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Critics Pick the TV Shows That Get Mental Health Right — IndieWire Survey

Critics Pick the TV Shows That Get Mental Health Right — IndieWire Survey
Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of TV critics two questions and publishes the results on Tuesday. (The answer to the second, “What is the best show currently on TV?” can be found at the end of this post.)

This week’s question: What is the best TV show — former or current — that handles mental illness well?

Joyce Eng (@joyceeng61), TVGuide.com

Bojack Horseman,” especially Season 4, is almost peerless when it comes to a raw, honest portrayal of mental health. His depression and anxiety aren’t deployed as plot devices like we’ve seen plenty of times elsewhere; they’re just part of him and none of it is rubbed in your face. He’s allowed to be, break down, self-destruct, and the show never offers quick fixes or easy answers. “Stupid Piece of Sh*t” is a brutal depiction, even if you don’t suffer from depression or anxiety,
See full article at Indiewire Television »

Critics Pick the TV Shows That Get Mental Health Right — IndieWire Survey

  • Indiewire
Critics Pick the TV Shows That Get Mental Health Right — IndieWire Survey
Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of TV critics two questions and publishes the results on Tuesday. (The answer to the second, “What is the best show currently on TV?” can be found at the end of this post.)

This week’s question: What is the best TV show — former or current — that handles mental illness well?

Joyce Eng (@joyceeng61), TVGuide.com

Bojack Horseman,” especially Season 4, is almost peerless when it comes to a raw, honest portrayal of mental health. His depression and anxiety aren’t deployed as plot devices like we’ve seen plenty of times elsewhere; they’re just part of him and none of it is rubbed in your face. He’s allowed to be, break down, self-destruct, and the show never offers quick fixes or easy answers. “Stupid Piece of Sh*t” is a brutal depiction, even if you don’t suffer from depression or anxiety,
See full article at Indiewire »

Clare Douglas obituary

My friend Clare Douglas, who has died aged 73, was a Bafta award-winning film editor of memorable television programmes.

She worked on the adaptation of John le Carré’s Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy (1979), Dennis Potter’s films Blackeyes (1989), Secret Friends (1991), Lipstick on Your Collar (1993), Karaoke (1996) and the four-parter Cold Lazarus (1996), directed by Renny Rye and starring Albert Finney as the writer Daniel Feeld.

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Clare Douglas obituary

My friend Clare Douglas, who has died aged 73, was a Bafta award-winning film editor of memorable television programmes.

She worked on the adaptation of John le Carré’s Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy (1979), Dennis Potter’s films Blackeyes (1989), Secret Friends (1991), Lipstick on Your Collar (1993), Karaoke (1996) and the four-parter Cold Lazarus (1996), directed by Renny Rye and starring Albert Finney as the writer Daniel Feeld.

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Michael Wearing, producer of iconic TV dramas, dies at 78

Michael Wearing, producer of iconic TV dramas, dies at 78
Wearing produced Boys from the Blackstuff, Pride and Prejudice, Edge of Darkness and many more.

Michael Wearing, producer of iconic television dramas including Boys from the Blackstuff and Edge of Darkness, has died aged 78 (reports Broadcast).

Wearing (right), who held a number of senior positions across drama at the BBC, died on Friday 5 May following a stroke. Wearing is survived by his three children, Sadie, Ella and Ben.

After studying anthropology at Newcastle University and a short career in the theatre, Wearing joined the BBC’s English regions drama department as a script editor in 1976.

Reporting to David Rose, who went on to become founder of Film 4, at the BBC’s Pebble Mill base in Birmingham, Wearing worked with writers including Alan Bleasdale and Ron Hutchinson on a number of Play for Today scripts.

