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Diamonds Aren't Forever: Close-Up on Sidney Lumet's "The Anderson Tapes"

  • MUBI
Close-Up is a feature that spotlights films now playing on Mubi. Sidney Lumet's The Anderson Tapes (1971) is showing December 23, 2017 - January 22, 2018 in the United Kingdom.“Say Cheese!” —Bank clerk, The Anderson Tapes “Say Cheese!” —Frank Sobotka, The WireThe first thing we see in The Anderson Tapes (1971) is a television monitor, on which jailbird John ‘Duke’ Anderson (Sean Connery), speaking to camera, reveals how he became infatuated with safecracking. He likens it to rape—then revises that analogy, saying it was more like seduction. “Often, I was sexually aroused at the time.” As he’s talking, the ‘invisible’ recording apparatus through which we’re watching the monitor pans away, and we see Duke sitting, alongside other inmates, fed up of hearing his own braggadocio. It’s his last day in the can; at the end of the film, the NYPD cops in pursuit of this recently-freed career criminal will discover
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Why Quentin Tarantino Producer Richard Gladstein Ditched Indie Film to Run the AFI Conservatory

The American Film Institute Conservatory has a new dean in producer Richard Gladstein, and he shamelessly chased down the job.

Gladstein — president of Film Colony, producer of Best Picture Oscar nominees “Finding Neverland” and “The Cider House Rules,” as well as a bevy of Quentin Tarantino movies — comes to a Los Feliz hillside campus that is still bruised after two fractious years under the last dean, Jan Schuette, who last November agreed to step down at the end of June.

No one is more surprised than Gladstein at how much he wanted the gig. He put in a long stint with Harvey Weinstein at Miramax Films, where he started as head of production in 1993. “Oddly it was the same day that Disney bought the company,” he said. “So my first-day press conference with Jeffrey Katzenberg was my initiation. The AFI feels akin to that. The place is bursting with creativity,
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Why Quentin Tarantino Producer Richard Gladstein Ditched Indie Film to Run the AFI Conservatory

The American Film Institute Conservatory has a new dean in producer Richard Gladstein, and he shamelessly chased down the job.

Gladstein — president of Film Colony, producer of Best Picture Oscar nominees “Finding Neverland” and “The Cider House Rules,” as well as a bevy of Quentin Tarantino movies — comes to a Los Feliz hillside campus that is still bruised after two fractious years under the last dean, Jan Schuette, who last November agreed to step down at the end of June.

No one is more surprised than Gladstein at how much he wanted the gig. He put in a long stint with Harvey Weinstein at Miramax Films, where he started as head of production in 1993. “Oddly it was the same day that Disney bought the company,” he said. “So my first-day press conference with Jeffrey Katzenberg was my initiation. The AFI feels akin to that. The place is bursting with creativity,
See full article at Indiewire »

Tribeca Talks – A fascinating evening with Barbra Streisand with Robert Rodriguez

  • HeyUGuys
Author: James Kleinmann

Saturday evening in New York saw the unlikely pairing of filmmaker Robert Rodriguez and the iconic Barbra Streisand take to the stage at the 16th Tribeca Film Festival for a memorable discussion as part of the Tribeca Talks series.

Rodriguez immediately addressed how the improbable duo came about, revealing that Streisand was the most adored star in his household when he was growing up. When she became the first woman to write, direct, produce and star in a major American movie with Yentil, he was inspired as a budding young filmmaker and his five sisters felt empowered.

Rodriguez shared: “It speaks volumes about the widespread appeal of Barbra Streisand. I grew up in a large Hispanic family of 10 kids in San Antonio, Texas, and in our household, there simply was no bigger star than Barbra Streisand.”

When he finally met Streisand as an adult, he says he
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Barbra Streisand Started Directing Because She “Couldn’t Be Heard”

Barbra Streisand in “The Guilt Trip”: Paramount Pictures

Barbra Streisand didn’t mince words when Robert Rodriguez interviewed her at the Tribeca Film Festival this past weekend —of course, we wouldn’t have it any other way. The famously outspoken megastar had some choice words about how women directors are treated in Hollywood and how little things have changed since she made her own directorial debut with 1983’s “Yentl,” a story about a woman (Streisand) posing as a man in order to study the Torah.

