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Hour of the Gun

It’s the one saga of the Gunfight at the O.K. Corral that puts Western legend into proper perspective as to the nature of money, power and the law: Edward Anhalt’s vision is of a gangland turf war with sagebrush and whiskey bottles. James Garner is a humorless Wyatt Earp, matched by Jason Robards’ excellent Doc Holliday. It’s one of John Sturges’ best movies.

Hour of the Gun

Blu-ray

Twilight Time

1967 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 101 min. / Street Date September 19, 2017 / Available from the Twilight Time Movies Store 29.95

Starring: James Garner, Jason Robards, Robert Ryan, Albert Salmi, Charles Aidman, Steve Ihnat, Michael Tolan, William Windom, Lonny Chapman, Larry Gates, William Schallert, Jon Voight.

Cinematography: Lucien Ballard

Art Direction: Alfred C. Ybarra

Film Editor: Ferris Webster

Original Music: Jerry Goldsmith

Written by Edward Anhalt

Produced and Directed by John Sturges

Producer-director John SturgesHour of the Gun was a dismal non-performer in
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Tobor the Great

Robot roll call! This also-ran robotic fantasy from the 1950s is precisely the kind of movie one would expect from Republic, a two-fisted anti-Commie tract for juveniles. The studio comes up with an impressive robo-hero, but short-changes us when it come time for action thrills. Still, as pointed out in Richard Harland Smith’s new commentary, Tobor filled the the kiddie hunger for sci-fi matinees, at least until Robby the Robot came along.

Tobor the Great

Blu-ray

Kl Studio Classics

1954 / B&W / 1:85 widescreen / 77 min. / Street Date September 12, 2017 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95

Starring: Charles Drake, Karin Booth, Billy Chapin, Taylor Holmes, Steven Geray, Hal Baylor, Alan Reynolds, Peter Brocco, Robert Shayne, Lyle Talbot, William Schallert

Cinematography: John L. Russell

Production Design: Gabriel Scognamillo

Special Effects: Howard and Theodore Lydecker

Film Editor: Basil Wrangell

Original Music: Howard Jackson

Written by Philip MacDonald, Carl Dudley

Produced by Richard Goldstone

Directed by Lee Sholem
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July 11th Blu-ray & DVD Releases Include Species Collector’s Edition, Pulse (2001)

July 11th is chock-full of some stellar cult classic releases on Blu-ray and DVD, so hopefully you guys have been saving your pennies. Scream Factory is keeping busy with a trio of titles, including The Man From Planet X, a Collector’s Edition Blu-ray for Species, and Sex Doll. Arrow Video has put together a stunning special edition set for Kiyoshi Kurosawa’s Pulse that you’ll definitely want to add to your home media collections, and both The Fifth Element and Peter Jackson’s King Kong are getting a 4K release, too.

Other notable titles for July 11th include Star Crystal, Vampire Cop, The Blessed Ones, Devil’s Domain, The Magicians: Season Two and a Don’t Look in the Basement/Don’t Look in the Basement 2 double feature.

The Man From Planet X (Scream Factory, Blu-ray)

From the farthest reaches of space it came … is it friend or foe?
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Contest: Win The Man From Planet X on Blu-ray

Scream Factory sets their sights on the stars to bring a visitor from deep space onto Blu-ray with their July 11th home media release of The Man from Planet X, and we've been provided with three Blu-ray copies of the 1951 sci-fi film to give away to lucky Daily Dead readers.

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Prize Details: (3) Winners will receive (1) Blu-ray copy of The Man from Planet X.

How to Enter: We're giving Daily Dead readers multiple chances to enter and win:

1. Instagram: Following us on Instagram during the contest period will give you an automatic contest entry. Make sure to follow us at:

https://www.instagram.com/dailydead/

2. Email: For a chance to win via email, send an email to contest@dailydead.com with the subject “The Man from Planet X Contest”. Be sure to include your name and mailing address.

Entry Details: The contest will end at 12:01am Est on July 17th.
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The Man from Planet X

The first visitor from outer space in the ’50s sci-fi boom is one very curious guy, dropping to Earth in a ship like a diving bell and scaring the bejesus out of Sally Field’s mother. Micro-budgeted space invasion fantasy gets off to a great start, thanks to the filmmaking genius of our old pal Edgar G. Ulmer.