He also worked on series including Stephen Davis’ Trouble With Gregory, which aired as part of BBC2’s Playhouse strand, Hutchinson’s six-part
See full article at ScreenDaily »

The Forgotten: Seth Holt's "Station Six - Sahara" (1963)

  • MUBI
Seth Holt is an odd figure. An editor at first, his career spans classic Ealing comedies (The Lavender Hill Mob, 1951) and gritty kitchen sink drama (Saturday Night and Sunday Morning, 1960), while his overlapping career as producer saw him preside over the classic The Ladykillers (1955). On becoming a director, he worked mainly at Hammer, which made radically different content from Ealing but perhaps shared the same cozy atmosphere.Taste of Fear (a.k.a. Scream of Fear, 1961) is a zestful Diabolique knock-off, while The Nanny (1965) continued Bette Davis' career in horror. It's incredibly strong, beautifully made and quite ruthless: Bette referred to Holt as "a mountain of evil" and found him the most demanding director she'd encountered since William Wyler. During the daft but enjoyably peculiar Blood from the Mummy's Tomb (1971), Holt developed a persistent case of hiccups that turned the screening of rushes into hilarious occasions. Then he dropped dead of a heart attack,
See full article at MUBI »

The Best Murder Mystery Series Ever — IndieWire Critics Survey

  • Indiewire
The Best Murder Mystery Series Ever — IndieWire Critics Survey
Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of TV critics two questions and publishes the results on Tuesday. (The answer to the second, “What is the best show currently on TV?” can be found at the end of this post.)

This week’s question: What is your favorite murder mystery show?

Erik Adams (@ErikMAdams), A.V. Club

It has to be “Twin Peaks,” right? I’m one of those annoying people who insists the show is so much more than “Who killed Laura Palmer?”, but that is our entry point to David Lynch and Mark Frost’s weird little world, and the question that briefly made “Twin Peaks” a pop-culture phenomenon. And the chapters of the series that deal with finding Laura’s murderer are some of the most compelling, from the dream-sequence enhanced “Zen, Or The Skill To Catch A Killer” or the eventual solution to the mystery, a
See full article at Indiewire »

The Best Murder Mystery Series Ever — IndieWire Critics Survey

The Best Murder Mystery Series Ever — IndieWire Critics Survey
Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of TV critics two questions and publishes the results on Tuesday. (The answer to the second, “What is the best show currently on TV?” can be found at the end of this post.)

This week’s question: What is your favorite murder mystery show?

Erik Adams (@ErikMAdams), A.V. Club

It has to be “Twin Peaks,” right? I’m one of those annoying people who insists the show is so much more than “Who killed Laura Palmer?”, but that is our entry point to David Lynch and Mark Frost’s weird little world, and the question that briefly made “Twin Peaks” a pop-culture phenomenon. And the chapters of the series that deal with finding Laura’s murderer are some of the most compelling, from the dream-sequence enhanced “Zen, Or The Skill To Catch A Killer” or the eventual solution to the mystery, a
See full article at Indiewire Television »

Women who worked on Play for Today | Letters

Deborah Orr (Why can’t TV make new plays for today?, 14 January) correctly points out that British playwrights are tackling many of the major social issues today in the theatre instead of using the more democratic medium of television. She laments the loss of Play for Today, saying it “fostered such talents as Mike Leigh, Alan Bleasdale, Dennis Potter and Jack Rosenthal (though this was the 70s, so no women.)” There was at least one – me. I wrote a play for that series which was directed by the late Alan Clarke. It was called Nina, based on the lives of two Russian dissidents, and it starred Eleanor Bron and Jack Shepherd.

Jehane Markham

London

• Over the 14 years (1970-84) that Play for Today ran, at least 21 female dramatists (including Julia Jones, Beryl Bainbridge, Caryl Churchill and Paula Milne) had plays produced for it. Play for Today also employed four female producers (Irene Shubik,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Interview: Ridley Scott & Tom Hardy take us inside the world of Taboo, their new BBC TV series

  • HeyUGuys
Author: Jon Lyus

“I feel least qualified to go and do a period drama for the BBC,” says Tom Hardy during our interview sessions early last December for his new eight part drama Taboo.

The show airs its first episode tomorrow night on BBC One and charts the return of James Delaney, described by the actor as a “perverse renaissance man”, to London from his adventures in Africa upon the death of his Father.

He is a man with guilty secrets, and one who gives no quarter to the hostility he encounters from his family and the institutions which seek to hold him to order. As viewers will see tonight the dawn of the Industrial Revolution has been recreated in all its gory, dirty glory. This is a bleak beginning to a story that has an even darker path to tread in future weeks.