According to Variety, Streisand spoke candidly about her lack of directing Oscar nods for “Yentl” and 1991’s “Prince of Tides.” She believes sexism from both men and women stopped her from receiving recognition from the Academy. “There were a lot of older people. They don’t want to see a woman director,” she told Rodriguez. “I don’t know how many women wanted to see a woman director.”

Streisand’s lack of directing nominations does seem like a blatant snub, as both “Yentl” and the romance “Prince of Tides” racked up a bunch of other nods. “Prince of Tides” in particular was nominated for seven Oscars, including Best Picture and Best Adapted Screenplay, which often go hand-in-hand with a directing nod.

As Streisand revealed, her work on Sydney Pollack’s 1973 romantic drama “The Way We Were” was the catalyst for her directing career. She disagreed with Pollack’s vision and was “horrified” when he cut “scenes that [Streisand] felt illustrated why her on-screen relationship with Robert Redford’s character ultimately disintegrated,” Variety details. Her lack of creative control is what drove her to helm her own movies.

“I directed because I couldn’t be heard,” Streisand emphasized.

While she wouldn’t be credited as a director until 1983, Streisand first demonstrated her artistic vision on the 1976 drama “A Star Is Born.” The film, which sees Streisand as a rising music star in a doomed relationship with past-his-prime rock star Kris Kristofferson, was directed by Frank Pierson. But Streisand told Rodriguez that she had the final cut. “That was tough because I was blackmailed into hiring [Pierson],” she said, per Deadline. “I hired him to write and he said he wouldn’t do it unless he directed. I had final cut rights. I told him he could have all the credit, but that he had to allow my vision to be there. He would agree, but then I’d show up and the cameras would be in [the wrong places].”

The “Funny Girl” star also brushed off Rodriguez’s suggestion that her work as a director “shattered a glass ceiling for other female filmmakers,” Variety notes. Acknowledging how few opportunities female directors receive in Hollywood, Streisand responded, “Not enough women are directing now.” In other words, the glass ceiling might have a crack or two, but it’s still very much intact.

Among Streisand’s other directing credits are the 1996 feature “The Mirror Has Two Faces” and three documentaries of her concert performances. She is also set to direct an untitled film about the affair between photographer Margaret Bourke-White and author Erskine Caldwell. She has received two Oscars: one for her performance in “Funny Girl” and another for Best Original Song for “A Star Is Born.”

Fittingly, Streisand was the person who presented Kathryn Bigelow the Oscar for Best Director in 2010 for “The Hurt Locker.” After opening the envelope with the winner’s name, Streisand said, “Well, the time has come,” in reference to the fact that a woman had never received the award before. To date, Bigelow remains the only woman to have won the Academy Award for Best Director.

Streisand was last seen in Anne Fletcher’s 2012 mother-son comedy “The Guilt Trip.”

Barbra Streisand Started Directing Because She “Couldn’t Be Heard” was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

‘A Star Is Born’: Andrew Dice Clay Tapped to Appear as Lady Gaga’s Dad in Bradley Cooper’s Remake

‘A Star Is Born’: Andrew Dice Clay Tapped to Appear as Lady Gaga’s Dad in Bradley Cooper’s Remake
Andrew Dice Clay is in talks to join the cast of “A Star Is Born,” which marks Bradley Cooper’s directorial debut. According to Deadline, the comedian will play Lady Gaga’s “very Italian” father in the Warner Bros. remake of William A. Wellman’s 1937 movie.

Read More: ‘Orphan Black’ Cast and Crew Share 14 Secrets of the Sestrahood — PaleyFest 2017

The film follows an aspiring singer/actress (Gaga) who falls in love with an aging alcoholic movie star (Cooper). He helps launch her career as he sees his own fade away.

This is the third remake of Wellman’s original film, which starred Federic March and Janet Gaynor. A second version was made in 1954, directed by George Cukor and starring Judy Garland and James Mason. In 1976, Barbra Streisand co-starred alongside Kris Kristofferson in a third remake, helmed by Frank Pierson.

