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Ventana Sur 2017: A 10-Point Wrap

Buenos Aires — The most bullish edition of Ventana Sur, Latin America’s biggest film market, closed Friday after a five days of screenings, a panoply of panels, deals, and unequivocal reminders that, in geo-content terms, Latin America is still on the rise as a film and TV power. 10 Takes on this year’s ninth edition:

1. Standouts: ‘Dry Martina,’ ‘La Camarista,’ ‘Love At Last Sight’

Che Sandoval’s “Dry Martina,” Lila Aviles’ “La Camarista” and Sergio Machado’s “Noah’s Ark” proved three standouts at 2017’s Ventana Sur. “Dry Martina,” from Chile’s Forastero and Argentina’s Rizoma, landed what to date looks like the deal of the market, here from Film Factory, within literally a couple of hours of its market screening in Ventana Sur’s Copia 0. “La Camarista,” Mexican Avilés’ feature debut, landed the biggest prize, the European Vision Award, in a strong Primer Corte pix-in-post edition. Starring Ricardo Darin, one of Latin
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Afm: Buoyant German Sales Companies Hit Mart With Full Slates

Germany’s muscular films sales sector is in full bloom at this year’s American Film Market, with lineups that include the latest in German-language films, genre titles and world cinema.

Arri Media Intl. is set to make a splash with the screenings of two German genre titles, Bogdana Vera Lorenz’s dystopian thriller “Lockdown” and Oliver Kienle’s psychological thriller “Four Hands.” The company is also presenting Swiss family pic “Mr. Moll and the Chocolate Factory.”

Arri Media Intl. has been focusing on co-financing and acquiring genre films, including elevated horror pics and thrillers, over the past two years, says sales and acquisitions manager Julia Pahl.

Global Screen is likewise embracing genre with a number of action-packed titles, including actor-director Ken Duken’s high-octane thriller “Berlin Falling,” in which a driver (Duken) picks up a hitchhiker, played by Tom Wlaschiha of “Game of Thrones” fame, only to discover that his passenger is a crazed terrorist with a
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Media Luna Acquires Rights To ‘Ana By Day’ (Exclusive)

Media Luna Acquires Rights To ‘Ana By Day’ (Exclusive)
Barcelona — Cologne-based sales company Media Luna has taken international rights – excluding Spain and France – to psychological thriller “Ana by Day,” currently in post-production and directed by Spanish first-timer Andrea Jaurrieta, who also penned the script.

The project first caught international notice when it was selected for the 2013 Ile de France Small is Biútiful forum in Paris, a co-financing event which has showcased key recent Spanish auteur titles such as Dani de la Torre’s “Retribution,” Fernando Franco’s “Dying” and Paula Ortiz’s “The Bride.”

“Ana” is produced by Andrea Jaurrieta P.C. in co-production with France’s Pomme Hurlante Films. Martín Samper at No Hay Banda serves as an associate producer. “Ana” is scheduled to be completed by early 2018.

Key cast includes Ingrid García Johnson (Jaime Rosales’ “Beautiful Youth”), Álvaro Ogalla (Federico Veiroj’s “The Apostate”) and Fernando Albizu (Daniel Sánchez Arévalo’s “Fat People”).

“Ana” explore issues of identity following a responsible and exemplary middle-class
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Media Luna boards Tadeusz Kantor biopic, co-produces first movie

  • ScreenDaily
Media Luna boards Tadeusz Kantor biopic, co-produces first movie
Exclusive: Jan Hryniak directs film about Polish artist.

Germany-based sales outfit Media Luna New Films has picked up international rights to Jan Hryniak’s Kantor.

The film is a biopic of charismatic and versatile 20th Century Polish painter Tadeusz Kantor [pictured].

Media Luna New FilmsIda Martins revealed the news to Screen on the eve of this year’s Polish Days at the New Horizons International Film Festival in Wroclaw (August 3-13).

The film stars Borys Szyc (Spoor) as Kantor, alongside stage actress Paulina Puslednik as Kantor’s first wife, and Agnieszka Podsiadlik (Baby Bump) as his second wife.

Produced by Studio Rewers, the biopic chronicles Kantor’s childhood through secondary school in Tarnow, his graduation from the Academy of Fine Arts in Krakow and activities in the city’s artistic community as well as his international successes from the 1960s until his death in 1990.

Director Jan Hryniak previously made Polish features The Third, Trick and The
See full article at ScreenDaily »

More Cannes Winners: Diane Kruger to Become the New Isabelle Huppert + Best Director Coppola Oscar Chances?