The Man from Planet X

Blu-ray

Scream Factory / Shout! Factory

1951 / B&W / 1:37 flat Academy / 71 min. / Street Date July 11, 2017 / 27.99

Starring: Robert Clarke, Margaret Field, Raymond Bond, William Schallert, Roy Engel, David Ormont.

Cinematography: John L. Russell

Film Editor: Fred R. Feitshans, Jr.

Original Music: Charles Koff

Written and Produced by Aubrey Wisberg, Jack Pollexfen

Directed by Edgar G. Ulmer

One of the first features of the 1950s Sci-Fi boom, 1951’s The Man from Planet X set a lot of precedents, cementing the public impression of ‘little green men from Mars’ and
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Trustin Howard, Singer, Actor and 'Joey Bishop Show' Writer, Dies at 93

Trustin Howard, a singer, actor and nightclub stalwart who served as the head writer for the 1960s late-night talk show hosted by Joey Bishop, has died. He was 93.

Howard, who often performed under the name Slick Slavin, died April 20 at West Hills (Calif.) Hospital of complications suffered from a fall, his sister, Susan Slavin, announced.

In 1963, Howard provided the voice of the cartoon character Philbert for an innovative pilot about an animator (William Schallert) whose creation comes to life. Created by Friz Freleng and directed by Richard Donner, the early attempt...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - TV News »

Trustin Howard, Singer, Actor and 'Joey Bishop Show' Writer, Dies at 93

Trustin Howard, a singer, actor and nightclub stalwart who served as the head writer for the 1960s late-night talk show hosted by Joey Bishop, has died. He was 93.

Howard, who often performed under the name Slick Slavin, died April 20 at West Hills (Calif.) Hospital of complications suffered from a fall, his sister, Susan Slavin, announced.

In 1963, Howard provided the voice of the cartoon character Philbert for an innovative pilot about an animator (William Schallert) whose creation comes to life. Created by Friz Freleng and directed by Richard Donner, the early attempt...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Panther Girl of the Kongo

Did Republic’s serial-makers lose their marbles? This is an endurance test of a thriller, with 12 chapters that refuse to advance a story beyond the same repetitive ambushes and fistfights. It’s got monsters in the form of giant crawfish bred to… well, bred for almost no reason at all. With Phyllis Coates and Myron Healey. I tell you, watching this feels like watching an endless loop. But hey, it’s quite handsomely filmed!

Panther Girl of the Kongo

Blu-ray

Olive Films

1955 / B&W / 1:37 flat full frame (originally widescreen) / 168 min. / Street Date February 21, 2017 / available through the Olive Films website / 29.95

Starring: Phyllis Coates, Myron Healey, Arthur Space, John Day, Mike Ragan, Morris Buchanan, Roy Glenn, Archie Savage, Ramsay Hill, Naaman Brown, Dan Ferniel, James Logan, Steve Calvert.

Cinematography: Bud Thackery

Film Editor: Cliff Bell

Original Music: R. Dale Butts

Written by Ronald Davidson

Produced and Directed by Franklin Adreon

Ah yes.
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Screen Actors Guild Awards 2017: Mary Tyler Moore, Carrie Fisher and Debbie Reynolds Honored During Touching In Memoriam

Carrie Fisher, Debbie Reynolds and Mary Tyler Moore were just a few of the famous faces that were honored during the in memoriam at Sunday evening’s Screen Actors Guild Awards.

Hosted live from the Shrine Auditorium in Los Angeles, Moore — who passed away Wednesday — and the mother-daughter duo — who died one day apart in December — were some of the many late actors and actresses that were recognized on-screen at the annual awards show for their contribution to the world of film and television.