Read More: ‘The Hero’ Review: Sam Elliott Carries Brett Haley’s
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Spotlight’ Oscar Winner Tom McCarthy Honored by San Francisco Film Festival

‘Spotlight’ Oscar Winner Tom McCarthy Honored by San Francisco Film Festival
The San Francisco Film Society has selected “Spotlight” writer-director Tom McCarthy as the recipient of the 2016 Kanbar Award for excellence in storytelling.

The tribute, to be presented during the San Francisco Film Festival’s awards night on April 25, will acknowledge McCarthy’s “exceptional mastery” of character-driven plots that bring audiences along on the psychological journeys of his heroes and antiheroes.

He will also be honored at “An Evening With Tom McCarthy” on April 26 at Bampfa in Berkeley. An onstage interview and a selection of clips from his screenwriting and directing career will be followed by a screening of 2003’s “The Station Agent.”

“‘Spotlight’ won Best Picture at the Academy Awards this past year for many reasons, but its precise script, filled with perfectly conceived characters, inarguably set the tone and provided the heart and soul of the film,” said Noah Cowan, executive director of the San Francisco Film Society.

Spotlight
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Movie News: 'Dog Day Afternoon' Heads to Broadway; Watch Jason Sudeikis in First 'Tumbledown' Trailer

Dog Day Afternoon: Forty years after its release, Dog Day Afternoon is heading to Broadway. Based on a real-life account of a bank robbery gone wrong and the ensuing hostage drama on a hot summer's day, the 1975 movie starred Al Pacino and John Cazale; it earned writer Frank Pierson an Academy Award. The stage version will be written by Stephen Adly Guirgis, who won a Pulitzer Prize for his play Between Riverside and Crazy. [Deadline]   Jaws: The last remaining shark from Steven Spielberg's Jaws is heading to a museum in Los Angeles. Four models were originally made for the movie, but three were made with latex that deteriorated over the years. The fourth model, made with fiberglass, has been donated to the Academy Museum, which will house the collection of the...

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See full article at Movies.com »

News Briefs: 'Dog Day Afternoon' Heads to Broadway; Watch First 'Tumbledown' Trailer

  • Fandango
Dog Day Afternoon: Forty years after its release, Dog Day Afternoon is heading to Broadway. Based on a real-life account of a bank robbery gone wrong and the ensuing hostage drama on a hot summer's day, the 1975 movie starred Al Pacino and John Cazale; it earned writer Frank Pierson an Academy Award. The stage version will be written by Stephen Adly Guirgis, who won a Pulitzer Prize for his play Between Riverside and Crazy. [Deadline]   Jaws: The last remaining shark from...

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Warner Bros. Will Bring ‘Dog Day Afternoon’ To Broadway, Kicking Live Production Up A Notch

Warner Bros. Theatre Ventures, the film studio’s live stage play division, has commissioned Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Stephen Adly Guirgis (Between Riverside And Crazy, The Motherf**ker With The Hat) to adapt Sidney Lumet’s 1975 film starring Al Pacino and John Cazale as friends and famously inept bank robbers seeking money to finance a sex-change operation. Frank Pierson, who died in 2012, wrote the Oscar-winning screenplay, based on a true story. Guirgis is an…
See full article at Deadline »

"Dog Day Afternoon" Comes To The Stage

Are you ready for the Attica kick line?

Warner Bros. Theatre Ventures has commissioned Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright and "The Get Down" executive producer Stephen Adly Guirgis ("Between Riverside And Crazy") to adapt Sidney Lumet's classic 1975 film "Dog Day Afternoon" into a live stage play.

Al Pacino and John Cazale starred in the original as friends and inept bank robbers seeking money to finance a sex-change operation. Frank Pierson penned the script.

Warner Bros. Theatre Ventures has been behind adaptations of "Misery," "The Bridges Of Madison County" and "The Curious Incident Of The Dog In The Night-Time" for the stage. They have a version of "Charlie And The Chocolate Factory" in the works for a 2017 Broadway bow.

Source: Deadline
See full article at Dark Horizons »

‘Meet the Raisins’ Writer Arthur Sellers Honored by Writers Guild

Comedy-variety television veteran and screenwriter Arthur Sellers has been named the recipient of the Writers Guild of America West’s Morgan Cox Award in recognition of his guild service.

