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Weird Al, Finn Wolfhard & more to star in Willy Wonka live concert event!

  • JoBlo
Throughout the years, Roald Dahl's classic children's novel "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory" has been adapted into a variety of entertainment mediums. There's Mel Stuart's 1971 film, a Broadway adaptation, Tim Burton's visually splediferous version of the tale, and Tom & Jerry cartoon crossover, and even a full album of the Willy Wonka... Read More...
See full article at JoBlo »

Moscow Never Sleeps Movie Review

  • ShockYa
Moscow Never Sleeps Movie Review
Moscow Never Sleeps Cavu Pictures Director: Johnny O’Reilly Written by: Johnny O’Reilly Cast: Alexey Serebryakov, Evgenia Brik, Yuri Stoyanov, Mikhail Efremov, Lubov Aksenova, Oleg Dolin Screened at: Critics’ link, NYC, 6/16/17 Opens: June 9, 2017 at New York’s Village East Theater In Mel Stuart’s 1969 movie “If it’s Tuesday, This Must be Belgium,” a diverse […]

The post Moscow Never Sleeps Movie Review appeared first on Shockya.com.
See full article at ShockYa »

How to ruin other classic movies by inserting Tom and Jerry

The trailer for the pair’s bizarre remake of Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory has caused online ire but what other films should they also stay well away from?

Tom and Jerry: Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory is a weird film. It’s a cheaply animated, near shot-for-shot remake of the beloved 1971 Mel Stuart movie – containing recognisable scenes, likenesses and backgrounds – that also happens to star Tom and Jerry, the cartoon characters so unsuitable for today’s climate that compilations of their cartoons now have to come with disclaimers where Whoopi Goldberg apologises for how racist they are.

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

TCM Film Festival 2017 Recap

Once again, Wamg attended the 2017 Turner Classic Movie Film Festival in Hollywood, and as always, it did not disappoint!

Ahhh…so many movies, so little time to cover everything, but here are some highlights of my favorite movies of this year’s festival.

Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory (1971)

Shown poolside at the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel, this classic was perfect for opening night. Brightly colored inflatable balls and lights floated in the pool like some of Wonka’s best candies as guests enjoyed snacks and cocktails on a beautiful spring evening. In attendance for this special screening were some of the cast members of the original movie. Miss Veruca Salt herself, Julie Dawn Cole; Mike Teevee, also known as Paris Themmen; and one of the original Oompaloompas, Rusty Goffe.

Along with host Illeana Douglas, they recounted some great memories of being on the set of the film in Germany more than 45 years ago.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Richard Schickel, Influential Time Magazine Film Critic, Dies at 84

Richard Schickel, Influential Time Magazine Film Critic, Dies at 84
Richard Schickel, the longtime film critic for Time magazine who also wrote 37 books, mostly on film, and directed a number of documentaries on film subjects, died on Saturday in Los Angeles of complications from a series of strokes, his family told the Los Angeles Times. He was 84.

“He was one of the fathers of American film criticism,” his daughter, writer Erika Schickel, told the Times. “He had a singular voice. When he wrote or spoke, he had an old-fashioned way of turning a phrase. He was blunt and succinct both on the page and in life.”

He wrote and/or directed more than 30 documentaries, mostly for television.

Schickel shared a 1977 Emmy nomination for the documentary “Life Goes to the Movies” and received two nominations in 1987 for the documentary “Minnelli on Minnelli: Liza Remembers Vincente,” which he directed.

Schickel wrote film reviews for Life magazine from 1965 until the magazine folded in
See full article at Variety - Film News »

'The Eagle Huntress' to kick off Qatar’s Ajyal Film Festival

'The Eagle Huntress' to kick off Qatar’s Ajyal Film Festival
I, Daniel Blake, The Salesman, Under the Shadow and Fire at Sea will also screen at youth-focused festival.

The fourth edition of the Doha Film Institute’s Ajyal Youth Film Festival (Nov 30-Dec 5) kicks off this week with the Mena debut and gala screening of UK director Otto Bell’s Mongolia-set documentary The Eagle Huntress (pictured).

