husband is in love with another woman, but as the kook with the eyepatch. Meanwhile, in the current season, the only Asian character is Naido (Nae Yuuki), the woman without eyes who doesn’t speak in the Purple Room.

Read More: ‘Twin Peaks’ Review: Part 7 Leaves More Clues Than We Can Count as David Lynch Digs Deep Into the Past

Diane’s bold style is used to emphasize her strong personality (“Fuck you, Tammy”) but also her mysterious, exotic qualities that Cooper had tried to encapsulate in his description. Therefore, the Asian trappings are used as costuming and Otherizing to show how interesting and unusual she is. While this practice of using Eastern clothes as costumes was far more prevalent in the past, it still shows up in properties such as “Star Wars” (Princess Amidala’s costumes are very ceremonial Asian, down to the makeup) or critical favorite “Pushing Daisies.”

The Orientalism on “Twin Peaks” was far more pronounced when the show first aired in the 1990s. Although Agent Cooper was a white man teaching Eastern philosophy to solve crimes and Josie Packard (Joan Chen) fulfilled the stereotype of the Asian seductress, the worst affront came in Season 2. Josie’s sister-in-law Catherine Martell for some reason appeared in yellowface for several episodes as a businessman named Mr. Tojamura who sported a samurai hairstyle, spoke in a stereotypical accent and even invoked the bombing of Nagasaki in a conversation. Take a look at that trainwreck below:

Twin Peaks” has come a long way when it comes to its depiction of Eastern cultures as merely costume or lesser-than. Sadly, it seems to have doubled-down on its brutality towards and objectification of women. But more on that later.

Twin Peaks” airs Sundays at 9 p.m. on Showtime.

Stay on top of the latest TV news! Sign up for our TV email newsletter here.

Related storiesWhy Ben Stiller Put His Comedy Career On Hold After 'Zoolander 2''Twin Peaks' Hints at Both Diane's Traumatic Past and Audrey Horne's Fate'Twin Peaks' Review: Part 7 Leaves More Clues Than We Can Count as David Lynch Digs Deep Into the Past
See full article at Indiewire »

From 'Twin Peaks' to 'American Gods': Welcome to the Golden Age of Weird TV

From 'Twin Peaks' to 'American Gods': Welcome to the Golden Age of Weird TV
An FBI agent communicates with an eyeless woman on some cosmic, supernatural plain while a brain on a stalk issues cryptic orders. A living Goddess swallows a grown man into her vagina while in the middle of sexual intercourse. An international-waters orgy climaxes with a priest nearly forced to fornicate with a fake lioness, not long after tying up a man who claims to be God. A lounge-lizard who lives in a luxury igloo (technically, he resides in some sort of psychic limbo) swills cocktails and sprouts beat poetry. And
See full article at Rolling Stone »

"Twin Peaks," Episodes 3 & 4 Recap: Hell-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o!

Twin Peaks Recap is a weekly column by Keith Uhlich covering David Lynch and Mark Frost's limited, 18-episode continuation of the Twin Peaks television series.What's an FBI Special Agent to do after being locked away for 25 years in unearthly purgatory? Episodes three and four of Mark Frost and David Lynch's revived Twin Peaks, which aired on Showtime this past Sunday in a two-hour block (aside from September's two-part finale, it's all single, hour-long episodes from hereon out), follow our besuited, Black Lodge-incarcerated hero Dale Cooper (Kyle MacLachlan) as he reintegrates into modern terrestrial society. So this is basically Peaks doing Rectify, just with a sterile death row replaced by an infernal hellscape out of Clive Barker. Or David Lynch, really. What's becoming more and more evident as the new Peaks progresses is that the series is, in large part, a repository for Lynch's subconscious, past and present.
See full article at MUBI »

'Twin Peaks' Revival Delves Deeper Into 'Fire Walk With Me' -- and It's Absolutely Insane (Hi Naomi Watts!)

'Twin Peaks' Revival Delves Deeper Into 'Fire Walk With Me' -- and It's Absolutely Insane (Hi Naomi Watts!)
Woo boy, Twin Peaks fans.

If you thought the first two hours of the Twin Peaks revival were weird, you haven't really seen anything yet.

Let's start with what is easily the David Lynch-iest sequence of the show so far.

The Purple Spaceship

After being expelled from the Black Lodge and taking a quick pit stop in the glass box in New York City, real Agent Cooper (Kyle MacLachlan) finds himself in a weird purple spaceship thing with a woman who is listed in the credits as Naido (Nae Yuuki). Her eyes are melted shut, which lends some weight to the idea that eyes are important in Twin Peaks -- Ruth Davenport (Mary Stofle) was missing an eye and it also appeared that Evil Cooper (MacLachlan) shot Phyllis Hastings (Cornelia Guest) through the eye.

