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David Fincher’s ‘Gone Girl’ Has 2,400 Shots, And Now You Can Study Every Single One

David Fincher’s ‘Gone Girl’ Has 2,400 Shots, And Now You Can Study Every Single One
One of the best ways to learn about any given filmmaker is to study his or her shot list. Just last month, an invaluable video essay broke down all 678 shots in Paul Thomas Anderson’s “There Will Be Blood” to explore how the filmmaker uses shot lengths and edits to create a particular tone for the viewer that matches the character’s experience. If Anderson loves letting the camera linger, then consider David Fincher his polar opposite.

Read More:‘There Will Be Blood’: What You Learn About Paul Thomas Anderson By Counting All 678 Shots

Film editor Vashi Nedomansky, who worked on Fincher’s “Gone Girl,” has created amazing new graphics (via No Film School) that take a birds eye view at all of the shots in both “The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo” and “Gone Girl.”

Just to provide some perspective: There are 678 shots in “There Will Be Blood,
See full article at Indiewire »

Watch All the Missing Scenes from Rogue One

Watch All the Missing Scenes from Rogue One
Now that Rogue One: A Star Wars Story is finally here, and another box office hit for Disney and LucasFilm, fans have already started analyzing every bit of footage they can. We have already offered deep dives on the cameos and Easter Eggs, along with a report that the movie contains unused footage from A New Hope, from nearly 40 years ago. Today we have an intriguing new video from an obsessive editor who went ahead and cut a reel together of the 46 shots from the trailers and other footage, that wasn't used in the theatrical cut.

Editor, Vashi Nedomansky posted this new video on his website Vashi Visuals, which spans just over two minutes and actually serves as a great trailer on its own, albeit one comprised of footage completely excluded from the film itself. Vashi Nedomsky mentions the rumors that approximately 40% of the film was re-shot, which could
See full article at MovieWeb »

Watch: ‘The Shining: Forwards and Backwards’ Provides a New Way to See Stanley Kubrick’s Horror Masterpiece

Over five years ago, on Wednesday, March 9th, 2011, John Fell Ryan and Akiva Saunders premiered their experiment The Shining: Forwards and Backwards. At the Williamsburg, Brooklyn locale The Spectacle Theater they screened Stanley Kubrick’s horror masterpiece from start to finish and vice versa simultaneously and superimposed on one another. Perhaps to the surprise of some, the results were fascinating enough to lead to many more screenings, including one at Fantastic Fest in 2012, as well as being featured in Rodney Ascher‘s Room 237.

The various oddities and strange occurrences that crop up when playing the film this way have been exhaustively explored by its own the creator (see here and beyond), and if you haven’t yet seen it this way, today is your chance. Editor Vashi Nedomansky made his own version and while we can’t imagine it’ll survive online for too long due to copyright issues,
See full article at The Film Stage »

Los Angeles’ ‘6th Street’ Bridge Gets A Movie Tribute

6th Street bridge movie tribute: Film fan constructs edit of movies featuring the Los Angeles landmark.

A film fan has created a 6th Street bridge movie tribute. A what? Well, the 6th Street bridge in Los Angeles is not necessarily a landmark that one would instantly recognise, but you’d be surprised just how many films the 80-year-old viaduct has featured in. There are literally hundreds. Well, the bridge is now closed (as of January 29th), and will be pulled down later this year and rebuild ready for a 2019 opening.

Vashi Nedomansky, an avid, prolific filmmaker/ editor over on Vimeo has constructed the 6th Street bridge movie tribute which features 11 of the many films that the bridge has featured in over the years since its construction in 1932. Amongst them are The Mask, Drive, Terminator 2, Point Blank (1967), The Dark Knight Rises and To Live And Die In L.A.

