News

Why Lucy DeVito Doesn’t Reveal Her Last Name on First Dates (Exclusive)

Why Lucy DeVito Doesn’t Reveal Her Last Name on First Dates (Exclusive)
Just like her famous parents, Lucy DeVito enjoys making people laugh. “It’s not easy, but I love it,” the 34-year-old tells Et from her dressing room at the Jerry Orbach Theater in New York City.

Daughter to Danny DeVito and Rhea Perlman, Lucy has appeared opposite her father on It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia and in the 2016 film The Comedian, as well as on HBO’s Girls and Speech & Debate. Following her 2009 Off-Broadway debut alongside her mother in Love, Loss and What I Wore, the actress is back on the New York stage with the romantic comedy Hot Mess, playing Elanor, a quirky aspiring magician from Los Angeles who falls for a Jewish recovering alcoholic (Max Crumm) with a secret he can’t seem to confess.

Backstage, the actress talks about the blessing and curse of being a DeVito, the lessons her parents taught her about being successful in the entertainment industry and what’s next
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

Step back in time: 5 historical activities to experience in NYC

New York City is many things to many people. Yet, amid the shopping and skyscrapers it might be easy to forget that this is a playground for history buffs with a number of historic sites, landmarks and museums just waiting to be explored.

Here are just five of the historical activities you can experience in NYC.

History in the theater

For something a bit different, there’s a Broadway smash hit to enjoy. Settle in for a lesson you’ll never forget in the entertaining Latin History for Morons. Enjoy the Emmy Award winner John Leguizamo’s hilarious one-man show as he trails through 3000 years of history, meeting characters and uncovering truths along the way.

Theodore Roosevelt Birthplace

Theodore Roosevelt was the first U.S. president to be born in New York City, so why not celebrate his life by visiting his childhood home? Raised in a townhouse between Broadway and Park Avenue South,
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Quick Links

• Coming Soon Ant Man and the Wasp has wrapped filming. Apparently there's a scene on a beach between Pfeiffer and Douglas

• Decider 10 movies you should stream right now to prepare for awards season

• The Guardian apparently Feud is just making its way to the UK so there's a new Susan Sarandon interview where she defends her baffling political decisions of the recent past

• Rotten Tomatoes Jude Law has nabbed the male lead of Captain Marvel opposite Brie Larson

• Los Angeles Times John Lasseter, Disney/Pixar's long time chief creative officer, is taking a leave of absence from Disney after complaints of inappropriate behavior with female employees

• Playbill what are the plays that Broadway revives the most often? The top 12 features well loved playwright's like Tennessee Williams (though I was surprised by his second most revived), Arthur Miller, Eugene O'Neill, and of course Edward Albee's masterpiece Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf

• Variety Rance Howard,
See full article at FilmExperience »

‘Illyria’ Theater Review: Joe Papp’s Company Presents a Warts-and-All Look at the Man

  • The Wrap
The Phoenix Theater’s production of “The Seagull” marked Montgomery Clift’s big return to the theater, in 1954, after a decade of making movies in Hollywood. Unfortunately, the first preview of the Chekhov classic fell flat with the audience, and Arthur Miller was called in to give notes. According to Maureen Stapleton, also in the cast, the playwright was concise. “His first note was ‘I can’t hear you,'” she recalled. “is second note was ‘I can’t hear you,’ his third note was ‘I can’t hear you.'” That quote from Patricia Bosworth’s biography “Montgomery Clift
See full article at The Wrap »

Harrison Ford Worked as Joan Didion’s Carpenter: ‘I Didn’t Know Where I Was Going, How I Got There’

  • Indiewire
Harrison Ford Worked as Joan Didion’s Carpenter: ‘I Didn’t Know Where I Was Going, How I Got There’
That Harrison Ford worked as a carpenter before hitting it big with “Star Wars” is fairly well known by now, but what of his clientele? According to the new documentary “Joan Didion: The Center Will Not Hold,” the future Han Solo once slouched towards Bethlehem with the subject of Griffin Dunne’s film when she was living in Malibu.