The father and daughter tale about a young girl who defies social convention and the elements of Mongolia’s Altai Mountains to become her community’s first female eagle hunting champion premiered at Sundance earlier this year.

It is among a number of Academy Award hopefuls screening at the youth-focused event alongside Under The Shadow, The Salesman, The Idol and Fire At Sea.

Festival director and CEO of the Doha Film Institute Fatma Al Remaihi said the tale of female empowerment at the heart of The Eagle Huntress chimed with Ajyal’s focus on “positive social change” this edition.

“We’re delighted
See full article at ScreenDaily »

'The Eagle Huntress' to kick off Qatar’s Ajyal

'The Eagle Huntress' to kick off Qatar’s Ajyal
I, Daniel Blake, The Salesman, Under the Shadow and Fire at Sea will also screen at youth-focused festival.

The fourth edition of the Doha Film Institute’s Ajyal Youth Film Festival (Nov 30-Dec 5) kicks off this week with the Mena debut and gala screening of UK director Otto Bell’s Mongolia-set documentary The Eagle Huntress (pictured).

The father and daughter tale about a young girl who defies social convention and the elements of Mongolia’s Altai Mountains to become her community’s first female eagle hunting champion premiered at Sundance earlier this year.

It is among a number of Academy Award hopefuls screening at the youth-focused event alongside Under The Shadow, The Salesman, The Idol and Fire At Sea.

Festival director and CEO of the Doha Film Institute Fatma Al Remaihi said the tale of female empowerment at the heart of The Eagle Huntress chimed with Ajyal’s focus on “positive social change” this edition.

“We’re delighted
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Newswire: New Willy Wonka movie may explore how the candy boy became the candy man

Origin stories are always a slam dunk with audiences. Seriously, go through IMDb and just try to find one example of a prequel detailing how a famous movie character came to be that isn’t considered an instant classic. Don’t bother trying. You can’t do it! That’s why it’s great news that Warner Bros.’ upcoming Willy Wonka film is probably going to provide the much-needed backstory of Roald Dahl’s beloved candy magnate.

In an interview with /Film, producer David Heyman revealed the slimmest slivers of info on the the inchoate film. “It’s not a remake. They’ve done two films, quite different,” he explained, referring to Mel Stuart’s 1971 classic and Tim Burton quixotic 2015 attempt at a reboot. “But it’s possibly an origin story. We’re just in the early stages of it, working with a writer called Simon Rich, which ...
See full article at The AV Club »

All 9 Roald Dahl Movies Ranked From Worst to Best

  • The Wrap
All 9 Roald Dahl Movies Ranked From Worst to Best
Roald Dahl Rankings by Sam Adams Fantastic Mr. Fox (2009) When it comes to Roald Dahl adaptations, there’s Wes Anderson‘s, and then there’s everyone else’s. Stop-motion animation was a logical step for one of the movies’ great miniaturists, and the animal-kingdom setting softens the harshness of Dahl’s worldview, which on screen often hardens into grotesquerie and cynicism. Like most of Anderson’s movies, “Mr. Fox” hides serious melancholy beneath its lacquered surface, just as Dahl’s whimsy mingles with the macabre. Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory (1971) Watched with adult eyes, Mel Stuart’s candy-coated adventure looks awfully threadbare in spots,
See full article at The Wrap »

'I wanted to be Willy Wonka': how Gene Wilder inspired future pastry chefs

Wilder’s role in Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory resonated with children everywhere – but also in the hearts and minds of generations of chefs

The birth of Willy Wonka predated Gene Wilder’s embodiment of him by seven years. Dahl’s book Charlie and the Chocolate Factory first appeared in 1964; Mel Stuart’s retitled adaptation came in 1971. But with Wilder’s passing last week, the world also mourned the passing of the man synonymous with that of the mercurial candy man.

Widely seen and deeply felt, Wilder’s portrayal of the man behind the world’s strangest chocolate factory resonated with children everywhere – but also in the hearts and minds of inchoate pastry chefs who were inspired by the edible teacup and everlasting gobstopper. Rarely mentioned as a food movie, per se, Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory inspired generations to enter into a world of pure imagination.