The woman eventually disappears and Cooper encounters the shadowy head of Major Garland Briggs (Don S. Davis), who utters the phrase "blue rose
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

Filming Wraps on Showtime’s Twin Peaks Revival, Full Cast Revealed

Showtime announced today that filming has finished on David Lynch and Mark Frost’s Twin Peaks revival series. Ahead of its 2017 premiere, the series’ complete cast—including returning actors as well as those who are new to the series—has been revealed.

Newcomers to the series include Monica Bellucci, Jim Belushi, Michael Cera, Jeremy Davies, Laura Dern, Sky Ferreira, Robert Forster, Meg Foster, Ashley Judd, David Koechner, Jennifer Jason Leigh, Matthew Lillard, Derek Mears, Sara Paxton, Ernie Hudson, Naomi Watts, Trent Reznor, The Walking Dead‘s Josh McDermitt, and many more.

Returning actors include Kyle MacLachlan, Ray Wise, Harry Dean Stanton, Alicia Witt, and more. Below, we have the official press release and full cast list:

Press Release: Los Angeles, CA – April 25, 2016 – Principal photography has concluded on the highly-anticipated new Twin Peaks for Showtime. And today, Showtime, David Lynch and Mark Frost are revealing a key piece of the mystery:
See full article at DailyDead »

The 'Twins Peaks' Revival Cast List Is Insane (and Insanely Long)

Showtime revealed the full cast list for its upcoming "Twin Peaks" revival, and it's nothing short of insane -- and insanely long.

The ensemble includes a whopping 217 actors -- yes, you read that right -- and amid all the returning faces, there are also a bunch of surprising, big-name newbies along for the ride this time around. (We've embedded the entire list at the end of this post.)

Original cast members that will be back include many previously-announced people, and the ensemble will feature the likes of Kyle MacLachlan, Sherilyn Fenn, Madchen Amick, Sheryl Lee, Dana Ashbrook, David Duchovny, Miguel Ferrer, Grace Zabriskie, Peggy Lipton, Ray Wise, Wendy Robie, Russ Tamblyn, and Catherine E. Coulson, among many others.

As for the newcomers, some of the bold names that stand out include Monica Bellucci, Jim Belushi, Michael Cera, Laura Dern, Jay R. Ferguson (a.k.a. Stan from "Mad Men"), Ernie Hudson ("Ghostbusters"), Ashley Judd,
See full article at Moviefone »

Big Names On "Twin Peaks" Cast List Of 217

The new "Twin Peaks" isn't slated to debut on Showtime until 2017, but a flurry of speculation about it happened last week with a tweet from Go For Locations indicating that filming had wrapped on the "first two seasons" of the series.

The episode count for the David Lynch-directed series was always in question, but that tweet suggested we'd be getting even more episodes than originally planned. Said tweet has since been deleted, so we'll have to wait to see how that pans out.

in the meantime in more official news, Showtime, Lynch and Mark Frost has released the official cast list for the new series with a whopping 217 names across the various episodes - a list that includes some real surprise big name inclusions such as Monica Bellucci, Michael Cera, Naomi Watts, Tim Roth, Jennifer Jason Leigh, Eddie Vedder, Ashley Judd, Ernie Hudson, Jim Belushi, Richard Chamberlain, Laura Dern,
See full article at Dark Horizons »

Harpoon! Slasher Fun on the High Seas. With Harpoons!

How can you not be intrigued by a title like “Harpoon: Reykjavik Whale Watching Massacre”? It got me with “Harpoon”. Of course, a blurb calling it “The Texas Chainsaw Massacre on a whaler” didn’t hurt, either. I mean, how many slasher films have you seen set on a whaler? That’s a new one. Great harpooning fun is guaranteed when the film lands on DVD in the UK May 2010 courtesy of E1 Entertainment. Check out a teaser trailer below. An epic tale about a group of whale watchers, whose ship breaks down and they get picked up by a whale fisher vessel. The Fishbillies on the vessel has just gone bust, and everything goes out of control. Starring Pihla Viitala, Nae, Terence Anderson, Miranda Hennessy, Aymen Hamdouchi, Carlos Takeshi, Miwa Yanagizawa, Halldóra Geirharðsdóttir, Guðlaug Ólafsdóttir, Snorri Engilbertsson, Gunnar Hansen, and directed by Júlíus Kemp.
See full article at Beyond Hollywood »

White On Rice Review

[Our thanks to regular Twitch reader Indiemaker for the following review of Dave Boyle's indie comedy White on Rice.]

White on Rice is a film that has slowly but surely garnered its fair share of buzz these past few months. I know Todd posted a brief review over the summer and I suspect the film is going to become a substantial cult célèbre even if it may be a while before many of you get a chance to see it.

White on Rice has become something of a festival darling and rousing crowd pleaser throughout its extensive fest play.  The film is currently being self promoted and independently distributed by its writer/director David Boyle. So if you're anxious to see it now, you need to go to the website and beg Dave to personally bring it to your town.

I'm sure the director is becoming more and more wary of all of the comparisons being made in reviews to Napoleon Dynamite.  Let me say they're unwarranted even if
See full article at Screen Anarchy »
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