Read More:Joan Didion and Arthur Miller Get the Documentary Treatment From Family Members, And That Makes All the Difference — Nyff

“I spent a couple of months there in their house, every day,” Ford says. “First thing in the morning, last thing at the end of every day, explaining why we hadn’t made more progress and how it was going to cost even more money.” Dunne is Didion’s nephew, and his movie about her — which premiered at the New York Film Festival and is now streaming on Netflix — took six years to complete.
See full article at Indiewire »

Lessons For Hollywood From Foreign Films — Nyff Critics Academy

  • Indiewire
Lessons For Hollywood From Foreign Films — Nyff Critics Academy
The following essay was produced as part of the 2017 Nyff Critics Academy, a workshop for aspiring film critics that took place during the 55th edition of the New York Film Festival.

In today’s intense political climate, the battle between nationalism and globalism is a widespread conflict, one that emerges in part from being alienated by a system that is unsympathetic and uncaring. Hollywood reflects this alienation by what it chooses to ignore: The industry continually avoids touchy film subjects, such as the lives of working-class Americans. The studio’s largest, mass-produced films play it safe by focusing on the all-inclusive entertainment value of superheroes and furry animals.

One might argue that the onus lies on American audiences, who may not be interested in realism, and perhaps it’s just a business decision on part of the studios. However, within the past seven years, American independent cinema has produced successful,
See full article at Indiewire »

2017 Ida Documentary Awards Nominees Announced, Including ‘Icarus,’ ‘The Keepers,’ and ‘The Vietnam War’

The International Documentary Association has announced its initial round of nominees for the 2017 Ida Documentary Awards, including special mentions and nods for limited series, curated series, episodic series, and more. Nominees for Best Feature and Best Short, and awards for creative recognition, will be announced on November 1. The Ida will honor director Marcel Mettelsiefen’s “Watani: My Homeland” with the Pare Lorentz Award. Also receiving a special mention in the category is Joe Berlinger’s “Intent to Destroy.”

Other standouts from this first list of nominees include Bryan Fogel’s controversial “Icarus,” Ryan White’s Netflix series “The Keepers,” Ken Burns’ revelatory miniseries “The Vietnam War,” and many more of the year’s best in documentary offerings.

Read More:Joan Didion and Arthur Miller Get the Documentary Treatment From Family Members, And That Makes All the Difference — Nyff

The 33rd edition of the annual ceremony will take place Saturday, December
See full article at Indiewire »

Hip Hop Redefined: How Arnaud Desplechin Uses Rap Music to Tell Fragile Stories — Nyff

Hip Hop Redefined: How Arnaud Desplechin Uses Rap Music to Tell Fragile Stories — Nyff
The following essay was produced as part of the 2017 Nyff Critics Academy, a workshop for aspiring film critics that took place during the 55th edition of the New York Film Festival.

Arnaud Desplechin may be the only filmmaker with a literary sensibility who understands the storytelling power of rap. His dialogue resembles a specific brand of French intellectualism that manifests in maladroit humor, and he maintains a general focus on epic, convoluted structures and literary motifs — soliloquies that break the fourth wall, omniscient narration, and strongly developed characters (which tie directly with his consistent lengthiness). His characters, while gauche, are irrevocably more privileged — they are artists and filmmakers, occupying large houses and indulgent with their resources.

This is why rap becomes a key contrasting factor in several of his films: Hip hop is not for the bourgeoise. The social issues that the lyrics of the rap songs often tackle have
See full article at Indiewire »

Westerns, Redefined: How Two New Movies Provide Fresh Meaning to a Dated Genre — Nyff

  • Indiewire
Westerns, Redefined: How Two New Movies Provide Fresh Meaning to a Dated Genre — Nyff
The following essay was produced as part of the 2017 Nyff Critics Academy, a workshop for aspiring film critics that took place during the 55th edition of the New York Film Festival.