In a touching tribute, the SAG Awards honored the men — Ken Howard, William Schallert, Jack Riley,
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Emmys 2016: How the Awards Show Managed to Not Suck This Year

Emmys 2016: How the Awards Show Managed to Not Suck This Year
Now there's something you don't see too often — an Emmy night that actually makes good television. The Emmys are usually one of those pop-culture Zen koans: Why is an award show for TV such a painful little hate-watch? But this year's model was easily the most entertaining Emmy bash since Conan O'Brien hosted in 2008, a welcome change after last year's debacle. Jimmy Kimmel kept things moving and got the whole event done and dusted in three hours — with a minute or two to spare, actually. Yes, there was still plenty
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Shield for Murder

Dirty cops were a movie vogue in 1954, and Edmond O'Brien scores as a real dastard in this overachieving United Artists thriller. Dreamboat starlet Marla English is the reason O'Brien's detective kills for cash, and then keeps killing to stay ahead of his colleagues. And all to buy a crummy house in the suburbs -- this man needs career counseling. Shield for Murder Blu-ray Kl Studio Classics 1954 / B&W / 1:75 widescreen / 82 min. / Street Date June 21, 2016 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95 Starring Edmond O'Brien, Marla English, John Agar, Emile Meyer, Carolyn Jones, Claude Akins, Herbert Butterfield, Hugh Sanders, William Schallert, Robert Bray, Richard Deacon, David Hughes, Gregg Martell, Stafford Repp, Vito Scotti. Cinematography Gordon Avil Film Editor John F. Schreyer Original Music Paul Dunlap Written by Richard Alan Simmons, John C. Higgins from the novel by William P. McGivern <Produced by Aubrey Schenck, (Howard W. Koch) Directed by Edmond O'Brien, Howard W. Koch

