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House, Legend Of The Mountain, Barefoot Contessa and More Join Eureka in Feb/March

Eureka! Entertainment has been dropping hints about the rest of its Q1 2018 slate for a while now, but today the British label confirmed the street dates for a host of exciting new releases for their beloved Masters of Cinema series as well as the newly launched Montage Pictures, focusing on contemporary world cinema. On 12 February, two Masters of Cinema titles previously only available on DVD, get a long-awaited Blu-ray upgrade. Nobuhiko Obayashi’s life-altering horror phantasmagoria House finally gets the Blu-ray treatment. As good a candidate as any for the ultimate batshit crazy Japanese movie experience, House has to be seen to be believed. On the same day comes the world premiere Blu-ray release of a new 2K restoration of Carl Theodor Dreyer’s Michael. It...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
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Exprmntl 3: 1963 Recap

1963 was a pivotal year in the history of avant-garde film in the United States. In Visionary Film, P. Adams Sitney calls it “the high point of the mythopoeic development within the American avant-garde.” He explains:

[Stan] Brakhage had finished and was exhibiting the first two sections of Dog Star Man by then; Jack Smith was still exhibiting the year-old Flaming Creatures; [Kenneth Anger‘s] Scorpio Rising appeared almost simultaneously with [Gregory Markopoulos‘s] Twice a Man. The shift from an interest in dreams and the erotic quest for the self to mythopoeia, and a wider interest in the collective unconscious occurred in the films of a number of major and independent artists.

(An inclusive list of American avant-garde films made/released in 1963 can be found here.)

On Christmas Day of 1963 began the weeklong third edition of Exprmntl, a competition of worldwide avant-garde films held in Knokke-le-Zoute, Belgium. The two previous Exprmntl competitions took place in 1949 and 1958. Exprmntl
See full article at Underground Film Journal »

Obayashi’s “House” is a Stylistic Masterpiece

Nobuhiko Obayashi’s classic 1977 film, “House,” which is also known as “Hausu,” is a creative and dreamy psychedelic experience that has to be seen to be believed. What was supposed to be Japanese company, Toho’s answer to Spielberg’s “Jaws” became something entirely different. Sprouting from the imagination of Obayashi’s daughter, the film transformed into a bizarre creation truly of its own with use of a unique blend of practical and special effects, varied editing techniques, and beautiful set pieces. Originally panned by critics when it first got released in Japan for it’s absurdity, it has since gone on to become a cult classic among fans of Asian cinema all around the world, as well as many film critics today.

Enter the world of Obayashi.

The story of “House” begins with a high school student named, Gorgeous, who is excited for summer vacation, which she has plans to spend with her father.
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

Contest: Chicago, freak out with free midnight movies at the Music Box this weekend

1977’s House is a classic of what writer Chuck Stevens calls “le cinéma du Wtf?!,” and it’s one of our favorites of the genre here at The A.V. Club. (We even inducted it into the New Cult Canon a few years back.) Written by director Nobuhiko Obayashi based on one of his young daughter’s nightmares, House is like an episode of Scooby-Doo directed by Richard Lester while he was utterly zonked out on psychedelics. Or maybe it’s like a ghost story told around the campfire by a precocious preteen who’s also out of her mind on psychedelics. You know what, maybe just watch the trailer:

Trust us, it’s utterly delightful, and it’s playing at the Music Box Theatre this Friday and Saturday at midnight screenings hosted by our friends at The Front Row. (You may remember them from the screenings of Boarding ...
See full article at The AV Club »

The 10 Most Beloved Movies In The Criterion Collection — IndieWire Readers Survey

The 10 Most Beloved Movies In The Criterion Collection — IndieWire Readers Survey
Editor’s Note: This article is presented in partnership with FilmStruck. Developed and managed by Turner Classic Movies (TCM) in collaboration with the Criterion Collection, FilmStruck features the largest streaming library of contemporary and classic arthouse, indie, foreign and cult films as well as extensive bonus content, filmmaker interviews and rare footage. Learn more here.

Last week, IndieWire asked our readers to name their favorite movies in the Criterion Collection, which resulted in hundreds of responses that pretty much covered every nook and cranny of Criterion’s massive library. It was great to see many readers listing dramas as diverse and polarizing as Robert Altman’s “3 Women,” George Sluizer’s “The Vanishing” and Fritz Lang’s “M,” but at the end of the day, our survey revealed which 10 titles our Criterion subscribers can’t get enough of.