The western is an iconic genre tied to the very genesis of cinema itself, but it doesn’t have the currency it held decades ago. That’s why it’s such a thrill to see Chloe Zhao’s “The Rider” and Valeski Grisebach’s “Western” — two highlights from this year’s New York Film Festival — reshape the genre from the ground up.

It’s only possible to appreciate that if you consider how far the genre has come. The western reigned Hollywood for decades—particularly from the ‘30s to the ‘60s. The genre’s appeal was that its unequivocal good vs. evil narrative could translate to any cultural zeitgeist. It wasn’t until Sergio Leone’s spaghetti westerns and
See full article at Indiewire »

Race, Religion, Immigration: 5 New Documentaries That Capture Our Divided Times — Nyff

Race, Religion, Immigration: 5 New Documentaries That Capture Our Divided Times — Nyff
The following essay was produced as part of the 2017 Nyff Critics Academy, a workshop for aspiring film critics that took place during the 55th edition of the New York Film Festival.

Tragedy begets tragedy. And in 2017, the global infrastructure’s threshold for human suffering seems to be testing its limits: environmental catastrophes are ravaging the Global South, refugees are fleeing war and persecution only to be met with xenophobic policies. Yet, in the shadow of the 24/7 news cycle, keeping up with current events can prove challenging. As the landscape for film exhibition follows technology’s rapid adaptation, offering new ways to watch movies outside of the traditional theater experience, the role of a film festival continues its evolution: extending its cinematic influence over the industry and the audience, and if lucky, offering a platform that can push the culture forward.

There’s no other place one can better witness that
See full article at Indiewire »

Telluride Oscar Watch: Gary Oldman a Sure Bet for ‘Darkest Hour,’ ‘Downsizing’ Mixed

Telluride Oscar Watch: Gary Oldman a Sure Bet for ‘Darkest Hour,’ ‘Downsizing’ Mixed
Here’s what we’ve learned after one day at the Telluride Film Festival, which draws folks from all over the world to indulge in a Labor Day Weekend ritual of film gorging. Before boarding the Delta charter plane from Lax to Montrose, Colorado, the new Academy president, cinematographer John Bailey, admitted he hasn’t seen Telluride co-director Tom Luddy, or director Paul Schrader, since Schrader’s 1985 film “Mishima.” Schrader’s rigorously elegant “First Reformed,” starring Ethan Hawke in his update of Robert Bresson’s “Diary of a Country Priest,” is looking for a buyer, and distributors are eager to check it out here.

At the high-altitude opening day patron’s brunch, Rebecca Miller cheered on her “Maggie’s Plan” star Greta Gerwig, who is making her directorial debut with “Lady Bird.” Miller is at Telluride with a documentary about her father, playwright Arthur Miller.

After the brunch, so many
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Telluride Oscar Watch: Gary Oldman a Sure Bet for ‘Darkest Hour,’ ‘Downsizing’ Mixed

  • Indiewire
Telluride Oscar Watch: Gary Oldman a Sure Bet for ‘Darkest Hour,’ ‘Downsizing’ Mixed
Here’s what we’ve learned after one day at the Telluride Film Festival, which draws folks from all over the world to indulge in a Labor Day Weekend ritual of film gorging. Before boarding the Delta charter plane from Lax to Montrose, Colorado, the new Academy president, cinematographer John Bailey, admitted he hasn’t seen Telluride co-director Tom Luddy, or director Paul Schrader, since Schrader’s 1985 film “Mishima.” Schrader’s rigorously elegant “First Reformed,” starring Ethan Hawke in his update of Robert Bresson’s “Diary of a Country Priest,” is looking for a buyer, and distributors are eager to check it out here.

At the high-altitude opening day patron’s brunch, Rebecca Miller cheered on her “Maggie’s Plan” star Greta Gerwig, who is making her directorial debut with “Lady Bird.” Miller is at Telluride with a documentary about her father, playwright Arthur Miller.