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Here's the kind of '50s movie we love, an ambitious, modest crime picture that for its time had an edge. In the 1950s our country was as blind to the true extent of police corruption as it was to organized crime. Movies about bad cops adhered to the 'bad apple' concept: it's only crooked individuals that we need to watch out for, never the institutions around them. Thanks to films noir, crooked cops were no longer a film rarity, even though the Production Code made movies like The Asphalt Jungle insert compensatory scenes paying lip service to the status quo: an imperfect police force is better than none. United Artists in the 1950s helped star talent make the jump to independent production, with the prime success stories being Burt Lancaster and Kirk Douglas. But the distribution company also funded proven producers capable of putting out smaller bread 'n' butter movies that could prosper if costs were kept down. Edward Small, Victor Saville, Levy-Gardner-Laven. Aubrey Schenck and Howard C. Koch produced as a team, and for 1954's Shield for Murder Koch co-directed, sharing credit with the film's star, Edmond O'Brien. The show is a smart production all the way, a modestly budgeted 'B' with 'A' ambitions. O'Brien was an industry go-getter trying to channel his considerable talent in new directions. His leading man days were fading but he was in demand for parts in major films like The Barefoot Contessa. The producers took care with their story too. Writers Richard Alan Simmons and John C. Higgins had solid crime movie credits. Author William P. McGivern wrote the novel behind Fritz Lang's The Big Heat as well as Rogue Cop and Odds Against Tomorrow. All of McGivern's stories involve crooked policemen or police corruption. Shield for Murder doesn't tiptoe around its subject matter. Dirty cop Detective Lt. Barney Nolan (O'Brien) kills a hoodlum in an alley to steal $25,000 of mob money. His precinct boss Captain Gunnarson (Emile Meyer) accepts Barney's version of events and the Asst. D.A. (William Schallert) takes the shooting as an open and shut case. Crime reporter Cabot (Herbert Butterfield) has his doubts, and lectures the squad room about the abuse of police power. Barney manages to placate mob boss Packy Reed (Hugh Sanders), but two hoods continue to shadow him. Barney's plan for the money was to buy a new house and escape the rat race with his girlfriend, nightclub cashier Patty Winters (Marla English). But a problem surfaces in the elderly deaf mute Ernst Sternmueller (David Hughes), a witness to the shooting. Barney realizes that his only way forward is to kill the old man before he can tell all to Det. Mark Brewster (John Agar), Barney's closest friend. Once again one of society's Good Guys takes a bite of the forbidden apple and tries to buck the system. Shield for Murder posits an logical but twisted course of action for a weary defender of the law who wants out. Barney long ago gave up trying to do anything about the crooks he can't touch. The fat cat Packy Reed makes the big money, and all Barney wants is his share. Barney's vision of The American Dream is just the middle-class ideal, the desirable Patty Winters and a modest tract home. He's picked it out - it sits partway up a hill in a new Los Angeles development, just finished and already furnished. Then the unexpected witness shows up and everything begins to unravel; Barney loses control one step at a time. He beats a mob thug (Claude Akins) half to death in front of witnesses. When his pal Mark Brewster figures out the truth, Barney has to use a lot of his money to arrange a getaway. More mob trouble leads to a shoot-out in a high school gym. The idea may have been for the star O'Brien to coach actors John Agar and Marla English to better performances. Agar is slightly more natural than usual, but still not very good. The gorgeous Ms. English remains sweet and inexpressive. After several unbilled bits, the woman often compared to Elizabeth Taylor was given "introducing" billing on the Shield for Murder billing block. Her best-known role would be as The She-Creature two years later, after which she dropped out to get married. Co-director O'Brien also allows Emile Meyer to go over the top in a scene or two. But the young Carolyn Jones is a standout as a blonde bargirl, more or less expanding on her small part as a human ashtray in the previous year's The Big Heat. Edmond O'Brien is occasionally a little to hyper, but he's excellent at showing stress as the trap closes around the overreaching Barney Nolan. Other United Artists budget crime pictures seem a little tight with the outdoors action -- Vice Squad, Witness to Murder, Without Warning -- but O'Brien and Koch's camera luxuriates in night shoots on the Los Angeles streets. This is one of those Blu-rays that Los Angelenos will want to freeze frame, to try to read the street signs. There is also little downtime wasted in sidebar plot detours. The gunfight in the school gym, next to an Olympic swimming pool, is an action highlight. The show has one enduring sequence. With the force closing in, Barney rushes back to the unfinished house he plans to buy, to recover the loot he's buried next to its foundation. Anybody who lived in Southern California in the '50s and '60s was aware of the massive suburban sprawl underway, a building boom that went on for decades. In 1953 the La Puente hills were so rural they barely served by roads; the movie The War of the Worlds considered it a good place to use a nuclear bomb against invading Martians. By 1975 the unending suburbs had spread from Los Angeles, almost all the way to Pomona. Barney dashes through a new housing development on terraced plots, boxy little houses separated from each other by only a few feet of dirt. There's no landscaping yet. Even in 1954 $25,000 wasn't that much money, so Barney Nolan has sold himself pretty cheaply. Two more latter-day crime pictures would end with ominous metaphors about the oblivion of The American Dream. In 1964's remake of The Killers the cash Lee Marvin kills for only buys him a patch of green lawn in a choice Hollywood Hills neighborhood. The L.A.P.D. puts Marvin out of his misery, and then closes in on another crooked detective in the aptly titled 1965 thriller The Money Trap. The final scene in that movie is priceless: his dreams smashed, crooked cop Glenn Ford sits by his designer swimming pool and waits to be arrested. Considering how well things worked out for Los Angeles police officers, Edmond O'Brien's Barney Nolan seems especially foolish. If Barney had stuck it out for a couple of years, the new deal for the L.A.P.D. would have been much better than a measly 25 grand. By 1958 he'd have his twenty years in. After a retirement beer bash he'd be out on the road pulling a shiny new boat to the Colorado River, like all the other hardworking cops and firemen enjoying their generous pensions. Policemen also had little trouble getting house loans. The joke was that an L.A.P.D. cop might go bad, but none of them could be bribed. O'Brien directed one more feature, took more TV work and settled into character parts for Jack Webb, Frank Tashlin, John Ford, John Frankenheimer and finally Sam Peckinpah in The Wild Bunch, where he was almost unrecognizable. Howard W. Koch slowed down as a director but became a busy producer, working with Frank Sinatra for several years. He eventually co-produced Airplane! The Kl Studio Classics Blu-ray of Shield for Murder is a good-looking B&W scan, framed at a confirmed-as-correct 1:75 aspect ratio. The picture is sharp and detailed, and the sound is in fine shape. The package art duplicates the film's original no-class sell: "Dame-Hungry Killer-Cop Runs Berserk! The first scene also contains one of the more frequently noticed camera flubs in film noir -- a really big boom shadow on a nighttime alley wall. Kino's presentation comes with trailers for this movie, Hidden Fear and He Ran All the Way. On a scale of Excellent, Good, Fair, and Poor, Shield for Murder Blu-ray rates: Movie: Good Video: Very Good Sound: Excellent Supplements: Trailers for Shield for Murder, Hidden Fear, He Ran All the Way Deaf and Hearing Impaired Friendly? N0; Subtitles: None Packaging: Keep case Reviewed: June 7, 2016 (5115murd)

Visit DVD Savant's Main Column Page Glenn Erickson answers most reader mail: dvdsavant@mindspring.com

Text © Copyright 2016 Glenn Erickson
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Back Inside Innerspace, Joe Dante’s Fantastic Voyage

Stop me if you’ve heard this idea for a movie: Dean Martin gets miniaturized and injected into the body of Jerry Lewis.

