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1941: A Great Comedy For Slim Pickens Day

On Monday, August 28, 2017, Turner Classic Movies will devote an entire day of their “Summer Under the Stars” series to the late, great Louis Burton Lindley Jr. If that name doesn’t sound familiar, well, then just picture the fella riding the bomb like a buckin’ bronco at the end of Dr. Strangelove…, or the racist taskmaster heading up the railroad gang in Blazing Saddles, or the doomed Sheriff Baker, who gets one of the loveliest, most heartbreaking sendoffs in movie history in Sam Peckinpah’s Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid.

Lindley joined the rodeo circuit when he was 13 and soon picked up the name that would follow him throughout the length of his professional career, in rodeo and in movies & TV. One of the rodeo vets got a look at the lank newcomer and told him, “Slim pickin’s. That’s all you’re gonna get in this rodeo.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Review: "Twice Told Tales" (1963) Starring Vincent Price And Sebastian Cabot; Kino Lorber Blu-ray Special Edition

  • CinemaRetro
By Hank Reineke

On the eve of the November 1963 release of Twice Told Tales, the British actor Sebastian Cabot would tell a reporter from the Copley News Service, “They’ve been after me to do more of the horror pictures with Vincent Price. I wouldn’t mind that a bit, though I must say I wouldn’t want to do them exclusively.” He intimated that he and his co-star had discussed a possible future pairing in “a light comedy” motion-picture. Alas, it was not to be; the two actors would not work together again. Cabot, of course, would soldier on and enjoy success as both a television personality and a recognizable voice-over actor. Following the passing of Boris Karloff in 1969, Vincent Price would reign as the big-screen’s uncontested “King of Horror.” Cabot’s estimation of Price as an actor “extremely adept” at light-comedy was incisive. Throughout his long and fabled career,
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Remembering Kubrick Actress Gray Pt.2: From The Killing to Leech Woman and Off-Screen School Prayer Amendment Fighter

Coleen Gray in 'The Sleeping City' with Richard Conte. Coleen Gray after Fox: B Westerns and films noirs (See previous post: “Coleen Gray Actress: From Red River to Film Noir 'Good Girls'.”) Regarding the demise of her Fox career (the year after her divorce from Rod Amateau), Coleen Gray would recall for Confessions of a Scream Queen author Matt Beckoff: I thought that was the end of the world and that I was a total failure. I was a mass of insecurity and depended on agents. … Whether it was an 'A' picture or a 'B' picture didn't bother me. It could be a Western movie, a sci-fi film. A job was a job. You did the best with the script that you had. Fox had dropped Gray at a time of dramatic upheavals in the American film industry: fast-dwindling box office receipts as a result of competition from television,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Coleen Gray, Star of ‘The Killing’ and ‘Kiss of Death,’ Dies at 92

Coleen Gray, Star of ‘The Killing’ and ‘Kiss of Death,’ Dies at 92
Coleen Gray, best known for her role in Stanley Kubrick’s heist thriller “The Killing,” died of natural causes on Monday at her home in Bel Air, Calif. She was 92.

“My last dame is gone. Always had the feeling she’d be the last to go,” Eddie Muller, founder and president of the Film Noir Foundation, wrote on Facebook. He became friends with Gray while collaborating on his 2001 book “Dark City Dames: The Wicked Women of Film Noir.”

Gray played the accomplice of Sterling Hayden, the leader of a gang of thieves, in Kubrick’s “Killing.” She famously uttered the line, “I may not be pretty and I may not be smart …”

Gray appeared in a slew of films in the late 1940s and ’50s, primarily noir thrillers, including Henry Hathaway’s “Kiss of Death” (1947), as the film’s narrator and ex-con Victor Mature’s love interest; Tyrone Power’s
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Early Kubrick Leading Lady in Classic Film Noir Dead at 92

Coleen Gray ca. 1950. Coleen Gray dead at 92: Leading lady in early Stanley Kubrick film noir classic Actress Coleen Gray, best known for Stanley Kubrick's crime drama The Killing, has died. Her death was announced by Classic Images contributor Laura Wagner on Facebook's “Film Noir” group. Wagner's source was David Schecter, who had been friends with the actress for quite some time. Via private message, he has confirmed Gray's death of natural causes earlier today, Aug. 3, '15, at her home in Bel Air, on the Los Angeles Westside. Gray (born on Oct. 23, 1922, in Staplehurst, Nebraska) was 92. Coleen Gray movies As found on the IMDb, Coleen Gray made her film debut as an extra in the 20th Century Fox musical State Fair (1945), starring Jeanne Crain and Dana Andrews. Her association with film noir began in 1947, with the release of Henry Hathaway's Kiss of Death (1947), notable for showing Richard Widmark
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Kino Lorber Announces Blu-ray / DVD of Twice-Told Tales, Starring Vincent Price

Though he's perhaps best known for writing The Scarlet Letter, author Nathaniel Hawthorne also left his mark on the macabre, penning tales that can still be told to chilling effect around the campfire. Three of these stories made it onscreen in Sidney Salkow's 1963 anthology horror film, Twice-Told Tales. Not long after announcing they are bringing Burnt Offerings to Blu-ray and DVD this October, Kino Lorber has revealed they have another Halloween goodie up their sleeve, as they will also release Twice-Told Tales on Blu-ray and DVD before the flickering flames of jack-o'-lanterns cast shadows across your doorstep.