Omitted from the video,
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Watch: Take An 8-Minute Journey With Use Of Dolly Zoom Through Film History

Here’s a bit of movie trivia you might not know. “The Dolly zoom… was invented by cameraman Irmin Roberts to visually convey the feeling of agoraphobia by zooming in with the lens while simultaneously dollying backwards the entire camera... or vice versa.” So prefaces editor and film enthusiast Vashi Nedomansky in his eight and a half minute long supercut, “Evolution of the Dolly Zoom.” In the video, Nedomansky strings together nearly two-dozen examples of the camera technique from classic films, beginning with its famous debut in Alfred Hitchcock’s “Vertigo,” on which Irmin Roberts worked. You can see how effective the technique was at creating a sense of, well, vertigo, as retired detective John 'Scottie' Ferguson (James Stewart) chases Madeleine (Kim Novak) up a bell tower. He suffers from an acute fear of heights, which inhibits his ability to follow her. Roberts’ technique is absolutely perfect in its attempt
See full article at The Playlist »

Watch: Crosshair Framing in Mad Max: Fury Road

Sometimes it’s good to state the seemingly obvious, so Vashi Nedomansky has performed a public service in assembling this brief video showing how centered and symmetrical framing helps guide viewers’ eyes through the many cuts of Mad Max: Fury Road. Audio of John Seale discussing director George Miller’s constant instructions as to where to keep the camera’s crosshairs in each shot clarifies the point being made visually. Read more at Nedomansky’s site; thanks to The Playlist for the heads-up.
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

Watch: Storyboard To Film Comparison For John Carpenter's 'The Thing'

When John Carpenter’s remake of “The Thing” was released 32 years ago, critics were mixed on the horror film – Roger Ebert gave it 2 1/2 stars – and North American audiences, still head over heels in love with Steven Spielberg’s tale of a nicer alien visitor – “E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial” – largely ignored Carpenter’s film. Thankfully, time has been kind to “The Thing” and it’s now rightfully regarded as a horror classic which has inspired Vashi Nedomansky to create a video showcasing the origins of the frightening images in the film. Lasting nearly five minutes long, the video is a side-by-side comparison of artist Michael Plogg’s storyboards and the final film. Two sequences are singled out for comparison, the crew’s discovery of the alien spacecraft in the ice and the iconic defibrillation scene. There’s few extra beats in the final version of the latter sequence, but the storyboards and film are still virtually identical.
See full article at The Playlist »

The Cinematography of 'The Ipcress File' and The 'Frame Within the Frame'

The Cinematography of 'The Ipcress File' and The 'Frame Within the Frame'
Los Angeles-based film editor Vashi Nedomansky writes about visual effects, low budget filmmaking and editing techniques on his blog. Recently, he wrote about the innovative cinematography in Sidney J. Furie's spy thriller "The Ipcress File." Indiewire is republishing his post below. In 1965, Sidney J. Furie directed the spy thriller "The Ipcress File" starring a young Michael Caine. Producer Harry Saltzman used the same core production team he employed on "Dr. No" (1962), "From Russia with Love" (1963) and "Goldfinger" (1964). Editor Peter Hunt, Production Designer Ken Adam and Composer John Barry gave this film a stylized, signature look and sound, one that was the antithesis of James Bond. Furie and Czech cinematographer Otto Heller redefined their visual vocabulary by deciding to shoot as much of the film as possible through obstructions or foreground objects. They did this on 100 separate shots. In the past, a large foreground object usually meant it was the focus of.
See full article at Indiewire »

From 'Vertigo' to 'The Descent', Tracking the Evolution of the Dolly Zoom

Vashi Nedomansky (via The Playlist) has published an entertaining and enlightening look at 23 classic cinematic dolly zoom shots from the likes of Alfred Hitchcock's Vertigo, to Le Samourai, Jaws, Goodfellas and Ghostbusters, giving you a look at the evolution of the in camera effect that can have such a profound impact on a scene without any post production visual trickery. The effect was first developed by second unit cameraman Irmin Roberts and accomplished by adjusting the zoom lens while tracking toward or further away from the subject being photographed. Check out the video below and I'm sure many of the shots featured you're going to remember.
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