After the brunch, so many
See full article at Indiewire »

New York Film Festival Sets Documentary Lineup

New York Film Festival Sets Documentary Lineup
The New York Film Festival has unveiled the roster of its Spotlight on Documentary section for this year’s fest, which runs September 28-October 15. Filmmakers in the lineup include Alex Gibney, Abel Ferrara and Nancy Buirski, with subjects ranging from Joan Didion and Jane Goodall to Arthur Miller and U.S. immigration to the global refugee crisis. Two of the docus premiering the lineup — the Griffin Dunne-directed Joan Didion: The Center Will Not Hold and the Gay…
See full article at Deadline »

Vanessa Redgrave, Alex Gibney, Griffin Dunne Documentaries Join New York Film Festival Slate (Exclusive)

Vanessa Redgrave, Alex Gibney, Griffin Dunne Documentaries Join New York Film Festival Slate (Exclusive)
The 2017 New York Film Festival’s Spotlight on Documentary lineup includes work by a number of notable directors, with world premieres by Vanessa Redgrave (“Sea Sorrow”), Alex Gibney (“No Stone Unturned”), and Griffin Dunne (“Joan Didion: The Center Will Not Hold”), among others.

The documentaries on tap encompass a wide range of subjects, including the global refugee crisis (“Sea Sorrow”), male bodybuilding (Denis Côté’s “A Skin So Soft”), small-town racism and misogyny (Travis Wilkerson’s “Did You Wonder Who Fired the Gun?”), Rome’s biggest public square (Abel Ferrara’s “Piazza Vittorio”), and a 1994 Irish massacre (“No Stone Unturned”).

Related

New York Film Festival 2017 Slate Dominated by Amazon, Netflix (Full List)

There are also a number of works focused on individuals, including Rebecca Miller’s movie about her playwright father, “Arthur Miller: Writer,” as well as docs about the writer Joan Didion (“The Center Will Not Hold”), artist Jean-Michel Basquiat (Sara Driver’s “Boom for
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Peter Travers on Sam Shepard: The Cowboy-Mouth Poet of Stage and Screen

Peter Travers on Sam Shepard: The Cowboy-Mouth Poet of Stage and Screen
Rolling Stone's Peter Travers pays tribute to the late, great playwright/actor Sam Shepard: "It was never about him. It was always about the work." Everett Collection

Sam Shepard famously hated endings. As a playwright, he felt "the temptation towards resolution, towards wrapping up the package, seems to me a terrible trap."

He got that right. So Shepard leaves us to deal with his ending, a death at 73 at his home in Kentucky, surrounded by family. Als, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease, was the culprit. The obits pay
See full article at Rolling Stone »

The Salesman | Blu-ray Review

Iranian auteur Asghar Farhadi’s The Salesman was his second film to win the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language film (following 2012’s A Separation), which began receiving accolades immediately after its premiere at the 2016 Cannes Film Festival, where it picked up awards for Best Actor and Best Screenplay. Purchased by The Cohen Media Group, the title racked up over two million at the domestic box office thanks to an awards and marketing campaign which received an additional relevancy from the political firestorm regarding a travel ban which inhibited Farhadi from attending the awards ceremony (a platform which ended up as the program’s only significant political acceptance speech from the director by proxy).

Notably, this is a return to Iran for Farhadi after his 2013 French language debut The Past, though this searing indictment on the bothersome realities of vengeance and unjustifiably gendered power ethics doesn’t reach the formidable and deliciously exacting dramatics of his 2012 Oscar and nominated Golden Berlin Bear winning A Separation. Still, Farhadi’s particular theatrics remain idiosyncratic to his interests in exploring culturally specific dynamics between men and women, and have successfully elevated the international awareness and platform of Iranian cinema, and his latest (which snagged a Best Screenplay and Best Actor win at Cannes 2016) is another strident chapter on human emotions shackled by social convention.