Via Facebook, Kino Lorber announced they will release Twice-Told Tales (1963) on Blu-ray and DVD with a brand new HD transfer this October.

Directed by Sidney Salkow, Twice-Told Tales stars Vincent Price, Sebastian Cabot, Brett Halsey, Beverly Garland, Richard Denning and Joyce Taylor. Stay tuned to Daily Dead for more updates on this release.
See full article at DailyDead »

I Am Legend: The Greatest Vampire Movie Never Made

The death of Richard Matheson on 22 June 2013 marked the end of an amazing career as a novelist and screenwriter. His most enduring legacy will always be as the author of I Am Legend, arguably one of the finest vampire novels ever written. Considered ‘the very peak of paranoid science fiction,’ Matheson’s groundbreaking debut novel is one of the few contemporary vampire stories that came close to the literary excellence of Bram Stoker’s Dracula.

With plans of a sequel to the Will Smith misfire I Am Legend (2007) being seriously considered by filmmakers, there is only one thing that fans of Matheson’s outstanding post apocalyptic work are asking “when is there going to be a Proper film version of the book?”

Published in 1954, I Am Legend tells the terrifying tale of Robert Neville, the sole survivor of a mysterious airborne virus that has turned everyone, including his wife Virginia and best friend Ben Cortman,
See full article at Shadowlocked »

Sybil Jason Dead at 83: Warner Bros.' Answer to Shirley Temple in the '30s

Sybil Jason, Warner Bros.' answer to Shirley Temple, died Tuesday, August 23, according to film researcher and author Scott O'Brien. She was 83. Born Sybil Jacobson on November 23, 1927, in Cape Town, South Africa, while still a small child she moved to Britain with her parents. Thanks to her uncle Harry Jacobson, reportedly a London orchestra leader and pianist to highly popular entertainer Gracie Fields, by the age of five Sybil was appearing in London nightclubs, where she sang, danced, and mimicked Maurice Chevalier. In 1935, Sybil caught the eye of Irving Asher, the head of Warner Bros. London studio, who had spotted her in a supporting role in the British feature Barnacle Bill. Following a successful film test, she was brought to Hollywood, where the now renamed Sybil Jason was to become Warners' answer to 20th Century Fox's box-office goldmine Shirley Temple. Jason, however, failed to catch on despite working with some
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Looking back at The Last Man On Earth

We take a look back at The Last Man On Earth, the first and most faithful adaptation of Richard Matheson’s classic novel, I Am Legend

When adapted for the big screen, even the finest novels can suffer decidedly mixed fortunes. Richard Matheson's classic 1954 book, I Am Legend, has been made into a movie no fewer than three times, most recently as a big-budget picture of the same name with Will Smith in the lead, but also in 1971 as The Omega Man, and both of these adaptations took considerable liberties with the novel that inspired them.

The best and most faithful adaptation, though, was undoubtedly the first. Filmed in Italy as L'ultimo Uomo Della Terra and starring Vincent Price, The Last Man On Earth was directed by Ubaldo Ragona and Sidney Salkow from a script initially adapted by Matheson himself.

Finished in 1961, but not released in the Us until
See full article at Den of Geek »

More MGM Limited Edition Movies Released

  • Comicmix
Given the success of Warner’s Archive program, we’re thrilled to see other studios scouring their vaults for content aimed at the discerning cinephile. Here’s a release showcasing the latest coming from MGM via Twentieth Century Fox Home Entertainment:

Los Angeles (April 14, 2011) – Twentieth Century Fox Home Entertainment is bringing even more classics to DVD in April through its unique “manufacturing on demand” (“Mod”). The newest group of films will be part of the MGM Limited Edition Collection and available through online retailers. The vast catalog ranges from 1980’s Defiance to 1965’s four-time Academy Award® nominated A Thousand Clowns.

Enjoy your favorite movies from across the decades including:

1950′s

● Davey Crockett, Scout (1950): A U.S. military scout is assigned to stop Indian attacks on a defenseless group of wagon trains making their way West. Stars George Montgomery, Ellen Drew, Noah Beery Jr. Directed by Lew Landers.

Cloudburst
See full article at Comicmix »

See also

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