5 Daily Tech Stories That Filmmakers (and Film Fans) Must Read: Best Filmmaking Apps, Women Film Pioneers and More

  • Indiewire
5 Daily Tech Stories That Filmmakers (and Film Fans) Must Read: Best Filmmaking Apps, Women Film Pioneers and More
1. Filmmaking Apps: Want to make a movie? There's an app for that -- or, to be more accurate, there are many, many apps to help make a movie. Check out our handy guide to the best affordable or free iPhone apps for filmmakers. Let us know your favorites and maybe we will feature them in a future story. 2. Blow Out: Los Angeles-based film editor Vashi Nedomansky writes about visual effects, low budget filmmaking and editing techniques on his blog. Recently, he wrote about how filmmakers split the focus in a shot by using a split focus diopter, a half convex glass that attaches in front of the camera's main lens, enabling the lens to focus on something in the background while the diopter captures the foreground. Nedomansky created a video which features all 15 split diopter shots in Brian DePalma's "Blow Out." Check it out here. 3. Women Film Pioneers: African-American women in silent film,
See full article at Indiewire »

Watch: All 15 Split Diopter Shots in Brian DePalma's 'Blow Out'

Watch: All 15 Split Diopter Shots in Brian DePalma's 'Blow Out'
Los Angeles-based film editor Vashi Nedomansky writes about visual effects, low budget filmmaking and editing techniques on his blog. Recently, he wrote about how filmmakers split the focus in a shot by using a split focus diopter, a half convex glass that attaches in front of the camera's main lens, enabling the lens to focus on something in the background while the diopter captures the foreground. A split diopter creates an illusion of deep focus. Brian DePalma was one of the first American directors to experiment with a split focus diopter. Nedomansky wrote about the director's use of the split focus diopter, specifically in "Blow Out." He created a video which features all 15 split diopter shots in the film. Check it out below:
See full article at Indiewire »

Watch: Alfred Hitchcock’s Clever Hidden Edits in ‘Rope’

The most brilliant trick of Alfred Hitchcock‘s Rope is that it takes place in real time. The second most brilliant trick is that co-star John Dall looks unnervingly like a 1940s era Jason Sudeikis. The result is that, in addition to being the textbook example of a bottle thriller, there’s a sense of incredible magic contained in how the film was made. The same way we marvel at the Cuaron/Lubezki artistry of That Scene from Children of Men, Rope elicits its own brand of awe thanks to Hitchcock, DPs William Skall and Joseph Valentine, and editor William Ziegler. Fortunately, Vashi Nedomansky has compiled a video of the 10 hidden edits in the film (for everyone interested in knowing how the lady is sawed in half) and written an accompanying exploration of the simple, clever techniques. The dissolve efforts are fairly noticeable — and have always been — but they provide an interesting version of a subtle act
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

Watch: Alfred Hitchcock's 10 Hidden Edits In 'Rope'

Given Alfred Hitchcock's penchant for thrilling stories that demanded a big screen cinematic backdrop to play out on, his decision to adapt Patrick Hamilton’s play "Rope" seemed odd. Set in a single room, where there was no mystery exactly but rather the tension of the murderers getting caught, so perhaps the challenge lay in the contained nature of the story. Hitchcock embraced it, decided that it would be his first Technicolor production (what better way to test the format than in a movie with one location?) and then attempted to create the illusion of a single take movie with no obvious cuts between scenes. While these days single takes are almost commonplace, it was certainly a bold move in 1948 and even if through contemporary eyes the experiment didn't quite work, it's still a lot of fun to watch. Vashi Nedomansky has put together a pretty nice 3-minute compilation
See full article at The Playlist »

Watch: Alfred Hitchcock's Carefully Hidden Edits in his 1948 Crime-Drama 'Rope'

  • Indiewire
Watch: Alfred Hitchcock's Carefully Hidden Edits in his 1948 Crime-Drama 'Rope'
In 1948 Alfred Hitchcock, long cinematically memorialized as an editing technique pioneer, completed his crime and suspense-driven and infamously homoerotic tale "Rope," based on the 1928 play. The film, while not necessarily narratively iconic in the same way that Hitchcock's other films were, was trumpeted as triumphantly experimental in that it featured edit-free, real time shots. Vashi Nedomansky has put together a video of the film's 10 isolated edits  that effectively showcase the notorious director's masterful technique of hiding those edits and keeping the action going onscreen.  Check out the video below:
See full article at Indiewire »

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