We sat down with Hardy and
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Ethel & Ernest review – moving adaptation of Raymond Briggs's graphic novel

The second feature animation from the When the Wind Blows author tells the charming story of his parents’ marriage

Raymond Briggs’s graphic-novel tribute to his parents Ethel and Ernest, and their long, happy marriage has been lovingly turned into a feature animation that exactly reproduces the detail and the simplicity of his hand-drawn style. It is gentle and charming, with an unbearably moving ending, though I confess I’m not sure what to think about its essentially placid quality. Brenda Blethyn and Jim Broadbent are the voices: a little old for the characters in their 1920s youth, but perhaps people looked and behaved a bit older in those days.

Ethel was a lady’s maid, Ernest a cheeky milkman who liked the look of the new Labour party. They had just one child, Raymond, having bought a terraced south London house in 1930. (Let’s see a young couple buy the same house today.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Emma Stone, Ryan Gosling, and a Los Angeles to die for all make 'La La Land' look special

  • Hitfix
Emma Stone, Ryan Gosling, and a Los Angeles to die for all make 'La La Land' look special
Gorgeous. Damien Chazelle’s got a lot of eyes on him as he prepares his follow-up to Whiplash for release, and based on today’s first trailer for La La Land, he’s got precious little to worry about. When you cast Emma Stone and Ryan Gosling as young pretty people falling in love, you’re already halfway done with your work, but when you add in the surreal and beautiful take on Los Angeles, a city that is plenty surreal and beautiful on its own, you might end up with something really special. I started laughing today when I saw some dude on Twitter dismiss this because he thought it looked too much like Woody Allen’s Everyone Says I Love You. Hi, random dude. Please see more movies. Musicals have always been one of the most expressionistic forms of mainstream film, with song and dance standing in for
See full article at Hitfix »

A celebration of disembodied brains and heads in the movies

Ryan Lambie Jul 14, 2016

We take a look at some of the most memorable and freaky floating brains and flying heads in the history of cinema...

Nb: The following contains spoilers for The Brain From The Planet Arous and Prometheus.

For some reason we've yet to discover, cinema has, for decades, been home to all manner of sentient, disembodied heads and floating brains. Note that we’re not talking about decapitations here - though goodness knows that cinema is home to plenty of those, from Japanese samurai epics to modern slasher horrors.

No, we’re talking about movies where heads and brains remain sentient even when they’re stuffed into jars or colossal things made of stone. Sometimes used for comedic effect, at other times for shock value, they’re a surprisingly common phenomenon in the movies. Here, we celebrate a few of our absolute favourites - though you’re sure
See full article at Den of Geek »

Frank Finlay, Oscar-Nominated British Actor, Dies at 89

Frank Finlay, Oscar-Nominated British Actor, Dies at 89
British actor Frank Finlay, who was nominated for an Oscar for his work in “Othello” and starred in the “Three Musketeers” films of the ’70s, died Saturday, according to a message on his official website. He was 89.

“We are very saddened to announce that Frank died today 30 January 2016 at home surrounded by his family,” reads the statement. “He was a fine actor and will be very much missed by his friends and family.”

Finlay starred alongside Oliver Reed, Richard Chamberlain and Michael York in 1973’s “The Three Musketeers” before returning as Porthos for “The Four Musketeers: Milday’s Revenge” in 1974. He would go on to reprise his role in the 1989 film “The Return of the Musketeers.”

The actor also appeared in the Richard Roundtree sequel “Shaft in Africa.” His TV credits include starring in “Bouquet of Barbed Wire” with Susan Penhaligon and in Dennis Potter serial “Casanova.”

He scored
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Frank Finlay, Oscar-Nominated British Actor, Dies at 89

Frank Finlay, Oscar-Nominated British Actor, Dies at 89
British actor Frank Finlay, who was nominated for an Oscar for his work in “Othello” and starred in the “Three Musketeers” films of the ’70s, died Saturday, according to a message on his official website. He was 89.

“We are very saddened to announce that Frank died today 30 January 2016 at home surrounded by his family,” reads the statement. “He was a fine actor and will be very much missed by his friends and family.”

Finlay starred alongside Oliver Reed, Richard Chamberlain and Michael York in 1973’s “The Three Musketeers” before returning as Porthos for “The Four Musketeers: Milday’s Revenge” in 1974. He would go on to reprise his role in the 1989 film “The Return of the Musketeers.”

The actor also appeared in the Richard Roundtree sequel “Shaft in Africa.” His TV credits include starring in “Bouquet of Barbed Wire” with Susan Penhaligon and in Dennis Potter serial “Casanova.”