In the midst of rehearsing their soon to open stage production of the famous Arthur Miller play, in which they will be starring as Willy and Linda Loman, married couple Emad (Shahab Hosseini) and Rana Etesami (Taraneh Alidoosti) find themselves displaced from their newly purchased apartment when the entire complex begins to collapse. Thankfully, Babak (Babak Karimi), their co-star in the stage production, knows of a vacant apartment where the couple can immediately relocate temporarily as they await a reimbursement for their damaged apartment. Their lives suddenly in disarray, Rana mistakenly buzzes an interloper into the apartment one evening thinking it is Emad returning home, only to be physically and sexually assaulted by a man who had come to visit the previous displaced tenant, a prostitute who was greatly disliked by her socially pure neighbors. The culprit flees the scene following the indiscretion and leaves his truck behind. While Emad and Rana attempt to pick up the pieces, their emotional disconnect causes Emad to go to great lengths to solicit an eye for an eye without the interference of the law.

The opening sequences of The Salesman provide the film with its overarching metaphor of an irreparable foundational disturbance, the unsecure building and subsequent evacuation resulting in a dramatic ripple effect. Just as the central couple in A Separation is (at least partially defined) by their parental roles, Rana and Emad’s predicament here is also born out of their childlessness. Devotees of the theater, (Miller’s tweaked text, including side jokes about the downplayed sexuality of the prostitute character Miss Francis is merely a backdrop and superficial subtext), it is inferred the Etesamis and their untraditional lives and interests are the potential cause for their current state of tragic duress. The power of suggestion is the significant thread connecting (and strangling) the major movements of The Salesman, which uses Miller not so much as a treatment of American vs. Iranian values, but as an experimental, doubling arena for the theatrical business of life.

The actress playing Miss Francis in the play assumes she is being demeaned by a male co-star because portraying a woman of easy virtue invites automatic disrespect; Babak becomes infuriated at Emad adlibbing incendiary lines during a performance; a woman in a taxi is convinced Emad aims to molest her because he sits with his legs open; and, ultimately, it is Rana’s fault she was raped because she didn’t bother to check who she opened the front door of her apartment to. Had Rana and Emad had children or more conventional professions, their own lackadaisically defined routines would have been in automatic check, or so the social circles around them in The Salesman seem to imply.

We sympathize more with Shahab Hosseini’s Emad, whose chronic frustration boils over into a Death and the Maiden style attempt at truth as vengeance. Because Farhadi, once again, only implies the trauma exacted upon Rana in her shower, it allows for us to be more estranged from her untoward behavior and subsequent victimhood and more celebratory of Emad’s impassioned attempt to rectify the situation by saving his pride (and, perhaps to a lesser degree, his wife’s reputation). Farhadi reunites with his About Elly (2008) cinematographer Hossein Jafarian to construct a careful examination of bodies in spaces, the suggested control and inherent power plays in blocking.

The final, intense third act returns us to the unsafe space of the crumbling façade, a touching metaphor for the grisly and unappealing outcome of Emad’s desperate ploy for closure and revenge. But as in previous works, Farhadi’s strength lies in his ability to cast adept performers able to convey the subtle complexities of his prose, and what Taraneh Alidoosti and Shahab Hosseini (both who have previously appeared in Farhadi’s films) achieve here is exciting as it is troubling for Farhadi forces us to ask why do we sympathize with Emad and not Rana? The audience, like the community and culture around Rana, become complicit in their inability to empathize with either females or victimhood. Until the magnificent finale, that is, when Emad and company (including a particularly arresting late staged supporting turn from Farid Sajjadhosseini) are taken to task, and satisfaction for anyone quickly dissipates into the realm of the impossible.

Disc Review:

For the film’s first availability on Blu-ray, this Sony release isn’t quite as persuasive as most of Cohen Media Group’s usual home entertainment releases. Presented in 1.85:1 with DTS-hd Master Audio, picture and sound quality are serviceably transferred in this high definition package. A lone extra feature begs for a more illustrious presentation for the lauded title, however.

