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2017’s Best Films By and About Women

Girls Trip”: Michele K. Short/Universal Pictures

The big screen had a lot to offer in 2017: Amazonian warriors kicking ass (and breaking box office records), tennis stars smashing misogyny, a wildly inventive and Nsfw use of a grapefruit, and so much more. We’ve collected some of our favorite films by and about women this year, and they include biopics about athletes, war movies, and a game-changing super hero film. That’s part of what stands out about this year — the fact that women finally had the opportunity to shine in different genres, both on-screen and behind the scenes. This year’s Best Actress frontrunners aren’t playing the wives of powerful men — they are at the center of their own stories. Finally.

Here are some the year’s best films directed by women and/or about female protagonists, according to us:

Girls Trip” — Co-Written by Tracy Oliver
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Jools Holland webchat – your questions answered on punk, Amy Winehouse and his favourite rapper

The bandleader and television presenter has tickled ivories with the biggest names in music. He told us which musician he’s most in awe of, what late legend he’d like to spend eternity with and his peculiar fear of dying

1.05pm GMT

Thank you so much for joining me and taking the time to think up your eloquent questions. I hope you found my answers satisfactory. I have the honour to remain your humble and obedient servant. I'm sorry there wasn't time to answer them all.

1.04pm GMT

25aubrey asks:

Of all the people you’ve sat alongside tickling the ivories with, who were you most in awe of?

I think many of us will be in awe of the people who we have idolised since our childhood. I remember listening to Gladys Knight when I was a teenager and going to see her at the Lewisham Odeon. So
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

‘Mudbound’: Dee Rees, Faith, and the Long Path She Took to Make Her Epic Oscar Contender

‘Mudbound’: Dee Rees, Faith, and the Long Path She Took to Make Her Epic Oscar Contender
Dee Rees is a tall woman of fierce charisma. She’s the kind of director who talks fast, ideas coming so quickly that those less inclined can barely keep up. And yet her output has been slow: After Focus Features snapped up her breakout 2011 feature debut “Pariah” at Sundance, it was four years before HBO Film’s Emmy and DGA-award-winning 2015 biopic “Bessie.”

“There’s an assumption that men who do small personal movies can leap to deliver larger things,” said “Bessie” producer Shelby Stone. “It’s much harder for women.”

Finally, we get to see Rees fulfill her promise with “Mudbound,” a Sundance triumph that set the 2017 festival sales record with its $12.5 million sale to Netflix, and opened AFI Fest November 9 after wowing crowds at seven film festivals.

When Rees received the Sundance Next Fest Vanguard Award in August, her presenter, “Pariah” star Kim Wayans, said it best: “The introverted,
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

‘Mudbound’: Dee Rees, Faith, and the Long Path She Took to Make Her Epic Oscar Contender

  • Indiewire
‘Mudbound’: Dee Rees, Faith, and the Long Path She Took to Make Her Epic Oscar Contender
Dee Rees is a tall woman of fierce charisma. She’s the kind of director who talks fast, ideas coming so quickly that those less inclined can barely keep up. And yet her output has been slow: After Focus Features snapped up her breakout 2011 feature debut “Pariah” at Sundance, it was four years before HBO Film’s Emmy and DGA-award-winning 2015 biopic “Bessie.”

“There’s an assumption that men who do small personal movies can leap to deliver larger things,” said “Bessie” producer Shelby Stone. “It’s much harder for women.”

Finally, we get to see Rees fulfill her promise with “Mudbound,” a Sundance triumph that set the 2017 festival sales record with its $12.5 million sale to Netflix, and opened AFI Fest November 9 after wowing crowds at seven film festivals.