Sellers will be honored at the Writers Guild Awards West Coast ceremony on Feb. 13 at the Hyatt Regency Century Plaza in Los Angeles.

He earned an Emmy nomination for his work on the 1988 animated TV special “Meet the Raisins!” Sellers’ screenwriting credits include “Modern Problems” and the 1999 action-thriller “The Vivero Letter.”

“Arthur has given countless hours of time, sat in more meetings than anyone can count, in service of improving not his own lot, but the lot of all of us – and he’s done it with intelligence, with wit, with unceasing good cheer,” said WGA West president Howard A. Rodman. “He’s a living embodiment of generosity of spirit.”

In addition to serving on the WGA West’s board from
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Giveaway – Win Dog Day Afternoon on Blu-ray

On September 7th 2015, Warner Bros. Home Entertainment (Wbhe) will celebrate director Sidney Lumet’s Dog Day Afternoon, the explosive drama starring Al Pacino, with a new 40th Anniversary edition Blu-ray available for the first time in the UK. To celebrate, we are giving away a copy!

This unique thriller, filled with sardonic comedy and based on a real-life incident, earned six Academy Award® nominations (including Best Picture) and won an Oscar® for Frank Pierson’s streetwise screenplay. John Cazale, Charles Durning (Golden Globe®-nominated for their roles) and James Broderick co-star.

Pacino and Lumet (collaborators on Serpico) reteam for the drama which currently has a 97% Fresh Rotten Tomatoes® Score. Pacino plays mastermind Sonny and John Cazale is his partner Sal – two optimistic nobodies who set out to rob a bank, and unexpectedly create a media circus and a complete disaster.

“A tense classic!” ✮✮✮✮✮ Empire

You can order Dog Day Afternoon via Amazon here.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Austin Film Festival to Honor ‘L.A. Confidential’ Screenwriter Brian Helgeland

Austin Film Festival to Honor ‘L.A. Confidential’ Screenwriter Brian Helgeland
The Austin Film Festival has selected Brian Helgeland as recipient of its Distinguished Screenwriter Award, to be presented Oct. 31.

Helgeland won the Oscar for best adapted screenplay for “L.A. Confidential” and was nominated for “Mystic River.” He directed and wrote “Legend,” “42,” “A Knight’s Tale” and “Payback” and wrote “Man on Fire,” “The Taking of Pelham 123,” “Conspiracy Theory,” “Green Zone” and “Blood Work.”

Helgeland has also won awards from the Writers Guild of America, as well as the Pen Center Literary Award, the Edgar Allan Poe Award and the USC Scripter Award. Universal launches “Legend,” starring Tom Hardy, on Oct. 2.

Previous Distinguished Screenwriter Award recipients include James L. Brooks, Lawrence Kasdan, Callie Khouri, Frank Pierson, Harold Ramis, Caroline Thompson and Steven Zaillian.

The festival, which launches Oct. 29, will also present a reading of Norman Lear’s un-produced teleplay “Guess Who Died?” The writing team, Scott Neustadter and Michael H. Weber,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Rare Silent Film Actor Who Had Long Talkie Career Is TCM's Star of the Day

Adolphe Menjou movies today (This article is currently being revised.) Despite countless stories to the contrary, numerous silent film performers managed to survive the coming of sound. Adolphe Menjou, however, is a special case in that he not only remained a leading man in the early sound era, but smoothly made the transition to top supporting player in mid-decade, a position he would continue to hold for the quarter of a century. Menjou is Turner Classic Movies' Star of the Day today, Aug. 3, as part of TCM's "Summer Under the Stars" 2015 series. Right now, TCM is showing William A. Wellman's A Star Is Born, the "original" version of the story about a small-town girl (Janet Gaynor) who becomes a Hollywood star, while her husband (Fredric March) boozes his way into oblivion. In typical Hollywood originality (not that things are any different elsewhere), this 1937 version of the story – produced by
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King of the Gypsies | Blu-ray Review