Continue reading.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Willy Wonka's Violet Beauregarde Recalls Memorable Day on Set When Gene Wilder 'Stole My Heart'

  • PEOPLE.com
Willy Wonka's Violet Beauregarde Recalls Memorable Day on Set When Gene Wilder 'Stole My Heart'
Of the many memorable characters created by the late Gene Wilder, his titular role in Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory carries a specific magical weight - particularly for those who acted alongside him, like former child actress Denise Nickerson (aka Violet Beauregarde). "He created an iconic character," Nickerson tells People of being in the film with Wilder, who died of complications from Alzheimer's at the age of 83. "He did the majority of that himself, his little idiosyncrasies [in character], kicking the ball, whipping the cane, stuff like that, that was all him." The former child actress, who was 13 during filming, remembers
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Let's all reflect on the moment Gene Wilder slammed Tim Burton's 'Willy Wonka'

  • Hitfix
Let's all reflect on the moment Gene Wilder slammed Tim Burton's 'Willy Wonka'
It's fairly common knowledge that Roald Dahl despised Mel Stuart's Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory, the 1971 film adaptation of his classic children's book Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. Not only was he averse to Wilder's performance as eccentric candy-peddler Willy Wonka (the author wanted Spike Milligan for the role), he was irritated that it placed more emphasis on Wonka at the expense of the book's good-hearted hero Charlie Bucket (Peter Ostrum). (For the record, Dahl allegedly hated most adaptations of his books, at one point terming Nicolas Roeg's big-screen interpretation of The Witches "utterly appalling.") So perhaps it's fitting that Tim Burton, who directed the 2005 re-adaptation of Dahl's novel, similarly found the 1971 version lacking, telling BBC News in an interview: "I don't want to crush people's childhood dreams, but the original film is sappy." But while Burton's film proved very successful both critically and commercially -- it grossed
See full article at Hitfix »

Gene Wilder: a comic enigma whose genius shone brightest in collaboration | Hadley Freeman

Enduring partnerships with Richard Pryor, Gilda Radner and Mel Brooks show Wilder’s gift wasn’t just his own mastery, but an ability to coax it from others, too

Anyone who’s read Gene Wilder’s 1970 letter about the costume suggestions for Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory to the movie’s director, Mel Stuart, let alone seen his performance in the film, knows that he was no slouch when it came to creating wise and confident solo performances.

“I don’t think of Willy as an eccentric who holds onto his 1912 Daddy’s Sunday suit and wears it in 1970,” he wrote, “but rather as just an eccentric – where there’s no telling what he’ll do or where he ever found his get-up – except that it strangely fits him … Jodhpurs to me belong more to the dancing master. But once elegant now almost baggy trousers – baggy through preoccupation with more
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Gene Wilder's 10 Greatest Performances

Gene Wilder's 10 Greatest Performances
Everyone's got a favorite Gene Wilder performance: to younger viewers, he's a fondly remembered face in childhood favorites like Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory; to an older filmgoers, he was a brilliantly bawdy performer who owned comedy in the Seventies. At any age, however, he was one of those impossible-to-dislike actors whose very presence had a way of lifting up a film.

Most actors consider it a privilege to land one all-time classic role over the course of their career — Wilder had more than can be counted on one hand.
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Gene Wilder dies, aged 83

Den Of Geek Aug 29, 2016

Some really sad news. The great Gene Wilder has died, it's been confirmed.

Gene Wilder, the actor, writer and director of unforgettable stage and screen comedies, has died from complications from Alzheimer’s disease in Stamford, Connecticut, according to a statement from his nephew. Wilder was 83.

Wilder was diagnosed with non-Hodgkins lymphoma and treated with radiation and stem cell transplants in 1999.

Less than two years after Wilder married Saturday Night Live star Gilda Radner. She was diagnosed with ovarian cancer and died on May 20th 1989, at age 42. Wilder wrote and directed The Woman In Red (1984) and starred in two other films with Radner. After she died, Wilder became actively involved in promoting awareness of ovarian cancer and helped found the Gilda Radner Ovarian Cancer Detection Center in Los Angeles and co-founding Gilda's Club.