He scored
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Why TV could be perfect for Philip Pullman’s His Dark Materials

The fantasy author’s enthusiastic about his novels being adapted for the small screen. Let’s hope the producers don’t insist they have to ‘sound every note’

In the early decades of television, some of the considerable snobbery that the medium suffered came from lovers of novels: teachers and parents would exhort regular viewers to lower their eyes to a good book rather than level them at the screen. The later coinage by writers for the box in the corner such as Dennis Potter and Steve Bochco of the term “novel for TV” – to describe the multi-strand multi-episode series – was sniffed at by some practitioners of printed fiction.

These days, though, celebrated novelists seem to be competing as cheerleaders for reading’s once-disreputable rival. Endorsing the BBC’s planned adaptation of the His Dark Materials books this week, Philip Pullman – whose work has previously been adapted for cinema, theatre
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

BBC Store launch is an early Christmas present for TV viewers

The BBC’s new online content shop offers a tantalising selection of unforgettable and forgotten TV, from Dennis Potter to Muffin the Mule. Here’s my wish list

Television, at its best, is a sort of art gallery of striking images, but with the significant difference that, if you like something you see on TV it has been possible to take the pictures home – first through VHS, then DVD and now Dto, or download to own. Digital copies of BBC shows have been available for some time through iTunes and other online retailers, and now, from one minute past midnight, through BBC Store, an online content shop launched by the corporation’s commercial wing, BBC Worldwide.

Related: BBC Store offers chance to buy and download episodes of classic shows

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See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

The Long Good Friday/Mona Lisa review – captivating visions of London’s underworld

(John Mackenzie, 1980/Neil Jordan, 1986; Arrow DVD/Blu-ray, 18)

Bob Hoskins became an actor by accident when he accompanied a friend to an audition at London’s leftwing Unity theatre in 1969, and achieved TV stardom as the doomed travelling salesman in Dennis Potter’s Pennies From Heaven. In 1980, he became an international star in Scottish director John Mackenzie’s The Long Good Friday, his first major screen role, as the East End gangster Harold Shand who dreams of transforming his minor criminal empire into a legitimate enterprise by rejuvenating London’s decaying docklands and playing host to the 1988 Olympics. Hoskins’s Shand was compared favourably with Edward G Robinson’s seminal Little Caesar of 1931.

Related: Bob Hoskins: a career in pictures

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See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

‘Prime Suspect’ Creator Lynda La Plante Moves from UTA to Wme

‘Prime Suspect’ Creator Lynda La Plante Moves from UTA to Wme
Prime Suspect” creator Lynda La Plante has signed with Wme, Variety has learned. The bestselling English author and screenwriter comes from UTA.

La Plante’s move comes before the fall release of her new “Prime Suspect” prequel novel “Tennison,” which she is adapting for television.

The award-winning “Prime Suspect” TV trilogy, starring Helen Mirren, was created by La Plante, who penned the miniseries in the ’90s. The story was remade for U.S. audiences in 2011 with NBC’s drama series, starring Mario Bello, which La Plante co-created and exec produced.

“Tennison,” the first novel in a series of “Prime Suspect” prequels, will be published this September. La Plante is adapting the story for ITV, where her “Widows” and “Prime Suspect” franchises originally aired.

La Plante broke through in 1983 with her six-part British robbery miniseries “Widows,” which had a follow-up series, “Widows 2,” in 1985 and another spinoff, “She’s Out,” in 1995. The American remake,
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Den Of Geek Book Club: A Story Lately Told - Anjelica Huston

  • Den of Geek
Anjelica Huston's autobiography is a beautifully written evocation of time and place, but provides scant personal insight...

Autobiographies are a strange business. I'm never sure whether we, the readers, want to experience exactly what the writer has experienced, or if we're looking for more - a level of extrapolation, of objectivity, hoping that the writer can point out their highs and lows and say, "This is where it all went right, and this is where it didn't." Are we trying to live a little bit of a different person's life, or learn from it?

Or maybe there's a simpler option, and we just like reading about famous people. If that's the case, then Anjelica Huston's memoir, A Story Lately Told, is a very good read. Her father, the film director John Huston, gave her an childhood filled with trips abroad, movie sets, actors and writers and singers that are names we all know,
See full article at Den of Geek »
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