When Rees received the Sundance Next Fest Vanguard Award in August, her presenter, “Pariah” star Kim Wayans, said it best: “The introverted,
See full article at Indiewire »

Dee Rees to Direct Film Adaptation of Joan Didion’s “The Last Thing He Wanted”

Dee Rees on “Strombo”

Dee Rees has lined up her next project before her latest has even hit theaters. Since its debut at Sundance, “Mudbound” has been earning rave reviews and causing plenty of Oscar buzz. Rees will follow up the epic story of family, friendship, and racism in the post-wwii South with a film adaptation of a Joan Didion’s 1996 best-seller “The Last Thing He Wanted.” Deadline reports that she’ll helm the political thriller, which follows a Washington Post journalist who becomes involved in the world of arms dealing.

Marco Villalobos is penning the script.

Rees made her feature debut with 2011’s “Pariah,” a semi-autobiographical drama centering on a Brooklyn-based lesbian teen exploring her sexuality and coming-of-age. Rees won the John Cassavetes Award at the Independent Spirit Awards and the Gotham for Best Breakthrough Director for the film, and followed it up with Emmy winner “Bessie,” an HBO TV movie starring Queen Latifah as blues performer Bessie Smith.

Mudbound” scored the biggest deal out of Sundance, with Netflix paying $12.5 million for the ensemble drama. Set in rural Mississippi, the story follows two young men, one black and one white, as they return from WWII to work on a farm. The cast includes Garrett Hedlund (“Unbroken”), Jason Mitchell (“Detroit”), Carey Mulligan (“Suffragette”), and Mary J. Blige (“The Wiz Live!”). Many are speculating that the film could earn awards recognition, including nods for Rees as co-writer and director. “Mudbound” will launch on Netflix and select theaters November 17.

Dee Rees to Direct Film Adaptation of Joan Didion’s “The Last Thing He Wanted” was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Brother Can You Spare a Dime

It’s 1930s America as seen in the movies, through music, and the evasions of newsreels. Franklin Delano Roosevelt preaches prosperity while James Cagney slugs out the decade as a smart-tongued everyman — in a dozen different roles. Director Philippe Mora investigates what was then a new kind of revisionist info-tainment formula: applying old film footage to new purposes.

Brother Can You Spare a Dime

DVD

The Sprocket Vault

1975 / B&W / 1:33 flat full frame / 106 min. / Street Date ?, 2017 / available through The Sprocket Vault / 14.99 (also available in Blu-ray)

Film Editor: Jeremy Thomas

Research by Michael Barlow, Jennifer E. Ryan, Susan Winslow

Produced by Sanford Lieberson, David Puttnam

Directed by Philippe Mora

Years before he was briefly sidetracked into sequels for The Howling, Philippe Mora was an accomplished artist and documentary filmmaker. Backed by producers Sanford Lieberson and David Puttnam, his 1974 documentary Swastika pulled a controversial switch on the usual historical fare about
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Vera Farmiga Joins Cast of Anthology Series ‘Philip K. Dick’s Electric Dreams’

Vera Farmiga Joins Cast of Anthology Series ‘Philip K. Dick’s Electric Dreams’
Oscar- and Emmy-nominated actress Vera Farmiga will follow “Bates Motel” by checking in to another TV series, having signed on to star in an episode of Channel 4 anthology series “Philip K. Dick’s Electric Dreams.” Farmiga will star alongside actor Mel Rodriguez (“The Last Man on Earth”) in an episode entitled “Kill All Others,” from Emmy-nominated U.S. writer-director Dee Rees.

Farmiga plays a politician who makes a shocking statement encouraging violence. Rodriguez plays the one man who dares to question the situation and finds himself an instant target. “Straight Outta Compton” star Jason Mitchell, Glenn Morshower and Sarah Brown co-star in the episode.

Farmiga received an Academy Award nomination for her supporting role in Jason Reitman’s 2009 film “Up in the Air.” She was nominated for an Emmy in 2013 for her leading role as Norma Bates in A+E Networks’ “Bates Motel.” Rees was nominated for two Emmys for co-writing and directing single-drama TV biopic
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Tony-Winning Broadway Legend Linda Hopkins Dies at 92

Tony-Winning Broadway Legend Linda Hopkins Dies at 92
Linda Hopkins, who starred in musicals like Inner City and the one-woman show Me and Bessie, has died at 92. Her death was confirmed by her great-niece Hazel Lindsey, according to the The New York Times.