A forgotten gem of the late 1970s comes to Blu-ray for the first time, Frank Pierson’s adaptation of the novel King of the Gypsies. Notable for several reasons, namely as the credited debut for actor Eric Roberts and a star studded cast packed to distraction, this is the kind of pulp oddity often whisked off the shelves of the bestseller list for glossy cinematic reinterpretation. This gypsy saga was based on a novel by Peter Maas, better known as the biographer of Serpico, which resulted in the novel inspiring Sidney Lumet’s classic 1973 film starring Al Pacino. Eventually, Maas’ works, often revolving around sensational true crime treatments, would be adapted mainly for television (including the 1991 Valerie Bertinelli Lifetime film, In a Child’s Name), and this sometimes outlandish antique feels like an exaggerated heirloom in the Harold Robbins’ vein (The Carpetbaggers; The Betsy; The Adventurers), a frumpy comparison
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

A Brief (Pun Intended) History Of Lawyers In The Movies Part II

Lawyers in motion pictures have been portrayed as one of two extremes, devils or angels, almost since celluloid was invented. The first film dealing specifically with a law firm and attorneys, 1933’s Counsellor at Law, starring John Barrymore, portrayed its J.D.s as upstanding citizens, as did the early Perry Mason films of the same period. This quickly changed, however, with many attorneys portrayed as being capable of the same brand of skullduggery as their shifty clients. With that in mind, we bring you a list of the good, the bad and the ugly of lawyers in movies. Enjoy, and please refrain from suing us if you feel otherwise...

1. Devil’s Advocate (1997)

Keanu Reeves plays Kevin Lomax, a hot-shot young Florida lawyer who is all about climbing the ladder. When he gets an offer he can’t refuse from a high-powered New York firm, led by the legendary John Milton
See full article at The Hollywood Interview »

Remembering Sidney Lumet

April 9th will mark the four year anniversary of director Sidney Lumet's passing, at age 86. Lumet was the first director I interviewed whose one-sheet posters hung on my wall as a kid. He was an idol, an icon, and an inspiration. I wasn't yet 30 in April 1997, when I met him at The Four Seasons Hotel in Beverly Hills for our interview at the press junket for "Night Falls On Manhattan," one of his solid, authentic urban dramas that blended crime, politics and personal revelations that became his signature.

Lumet immediately put any butterflies I had at ease. Diminutive, but with the infectious energy of a teenager, his was a disarming presence. He paid me a compliment on my sportcoat, saying that I looked a bit like the young Mickey Rourke (which I still don't see, but what the hell), then went on to regale me for an hour with
See full article at The Hollywood Interview »

Bradley Cooper May Direct Beyonce in 'A Star Is Born'

Bradley Cooper May Direct Beyonce in 'A Star Is Born'
Bradley Cooper is in talks to make his directorial debut with the long-planned A Star Is Born remake for Warner Bros. The film originally had Beyonc&#233 Knowles attached to star, with Clint Eastwood directing. Though Clint Eastwood is no longer involved with the project, the hope is that Beyonc&#233 Knowles will return, and Bradley Cooper will co-star alongside her.

Beyonc&#233 Knowles is wanted to take the lead as a young woman whose dreams of stardom are helped along by a former Hollywood icon (Bradley Cooper) whose better days are behind him. Bradley Cooper was originally interested in the role when Clint Eastwood was attached to the project. The actor is set to take a pass at the screenplay with writer Will Fetters, who penned the most recent draft. He will dive into the project whole heartedly once he wraps his Broadway role in The Elephant Man, which he is currently performing in London.
See full article at MovieWeb »

Bradley Cooper in Talks to Direct and Star in 'A Star is Born' Remake

Before Beyonce got pregnant she was going to star in a remake of A Star is Born for Clint Eastwood. When the project was delayed as a result of Beyonce's pregnancy, Eastwood went on to make Jersey Boys and American Sniper, but now the film is bubbling back to the surface, though Eastwood isn't the one Warner Bros. is looking at to direct, no, it's his American Sniper star Bradley Cooper. Deadline reports Warner Bros. is in negotiations with Cooper to make his directorial debut on the remake with hopes for him to also star in the film. After that, the goal is to hopefully re-approach Beyonce to take on the role of the starry-eyed girl dreaming of being a star only to have to scrape out a living as a waitress until she finds a helping hand from a alcoholic movie idol. The screenplay was written by Will Fetters
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »
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