An intriguing mix of reliable film landmarks and a few surprises, below is
See full article at Indiewire »

Akira Kurosawa’s Dreams

If anybody’s dreams are interesting, Akira Kurosawa’s should be, and this late career fantasy is a consistently rewarding string of morality tales and visual essays that pop off the screen. Some of the imagery has input from the famed Ishiro Honda.

Akira Kurosawa’s Dreams

Blu-ray

The Criterion Collection 842

1990 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 120 min. / available through The Criterion Collection / Street Date November 15, 2016 / 39.95

Starring Mieko Harada, Mitsunori Isaki, Toshihiko Nakano, Yoshitaka Zushi, Hisashi Igawa, Chosuke, Chishu Ryu, Martin Scorsese, Masayuki Yui.

Cinematography Takao Saito, Shoji Ueda

Film Editor Tome Minami

Original Music Sinichiro Ikebe

Creative Consultant ishiro Honda

Visual Effects Supervisors Ken Ralston, Mark Sullivan

Produced by Hisao Kurosawa, Mike Y. Inoue

Written and Directed by Akira Kurosawa

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

At the twilight of his career, after some episodes of career frustration and instability, Akira Kurosawa hit a high note with the epic costume dramas Kagemusha and Ran.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Your Name review – a beautiful out-of-body experience

With this dazzling body-swap romance, Makoto Shinkai confirms his reputation as Japan’s new animation king

“I feel like I’m always searching for someone…” Ever since the animation legend Hayao Miyazaki announced (perhaps prematurely) that 2013’s The Wind Rises was to be his final feature, fans have been searching for a successor to his artistic throne. Last week, Miyazaki revealed that 2019 may in fact see the completion of a full-length version of his short-film project, Boro the Caterpillar. But in the interim, an heir apparent has emerged in the shape of Makoto Shinkai, whose breathtaking body-swap romance Your Name has dominated the Japanese box office for months.

Revisiting themes of longing and separation that became his signature in films such as 5 Centimeters Per Second (2007) and The Garden of Words (2013), Shinkai’s fifth feature has confirmed the writer-director as a major talent, duly dubbed “the new Miyazaki”. Yet this rip-roaring,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Criterion Close-Up – Episode 54 – Hausu Party

We let our hair down for Halloween and celebrate the oddity that is Ôbayashi’s House (1977). Dave and Jessica join Mark and Aaron. We agree that House is the most random and the most bonkers “horror” film in existence. Rather than break it down thematically, we celebrate its weirdness by pointing out the Wtf moments and the occasions that make us laugh. Warning: this episode has a lot of profanity.

About the film:

How to describe Nobuhiko Obayashi’s indescribable 1977 movie House (Hausu)? As a psychedelic ghost tale? A stream-of-consciousness bedtime story? An episode of Scooby-Doo as directed by Mario Bava? Any of the above will do for this hallucinatory head trip about a schoolgirl who travels with six classmates to her ailing aunt’s creaky country home and comes 5face-to-face with evil spirits, a demonic house cat, a bloodthirsty piano, and other ghoulish visions, all realized by Obayashi via mattes,
See full article at CriterionCast »

Paul Thomas Anderson Brings ‘Punch-Drunk Love’ to The Criterion Collection This November

Paul Thomas Anderson Brings ‘Punch-Drunk Love’ to The Criterion Collection This November
November tends to be the biggest month of the year for the Criterion Collection, the boutique home video company releasing some of their most exciting releases in time for the holiday shopping season. And, lucky for us, that trend continues in 2016, as Criterion has just revealed this year’s batch of November titles, and the slate includes some absolutely major must-owns. From Paul Thomas Anderson finally joining the Collection (and bringing Adam Sandler along with him!) to a series of samurai films that have never gotten their proper due, these are movies that are worth stampeding for on Black Friday.

Check out Criterion’s full November 2016 slate below, listed in rough order of our excitement for each title. And be sure to visit Criterion’s website for full release info.

1. “Punch-Drunk Love” (dir. Paul Thomas Anderson, 2002). #843

It was only a matter of time before Paul Thomas Anderson finally joined the Criterion Collection,
See full article at Indiewire »

Cinema Gadfly – Episode 24 – The Happiness of the Katakuris

My guest for this month is Christa Mrgan, and she’s joined me to discuss the film she chose for me, the 2001 surreal horror-comedy film The Happiness of the Katakuris. You can follow the show on Twitter @cinemagadfly.