That’s the pitch for Joe Dante’s 1987 film Innerspace, his last collaboration with producer Steven Spielberg until making Small Soldiers for DreamWorks in 1998. Made between his contributions to the outrageous 1986 anthology comedy Amazon Women on the Moon and his darkly comic 1989 movie The ’Burbs, Innerspace could be considered Joe Dante’s most commercial film. Not only did it carry the Spielberg brand, it was also cast with big stars (Dennis Quaid, Martin Short, and Meg Ryan) and boasted impressive, state-of-the-art special effects and a high concept that was sure to bring people out to the theater. And yet, for some reason, the movie was something of a box office disappointment when it was released in the summer of 1987; though the film’s final budget is difficult to pin down,
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This Week’s Wamg Podcast – Money Monster, A Bigger Splash, and More!

This week’s episode of our podcast We Are Movie Geeks The Show is up! Hear Wamg’s Jim Batts and Tom Stockman and special guest Lynn Venhaus discuss the weekend box office. We’ll review Money Monster, A Bigger Splash, and The Man Who Knew Infinity. Also, we’ll preview The Nice Guys, Neighbors 2 Sorority Rising, and The Lobster. Lynn will talk about her adventures at The Tennessee Williams Festival over the weekend and we’ll pay tribute to the late actor William Schallert and Jim will talk about the late comic book artist Darwyn Cooke.

Here’s this week’s show. Have a listen:

http://www.wearemoviegeeks.com/wp-content/uploads/Wamg-5-16-54.mp3

The post This Week’s Wamg Podcast – Money Monster, A Bigger Splash, and More! appeared first on We Are Movie Geeks.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Gene Gutowski, Producer of Polanski Films and Holocaust Survivor, Dies at 90

  • The Wrap
Gene Gutowski, Producer of Polanski Films and Holocaust Survivor, Dies at 90
Gene Gutowski, who produced three of Roman Polanski‘s 1960s movies and was a co-producer on the director’s 2002 Oscar winning Holocaust drama, “The Pianist,” has died. He was 90. Gutowski’s son Adam Bardach told the Associated Press that his father died of pneumonia at a hospital in Warsaw, Poland. Gutowski and Polanski collaborated on “Repulsion,” “Cul-de-Sac” and “The Fearless Vampire Killers” in the 1960s. They reunited more than three decades later on “The Pianist.” Also Read: William Schallert, Character Actor and Former SAG President, Dies at 93 The movie was “a personal catharsis” for Gutowski, who wrote that “watching crowds of terrified helpless.
See full article at The Wrap »

Character Actor William Schallert Dead At Age 93

  • CinemaRetro
William Schallert and Patty Duke.

 

Popular character actor William Schallert has died at age 93, having been active in the acting community right up through recent years. Schallert was a familiar face to retro movie and TV fans, even if his name was not as well known. He is remembered by many for playing the harried father of teenage Patty Duke in the 1960s sitcom "The Patty Duke Show". (In a tragic coincidence, Ms. Duke also recently passed away.) Schallert was much beloved by science fiction and horror fans for his appearances in TV series such as "Commander Cody", "Space Patrol", "Men Into Space" and "The Twilight Zone".

Artist Pete Emslie's tribute to Schallert. (For more of Emslie's artistic creations, visit The Cartoon Cave.)