A Conversation:

An interview with writer-director Asghar Farhadi on the origins and making of The Salesman is available as a bonus feature.

Final Thoughts:

In the same vein as Farhadi’s other tautly constructed social issue melodramas, The Salesman is another aggravating ripple effect of confounded displacement and fractured foundations.

Film Review: ★★★½/☆☆☆☆☆

Disc Review: ★★★/☆☆☆☆☆

The post The Salesman | Blu-ray Review appeared first on Ioncinema.com.
See full article at ioncinema »

5 Great Films New to Movies On Demand in May 2017, Including ‘Logan,’ ‘Get Out’ and ‘Raw’ — IndieWire on Demand

5 Great Films New to Movies On Demand in May 2017, Including ‘Logan,’ ‘Get Out’ and ‘Raw’ — IndieWire on Demand
[Editor’s Note: This post is presented in partnership with Movies on Demand. Catch up on the latest films On Demand here.]

Movies on Demand has another month of audience favorites in store, including some of the most popular titles of the year so far. Check out five of our favorite films from the upcoming month below, as well as the full list of great movies available throughout May.

1) “I Am Not Your Negro” (Available May 2)

Raoul Peck’s documentary about the life and work of James Baldwin is a stunning tribute to the writer’s vital work. Even thirty years after his death, Baldwin’s words still cut to the heart of issues confronting American society. With performances of Baldwin’s writing from narrator Samuel L. Jackson, Peck provides a deeply human gateway to understanding the achievements and contributions of a man who still has much to say about how our country understands race.

2) “The Salesman” (Available May 2)

Somewhat lost in the weeks of Oscars aftermath is the recognition of director Asghar Farhadi’s latest film,
See full article at Indiewire »

The Dinner: Director Oren Moverman Serves Up a Compelling Drama

Filmmaker Oren Moverman has never shied away from tackling difficult, seemingly impossible material to adapt to film with some of his writing work including the screenplays for Todd Haynes’ I’m Not There and the equally intriguing Brian Wilson biopic, Love and Mercy.

As a director and producer he’s followed suit with his 2nd film Rampart starring Woody Harrelson as an L.A. police officer with questionable motives, followed by a meditative look at homelessness with Richard Gere in Time Out of Mind.

For his latest movie, The Dinner, Moverman adapts Dutch author Herman Koch’s novel, which on the surface is about a dinner between two related couples with all the requisite food porn. As it progresses, it explores a variety of topics including mental illness and the battle of Gettysburg.

At the core of the film is Steve Coogan and Richard Gere playing brothers, the former a history professor,
See full article at LRM Online »

Father of Missing California 5-Year-Old Released From Custody Due to “Insufficient Evidence”

A California dad who was arrested after his son went missing has been released from jail while authorities continue to search for the boy.

Aramazd Andressian Sr. was arrested last Sunday on suspicion of one count of child endangerment and one count of child abduction. He had been jailed on $10 million bond. His 5-year-old son, Aramazd Andressian Jr. has not been seen for more than a week.

But jail records obtained by People show that Andressian was released from jail on Tuesday afternoon. His attorney told Ktla that he was released due to “insufficient evidence.”

Five-year-old Aramazd Andressian Jr. disappeared
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

California Dad Arrested in Disappearance of 5-Year-Old Son After ‘Contradictory’ Answers to Police

California authorities are searching for a 5-year-old boy who has been missing for more than a week — and have arrested the boy’s father on suspicion of one count of child endangerment and one count of child abduction.

The Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department is asking for anyone with information about the disappearance of Aramazd Andressian Jr. to come forward.

According to the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department, the boy was last seen by his mother on Saturday, April 15, when she handed him to his father during a custody transition. Three days later, she had a Skype conversation with the boy.
See full article at PEOPLE.com »
loading
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Credited With | External Sites