The famed gospel singer performed for over 40 years before making her Broadway debut in Inner City, later winning a Tony for her role in 1972.

“So far as I’m concerned, they can throw away the rest of Inner City and just let a lady named Linda Hopkins stand there all night, tapping one foot slightly, opening her composed mouth to let miraculous sounds come out of it,
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Netflix Buys ‘Mudbound’ for $12.5 Million — Sundance 2017

  • Indiewire
Netflix Buys ‘Mudbound’ for $12.5 Million — Sundance 2017
Netflix has acquired the drama “Mudbound,” which premiered on January 21 in the Sundance Film Festival’s Premieres section. Netflix paid $12.5 million for the U.S. rights and other select rights to the film, Deadline reports. Good Universe previously sold the rights to multiple territories for the film.

Read More: ‘Mudbound’ Review: Dee Rees Enters the Big Leagues With Sweeping Period Epic — Sundance 2017

Directed by Dee Rees and set in the post-World War II rural Mississippi, “Mudbound” tells the story of two families pitted against the social hierarchy of 1940’s American south. When Ronsel (Jason Mitchell) and Jamie (Garrett Hedlund) return from war to life on a farm, their unique friendship challenges the already strained relationship between the two families. “Mudbound” is based on author Hillary Jordan’s 2009 novel of the same name, and features an ensemble cast that includes Jason Clarke, Carey Mulligan, Rob Morgan, and Mary J. Blige.

Rees
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Mudbound’ Is a Major Step For Dee Rees, But Underrepresented Storytellers Remain — Sundance 2017

  • Indiewire
‘Mudbound’ Is a Major Step For Dee Rees, But Underrepresented Storytellers Remain — Sundance 2017
Expectations are very high for filmmaker Dee Rees. The Tennessee-born writer-director’s 2011 debut “Pariah” and 2015 HBO drama “Bessie” were both critically acclaimed, award-winning films, and her newest feature, “Mudbound,” is one of the the most anticipated movies at this year’s Sundance Film Festival.

Read More: Michael Showalter’s Second Act: How the ‘The Big Sick’ Filmmaker Reinvented His Career — Sundance 2017

Set in the post-World War II rural Mississippi, the film tells the story of two families pitted against the social hierarchy of 1940’s American south. When Ronsel (Jason Mitchell) and Jamie (Garrett Hedlund) return from war to life on a farm, their unique friendship challenges the already strained relationship between the two families. “Mudbound” is based on author Hillary Jordan’s 2009 novel of the same name, and features an ensemble cast that includes Jason Clarke, Carey Mulligan, Rob Morgan, and Mary J. Blige.

Rees was not familiar with
See full article at Indiewire »

Sundance 2017: 10 Reasons Why This Year’s Festival Is Essential for Queer Cinema

Sundance 2017: 10 Reasons Why This Year’s Festival Is Essential for Queer Cinema
Film historian B. Ruby Rich credits the 1992 Sundance Film Festival as the cradle of New Queer Cinema, and a quick survey of this year’s festival lineup confirms that Lgbt films stand an excellent chance of attracting audiences. Lesbian filmmaker Dee Rees’ “Mudbound” is one of the most talked about films of the year, trans director Yance Ford’s deeply personal “Strong Island” has been years in the making, and we may have the British “Brokeback Mountain” (but better) with Francis Lee’s “God’s Own Country.”

Perusing the slate of queer films, filmmakers, and performers at Sundance this year, 2017 is set to be the best year queer cinema has seen in a long time. Here’s 10 reasons why:

Read More: 10 Surprises and Hidden Gems from the 2017 Sundance Lineup

Dee Rees is About to Become the Most Successful Black Lesbian Director in Hollywood

Queer audiences have known Dee Rees since
See full article at Indiewire »

Carey Mulligan, Jason Clarke, Garrett Hedlund and Jason Mitchell to join Mudbound adaptation

Variety has reported details on the cast for Mudbound, the latest effort from acclaimed director Dee Rees (Bessie), with Carey Mulligan (Far From The Madding Crowd), Jason Clarke (Terminator Genisys), Garrett Hedlund (Pan) and Jason Mitchell (Straight Outta Compton) all in talks to star.