In feature films Schallert appeared in the cult classics "Them!", "The Incredible Shrinking Man", "Colossus: The Forbin Project" as well as the 1983 feature film "Twilight Zone: The Movie
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'Trouble With Tribbles' Guest William Schallert Dies

Mainstream television fans might know him from his days on "The Patty Duke Show," but original "Star Trek" fans are now having to say good-bye to Nilz Baris.That was the character William Schallert played in the popular "Trek" episode "The Trouble With Troubles." Schallert, who would go on to a prolific television and film career with more than 370 credits, died Sunday in Pacific Palisades, California. He was 93.Schallert's character of Baris was an undersecretary in charge of agricultural affairs along the Federation's border with the Klingon Empire, according to Memory Alpha. Baris is the one who brings Capt. Kirk and the USS Enteprise to Deep Space Station K-7 to protect the grain, which was later consumed quite quickly by Tribbles.That was enough to get Baris to threaten Kirk with a hearing ...
See full article at GeekNation »

SAG-aftra Praises “Remarkable” Ex-sag President William Schallert; ‘Patty Duke Show’ Co-Star Dead At 93 – Update

Updated with statement from SAG-aftra: William Shallert, former SAG president and co-star on The Patty Duke Show, died on May 8 in Los Angeles. He was 93. Including stints on Star Trek, the 1967 pic In the Heat of the Night, an uncredited appearance in Steve Martin's The Jerk and HBO’s True Blood among many others, the character actor’s career spanned from 1947-2014, when he appeared in an episode of 2 Broke Girls. SAG-aftra today confirmed Shallert’s passing. "Bill…
See full article at Deadline TV »

William Schallert, Character Actor and Former SAG President, Dies at 93

William Schallert, Character Actor and Former SAG President, Dies at 93
William Schallert, the veteran character actor and former SAG president, died Sunday at the age of 93, TheWrap has confirmed. Schallert’s prolific career — which included almost 400 screen credits — dates back to the 1940s, when he landed a series of small roles in films like “Mighty Joe Young,” “The Reckless Moment,” and “Perfect Strangers.” He would go on to work steadily for the next 60 years, including guest roles on classic TV shows like “The Lone Ranger,” “Get Smart,” and “The Wild, Wild West.” Also Read: Ian Sander, 'Ghost Whisperer' Producer, Dies at 68 One of Schallert’s most iconic roles came when he.
See full article at The Wrap »

William Schallert, Former SAG President and ‘Patty Duke Show’ Star, Dies at 93

William Schallert, Former SAG President and ‘Patty Duke Show’ Star, Dies at 93
Former SAG president William Schallert, best known as TV dad Martin Lane on “The Patty Duke Show,” died Sunday in Pacific Palisades, Calif. He was 93. His son Edwin confirmed his death.

His most memorable role was as beloved TV dad Martin Lane on “The Patty Duke Show” (1963-66). The performance still resonates: TV Guide slotted him at No. 39 on its list of Greatest TV Dads of All Time in 2004.

Schallert would be familiar to many for his memorable appearance on the famous “The Trouble With Tribbles” episode of the original “Star Trek” series: He played Nilz Baris, the agriculture undersecretary who is outraged to discover that the furry, endlessly reproducing aliens have devoured all the grain.

Schallert served as SAG president from 1979-81 and oversaw a three-month strike in 1980 that centered around rates and residuals for pay TV, videocassettes and videodiscs and included a successful boycott of the year’s primetime Emmy Awards.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

William Schallert, Former SAG President and ‘Patty Duke Show’ Star, Dies at 93

William Schallert, Former SAG President and ‘Patty Duke Show’ Star, Dies at 93
Former SAG president William Schallert, best known as TV dad Martin Lane on “The Patty Duke Show,” died Sunday in Pacific Palisades, Calif. He was 93. His son Edwin confirmed his death.

His most memorable role was as beloved TV dad Martin Lane on “The Patty Duke Show” (1963-66). The performance still resonates: TV Guide slotted him at No. 39 on its list of Greatest TV Dads of All Time in 2004.

Schallert would be familiar to many for his memorable appearance on the famous “The Trouble With Tribbles” episode of the original “Star Trek” series: He played Nilz Baris, the agriculture undersecretary who is outraged to discover that the furry, endlessly reproducing aliens have devoured all the grain.

Schallert served as SAG president from 1979-81 and oversaw a three-month strike in 1980 that centered around rates and residuals for pay TV, videocassettes and videodiscs and included a successful boycott of the year’s primetime Emmy Awards.
See full article at Variety - TV News »
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