Wilder reportedly became a comic performer in order to cheer up his dying mother.
See full article at Den of Geek »

19 Things You Didn't Know About Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory

  • PEOPLE.com
19 Things You Didn't Know About Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory
American treasure and crown jewel in Gene Wilder's spectacular oeuvre Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory turns 45 this week. To celebrate, not only have we justly singled out the crime that was Gene Wilder getting passed over for an Oscar, but we're also giving fans an anniversary-based roundup of obscure facts and trivial bits about everyone's favorite vaguely sinister candy factory. 1. Wilder only accepted the role on one condition In a letter to director Mel Stuart, Wilder wrote that he'd read the script and would take the part on the condition that, "When I make my first entrance, I'd like
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

19 Things You Didn't Know About Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory

  • PEOPLE.com
19 Things You Didn't Know About Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory
American treasure and crown jewel in Gene Wilder's spectacular oeuvre Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory turns 45 this week. To celebrate, not only have we justly singled out the crime that was Gene Wilder getting passed over for an Oscar, but we're also giving fans an anniversary-based roundup of obscure facts and trivial bits about everyone's favorite vaguely sinister candy factory. 1. Wilder only accepted the role on one condition In a letter to director Mel Stuart, Wilder wrote that he'd read the script and would take the part on the condition that, "When I make my first entrance, I'd like
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

TCM Big Screen Classics 2016 Lineup Announced

Discover the stuff that dreams are made of. Hold your breath, make a wish, count to three. Take a day off with Ferris Bueller. Survive a winter in the Overlook Hotel. Movie lovers will be able to do all of this and more in 2016 as Fathom Events partners with Turner Classic Movies (TCM) for the biggest-ever “TCM Big Screen Classics” series.

The not-to-miss lineup begins in January and continues monthly throughout the year as Fathom Events and TCM bring some of the greatest titles ever back into movie theaters, each for just four showings. These classics will each be accompanied by specially produced commentary from TCM hosts Robert Osborne or Ben Mankiewicz.

The series will include “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid,” “Planet of the Apes” and “The King and I” from Twentieth Century Fox; “The Maltese Falcon,” “Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory” and “The Shining” from Warner Bros.; “The Ten Commandments,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

TCM Expands Classic Film Screening Series with Fathom Events

TCM Expands Classic Film Screening Series with Fathom Events
Turner Classic Movies is expanding its partnership with Fathom Events to screen classic films in theaters nationwide.

The partnership began in 2012 with a handful of screenings spread throughout the year. In 2016, titles will be offered on a monthly basis in about 500 theaters, starting in January with 1969’s “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid.”

“The series allows us to bring fans another opportunity to engage with classic movies on the big screen from a variety of studios and eras allowing TCM to be the ultimate movie lover destination,” said TCM general manager Jennifer Dorian.

The screenings include specially produced commentary tracks from TCM hosts Robert Osborne and Ben Mankiewicz.

Here’s the full lineup:

Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969) – Sunday, January 17 and Wednesday, January 20Paul Newman and Robert Redford set the standard for the buddy film with this western classic. Sundance (Redford) is a mighty quick draw, and his partner
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Examining Hollywood Remakes: Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

  • Cinelinx
Remakes have been a big part of the film industry ever since the silent era. As part of our ongoing series, Cinelinx looks at the remake of a beloved classic kid’s film to see how it compares to the original. This week, we look at Tim Burton’s Charlie and the Chocolate Factory (2005) on its tenth anniversary.

In the last article, we talked about how the choice of actors can improve a remake. Sometimes it’s not even a question of a good actor or a bad actor. It’s about the right actor, and the choices he/she makes in the role. In this week’s article, we focus on how the wrong actor can spoil a remake.

Ronald Dahl’s 1964 children’s book “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory” is the tale of a poor boy named Charlie who is one of several kids to win a golden
See full article at Cinelinx »
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