Scripted by 24 and E.R. writer Virgil Williams, the film is based on the acclaimed book by Hillary Jordan, which tells the story of “around a city worker in a WWII-torn country who relocates his family to a failing Mississippi farm and is forced to overcome insurmountable hardships, including his brother’s return from war.”

Director Rees won praise for her last film, Bessie, the television adaptation of the life of Bessie Smith, the legendary blues performer from the 1930’s. Star Queen Latifah won a SAG award for her performance, as well as a Golden Globe nomination. Rees won a Primetime Emmy for her directing on the film.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Review: ‘Race’ Falls Just Short of a Gold Medal

Hollywood seems to pride itself on biopics of historical Black figures. Over the past several years, Jackie Robinson, James Brown and Bessie Smith’s stories have all gotten the film treatment. This year, it’s Olympic Gold medalist and track star Jesse Owens’ turn in the film “Race”. During the Great Depression and the height of Hitler’s Nazi regime in Germany, Owens defied all odds. He was not only the fastest man in the world, but he also became the face of America at the Berlin Olympic Games in 1936. “Race”, which stars “Selma” actor Stephan James, is about Owens' incredible rise and unprecedented success. Film studios often get biopics wrong because they present a glossy...
See full article at ShadowAndAct »

Review: ‘Race’ Falls Just Short of a Gold Medal

Hollywood seems to pride itself on biopics of historical Black figures. Over the past several years, Jackie Robison, James Brown and Bessie Smith’s stories have all gotten the film treatment. This year, it’s Olympic Gold medalist and track star Jesse Owens’ turn in the film “Race”. During the Great Depression and the height of Hitler’s Nazi regime in Germany, Owens defied all odds. He was not only the fastest man in the world, but he also became the face of America at the Berlin Olympic Games in 1936. “Race”, which stars “Selma” actor Stephan James, is about Owens' incredible rise and unprecedented success. Film studios often get biopics wrong because they present a glossy version...
See full article at ShadowAndAct »

Spotlight, Leonardo DiCaprio, Idris Elba, Brie Larson And Alicia Vikander Big Winners At 22nd SAG Awards

The Screen Actors Guild Awards presented its coveted Actor statuettes for the outstanding motion picture and primetime television performances of 2015 at the 22nd Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards held Saturday, Jan. 30 at the Los Angeles Shrine Exposition Center.

Honored with individual awards were Leonardo DiCaprio, Idris Elba, Brie Larson and Alicia Vikander for performances in motion pictures, and Uzo Aduba, Viola Davis, Idris Elba, Queen Latifah, Kevin Spacey and Jeffrey Tambor for performances in television.

The Screen Actors Guild Awards originated awards for the outstanding performances by a motion picture cast and by television drama and comedy ensembles. The Actor for a motion picture cast performance went this year to Spotlight, while the Actors for television drama and comedy ensemble performances went this year to “Downton Abbey” and “Orange is the New Black”.

Tina Fey and Amy Poehler presented Carol Burnett with the 52nd Life Achievement Award, following a filmed salute to the comedic trailblazer,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

SAG Awards Winners; Including Photo Galleries From The Ceremony

SAG Awards Winners: The 22nd annual awards winners were announced at a ceremony in Los Angeles. SAG Awards Winners

Last night, the Screen Actors Guild dished out their 2016 awards in a ceremony in Hollywood. The SAG awards winners are listed below as well as a full gallery from the evening.

The clear winner on the night was Idris Elba, who managed to grab two awards; one for Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Supporting Role for his role in the superb Beasts Of No Nation, and Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Television Movie or Miniseries for Luthor.