Show notes:

Takashi Miike has made an astonishing 90 films in his career, but none quite like this one Thematically it would be hard to have two films as different as this one and our last episode on Ozu’s An Autumn Afternoon Arcadia, California was home to at least one video store, in 2004 It really is quite hilarious that both An Autumn Afternoon and this were released by Shochiku, how the world changes Shochiku were, of course, also the sometime home to films by Nagisa Oshima, and Mikio Naruse As well as the phenomenally goofy films of their horror period, so brilliantly captures by Criterion in the When Horror Came to Shochiku
See full article at CriterionCast »

Best Shot: "One From the Heart"

This week's Hit Me With Your Best Shot was derailed by a very tough communal week and also a busy one for entirely different reasons for yours truly. But a few of our regular participants soldiered on. Please read their lovely pieces on this underappreciated Francis Ford Copoola curiousity from the early 80s. I think you can see a bit of it in the DNA of Moulin Rouge! if you need extra incentive to watch it on Amazon Prime.

Antagony & Ecstasy chose...

The film that was meant to be a quick cheapie designed to provide a financial shot in the arm to the fledgling American Zoetrope, but instead almost destroyed the company that Coppola had dreamed up as a sort of director-driven filmmaker's commune. It's one of the most idiosyncratic films of its era, overwhelmingly pleasurable despite being entirely unlikable and toxic in every possible way. I have no idea
See full article at FilmExperience »

Korean films win at Italy’s Far East Film Festival

A Melody To Remember won the festival’s top prize, which is voted for by audience members.

Italy’s Udine Far East Film Festival (Feff), one of Europe’s primary events focused on Asian cinema, has revealed the winners for its 18th edition.

Lee Han’s war-drama A Melody To Remember won the top prize, the Golden Mulberry, which is voted for by the festival’s attendees.

Second place also went to South Korea, for Lee Ho-Jae’s sci-fi fable Sori: Voice From The Heart.

Taking the bronze medal was Hokita Shuichi’s Japanese comedy Mohican Comes Home, which also won the Black Dragon prize voted for by ‘special pass holders’.

Honorary Golden Mulberry awards were presented to Japanese director Nobuhiko Obayashi – four of whose films were screened in the festival as a retrospective – and Sammo Hung, whose latest feature The Bodyguard closed the event this year.

The festival boasted 60,000 spectators this year and grossed €120,000, including
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Korean films triumph at Italy’s Far East Film Festival

A Melody To Remember won the festival’s top prize, which is voted for by audience members.

Italy’s Udine Far East Film Festival (Feff), one of Europe’s primary events focused on Asian cinema, has revealed the winners for its 18th edition.

Lee Han’s war-drama A Melody To Remember won the top prize, the Golden Mulberry, which is voted for by the festival’s attendees.

Second place also went to South Korea, for Lee Ho-Jae’s sci-fi fable Sori: Voice From The Heart.

Taking the bronze medal was Hokita Shuichi’s Japanese comedy Mohican Comes Home, which also won the Black Dragon prize voted for by ‘special pass holders’.

Honorary Golden Mulberry awards were presented to Japanese director Nobuhiko Obayashi – four of whose films were screened in the festival as a retrospective – and Sammo Hung, whose latest feature The Bodyguard closed the event this year.

The festival boasted 60,000 spectators this year and grossed €120,000, including
See full article at ScreenDaily »

‘A Melody to Remember’ Wins Audience Award at Udine

‘A Melody to Remember’ Wins Audience Award at Udine
Lee Han’s “A Melody to Remember” scooped the audience award at the 18th edition of the Far East Film Festival, which unspooled April 22-30 in Udine, Italy.

The drama about a Korean War veteran who organizes a choir at an orphanage after returning from the front was an international premiere at the festival following its January 2016 release in Korea by Next Entertainment World.

Shuichi Okita’s quirky comedy “Mohican Comes Home” was given the ‘Black Dragon Audience Award,’ voted on by special pass holders, as well the third place audience award. Both director Okita and star Ryuhei Matsuda were on hand to accept the prizes.

The second place audience award went to Lee Ho-Jae’s drama “Sori: Voice from the Heart,” which was also the closing film. The Mymovies Award, selected by Internet voters, was given to Hitoshi One’s manga world comedy “Bakuman.”

‘Golden Mulberry Awards’ for
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Criterion Picks on Fandor: Cats!