SAG Awards Winners

Elsewhere, Leonardo DiCaprio won Male Actor in a Leading Role for The Revenant, while Brie Larson scored Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Leading Role for Room. Surely these two are now a cert for Oscar success. In the female supporting category, Alicia Vikander
See full article at The Hollywood News »

‘Spotlight,’ Leonardo DiCaprio, and Brie Larson Lead 2016 SAG Award Winners

In naming Spotlight one of the best ensembles of 2016, we said, “Tom McCarthy’s procedural moves with the precision of a fine timepiece. Rarely does one find a film where all is tune, from the pacing, writing, direction and acting. Highlighting the heroic work of the Boston Globe’s Spotlight team, the group is headed by Robby Robinson (Michael Keaton) who risks life long friendships to get the story right. His team includes Mike Rezendes (played by a compulsive Mark Ruffalo), Sacha Pfeiffer (Rachel McAdams) and Matt Caroll (Brian d’Arcy James). Encouraged by a Boston outsider, editor Marty Baron (Live Schreiber), the team undertakes a long-term investigation of abuses in the Catholic Church. In the mix are the lawyers on both sides, played by Stanley Tucci and Billy Crudup. Rightfully overshadowing that other journalism docudrama, James Vanderbilt’s incompetent Truth, the difference here amongst many things is perhaps access:
See full article at The Film Stage »

SAG Award Winners Reflect TV’s Imperative to Embrace Diversity

SAG Award Winners Reflect TV’s Imperative to Embrace Diversity
The first 20 minutes of the 22nd annual SAG Awards reinforced television’s new world order on multiple levels. Netflix and Amazon dominated the wins throughout the night, and the level of diversity among the TV winners was impossible to miss in light of the outcry over this year’s all-white field of Oscar acting nominees.

“Ladies and gentlemen, welcome to diverse TV,” Idris Elba quipped during the telecast. Elba was a double winner for supporting actor in a film for Netflix’s “Beasts of No Nation” and for actor in a TV movie/miniseries for BBC America’s “Luther.”

Wins for Viola Davis, Queen Latifah, Uzo Aduba and Elba underscored how the depth and breadth of television programming has fostered meaty roles for actors that reflect the expanse of America. The fact that television is a medium piped into America’s living rooms and smartphones gives it an imperative to
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Here Are the 2016 SAG Awards Winners

It's time for the 22nd annual Screen Actors Guild Awards, where film and TV actors celebrate other film and TV actors, and the big screen winners cross their fingers that this means they'll be getting Oscars, too. Lookin' at you, Leo!

Here is the full list of SAG Awards winners from the Saturday, January 30 show (8 to 10 p.m. on TNT and TBS), along with the nominees they beat for the trophies:

Winners: Movies

• Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Motion Picture

Winner: Spotlight

Beasts Of No Nation

The Big Short

Straight Outta Compton

Trumbo

• Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Leading Role

Winner: Leonardo DiCaprio / Hugh Glass – "The Revenant"

Bryan Cranston / Dalton Trumbo – "Trumbo"

Johnny Depp / James "Whitey" Bulger – "Black Mass"

Michael Fassbender / Steve Jobs – "Steve Jobs"

Eddie Redmayne / Einar Wegener/Lili Elbe – "The Danish Girl" )

Here's a vine of Leo running to Kate Winslet after he won.
See full article at Moviefone »

Mo'Nique on Oscars Controversy: I Won't Boycott, But I Won't Watch, Either

Mo'Nique on Oscars Controversy: I Won't Boycott, But I Won't Watch, Either
In February 2015, Mo'Nique roiled the industry by revealing to The Hollywood Reporter that Lee Daniels — who directed her to an Oscar victory in 2009's Precious — told her she'd been "blackballed" over "difficult" behavior. Turns out that wasn't quite the case. In the year that followed, the Georgia-based actress-comedian reemerged from a six-year screen hiatus, playing singer Ma Rainey in Bessie, an HBO movie about blues legend Bessie Smith, and the religious mother of a gay teen son in the indie drama Blackbird. Now 48, Mo'Nique divides much of her time between touring as a comic and raising three

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See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »
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