Each week, the fine folks at Fandor add a number of films to their Criterion Picks area, which will then be available to subscribers for the following twelve days. This week, the Criterion Picks focus on eight films featuring cats!

Need we say more? Meet the furry feline familiars that have graced some of the world’s greatest movies with their mercurial and mesmerizing presence.

Don’t have a Fandor subscription? They offer a free trial membership.

L’Atalante, the French Classic Drama by Jean Vigo

In Jean Vigo’s hands, an unassuming tale of conjugal love becomes an achingly romantic reverie of desire and hope.

Cléo from 5 to 7, the French Drama by Agnès Varda

Agnès Varda eloquently captures Paris in the sixties with this real-time portrait of a singer set adrift in the city as she awaits test results of a biopsy.

Grey Gardens, the Documentary by Ellen Hovde,
See full article at CriterionCast »

Hausu

Nobuhiko Obayashi’s 1977 film flew under the radar for years until the recent interest in Japanese horror films shined a light on its peculiar charms. Best viewed as The Haunting meets Hellzapoppin’, Hausu, at its gonzo best, works as a reminder of the staid and conservative state of current American horror films. The film, while a sizable hit in its homeland, never received a stateside release until its appearance on a must-have Criterion Blu-ray edition.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

"Nobuhiko Obayashi: A Retrospective": 5 Highlights From a Fantastic Oeuvre

"Nobuhiko Obayashi: A Retrospective," screening at Japan Society through December 5, offers a long-overdue (re)introduction to a fascinating and innovative filmmaker, one of the few of his generation still active. He's best known for his 1977 cult classic House, but beyond that is a vast and varied filmography that's still ripe for rediscovery. Below are five highlights from a career that's all about reinvention, both in personal terms and in terms of the film medium itself. For more info on these and other films, and to purchase tickets, visit Japan Society's website....

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Daily | “Nobuhiko Obayashi: A Retrospective”

Opening with the debut feature House (1977), Nobuhiko Obayashi: A Retrospective, running from today through December 6 at New York's Japan Society, is a selection of ten features and a short. Aaron Cutler for Brooklyn Magazine: "Diverse films such as his Yasujiro Ozu homage Bound for the Fields, the Mountains and the Seacoast (1986), his teen rock musical The Rocking Horsemen (1992), his recounting of a long-concluded love affair called Haruka, Nostalgia (1993, and his recent, flashback-drenched family saga Seven Weeks (2014) all take a person’s desire to return to a lost home as their central theme. These films and others by Obayashi call attention to cinema as a kind of home unto itself." » - David Hudson
See full article at Keyframe »

The Best Japanese Filmmaker You've Never Heard Of

Read More: Why the Japanese Film Industry is Hopeful For the Future A piano comes to life and hungrily devours the young girl playing it. A watermelon transforms into a severed head, which then vomits blood and bites a schoolgirl on her butt. Blood-spewing paintings, dancing skeletons and a demonic white cat: these fever dream images will be familiar to anyone who's experienced the phantasmagoric, hilarious waking nightmare that is Nobuhiko Obayashi's 1977 Japanese horror movie "House." First unleashed upon the English-speaking world by The Criterion Collection in the late 2000's, it's become a true cult item in subsequent years, but surprisingly little else from the director's vast filmography has been given any exposure overseas, despite his status in Japan as one of the few filmmakers from the sixties still turning out movies. That oversight is finally corrected with "Nobuhiko Obayashi: A Retrospective," a 10-film series running from November 20 - December.
See full article at Indiewire »

The Forgotten: Nobuhiko Obayashi's "Emotion" (1967)

  • MUBI
It's reassuring to learn that the gulf between east and west isn't as great as we might assume: it turns out that, in the sixties, just as they did in Europe and America, people in Japan got about mainly by means of jump-cuts.Nobuhiko Obayashi is best known for Hausu (a.k.a. House, 1977), a dayglo, balls-out insane horror movie that plays like a cross between The Evil Dead, a lunatic's idea of Douglas Sirk, and a girl's comic, all fed through a mincer and laced with psilocybin. The prolific filmmaker (still going strong today) actually began in the sixties with TV commercials and experimental films, of which the forty-minute oddity Emotion is one.The movie, a collage of camera effects, stills, pixillation and every other trick the decade had to offer, opens with a dedication to Roger Vadim's Blood and Roses, but though the film does feature lesbianism and vampirism,
See full article at MUBI »
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