'In the Fade' with Diane Kruger: Fatih Akin's German-language Avenging Woman drama may give its star the chance to become next awards season Isabelle Huppert. Diane Kruger: 2017–2018 awards season's Isabelle Huppert? The 2003 Cannes Film Festival's Female Revelation Chopard Trophy winner, Diane Kruger was Cannes' 2017 Best Actress winner for Fatih Akin's In the Fade / Aus dem Nichts. If Akin's German drama finds a U.S. distributor before the end of the year, Kruger could theoretically become the Isabelle Huppert of the 2017–2018 awards season – that is, in case the former does become a U.S. critics favorite while we stretch things a bit regarding the Kruger-Huppert commonalities. Just a bit, as both are European-born Best Actress Cannes winners who have been around for a while (in Huppert's case, for quite a while). Perhaps most importantly, like Huppert in Paul Verhoeven's Elle, Kruger plays a woman out for revenge in In the Fade. Diane Kruger-Isabelle Huppert 'differences' There is, however, one key difference between the two characters: in Elle, Huppert wants to avenge her own rape; in In the Fade, Kruger wants to avenge the death of her Turkish husband (Numan Acar) and their son (Rafael Santana) at the hands of white supremacist terrorists. Another key difference, this time about the Kruger-Huppert Cannes Film Festival connection: although Isabelle Huppert became a U.S. critics favorite – and later a Best Actress Oscar nominee – for her performance in Elle, her (unanimous) Best Actress Cannes win was for another movie, Michael Haneke's The Piano Teacher / La pianiste back in 2001. At that time, Huppert also became a U.S. critics favorite (winning Best Actress honors in San Diego and San Francisco; a runner-up in Los Angeles and New York), but, perhaps because of the psychological drama's sexually charged nature, she failed to receive a matching Oscar nod. Last year's Cannes Best Actress, by the way, was Jaclyn Jose for Brillante Mendoza's Philippine drama Ma' Rosa. Huppert had been in contention as well, as Elle was in the running for the Palme d'Or. Diane Kruger Best Actress Oscar nomination chances? A Best Actress nomination for Diane Kruger at the German Academy Awards (a.k.a. Lolas) – for her first German-language starring role – is all but guaranteed. Curiously, that would be her first. As for a Best Actress Oscar nod, that's less certain. For starters, unlike the mostly well-reviewed Elle, In the Fade has sharply divided critics. The Hollywood Reporter, for one, summarized Akin's film as a “thriller made riveting by an emotional performance from Diane Kruger,” while The Guardian's Peter Bradshaw called it a “mediocre revenge drama” with “a not particularly good” star turn. Besides, since the year 2000 just one “individual” Best Actress Cannes winner has gone on to receive an Oscar nomination for the same performance: Rooney Mara*, who, though one of the two leads in Todd Haynes' Carol (2011), was shortlisted in the Oscars' Best Supporting Actress category so as not to compete with her co-star and eventual Best Actress nominee Cate Blanchett. Then there's the special case of Penélope Cruz; the 2006 Best Actress Oscar nominee – for Pedro Almodóvar's Volver – was a Cannes winner as part of that family comedy-drama ensemble†. And finally, despite their Cannes Best Actress win for performances in (at least partly) English-language films, no less than seven other actresses have failed to be shortlisted for the Academy Awards this century. Björk, Dancer in the Dark (2000). Maggie Cheung, Clean (2004). Hanna Laslo, Free Zone (2005). Charlotte Gainsbourg, Antichrist (2009). Juliette Binoche, Certified Copy (2010). Kirsten Dunst, Melancholia (2011). Julianne Moore, Maps to the Stars (2014). Coincidentally, that same year Moore starred in Still Alice, which eventually earned her the Best Actress Oscar. Warner Bros. will be distributing In the Fade in Germany later this year. Regarding the Oscars, whether late in 2017 or late in 2018, seems like it would be helpful if Diane Kruger got a hold of Isabelle Huppert's – and/or Marion Cotillard's and Jean Dujardin's – U.S.-based awards season publicists. * Rooney Mara shared the 2011 Cannes Film Festival Best Actress Award with Emmanuelle Bercot for My King / Mon roi. † Also in the Cannes-winning Volver ensemble: Carmen Maura, Lola Dueñas, Blanca Portillo, Chus Lampreave, and Yohana Cobo. 'The Beguiled' trailer: Colin Farrell cast in the old Clint Eastwood role in Sofia Coppola's readaptation of Civil War-set, lust & circumstance drama. Sofia Coppola ends Cannes female drought About 13 years ago, Sofia Coppola became the first American woman to be shortlisted for the Best Director Academy Award – for the Tokyo-set drama Lost in Translation, starring Bill Murray and Scarlett Johansson. Coppola eventually lost in that category to Peter Jackson for the blockbuster The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King, but she did take home that year's Best Original Screenplay Oscar statuette. There haven't been any other Oscar nominations since, but her father-daughter drama Somewhere, toplining Stephen Dorff and Elle Fanning, was the controversial Golden Lion winner at the 2010 Venice Film Festival. This year, Coppola has become only the second woman to win the Cannes Film Festival's Best Director Award – for The Beguiled, an American Civil War-set drama based on Thomas P. Cullinan's 1966 novel of the same name (originally published as A Painted Devil). With shades of Rumer Godden's Black Narcissus, The Beguiled follows a wounded Union soldier as he finds refuge at a girls' boarding school in Virginia. Sexual tension and assorted forms of pathological behavior ensue. Tenuous Cannes-Oscar Best Director connection From 2000 to 2016, 20 filmmakers† have taken home the Cannes Film Festival's Best Director Award. Of these, only four have gone on to receive matching Best Director Oscar nominations – but no wins: David Lynch, Mulholland Dr. (2001). Alejandro González Iñárritu, Babel (2006). Julian Schnabel, The Diving Bell and the Butterfly (2007). Bennett Miller, Foxcatcher (2014). Four other Cannes Best Director winners were bypassed by the Academy even though their movies featured – at least a sizable chunk of – English-language dialogue: Joel Coen, The Man Who Wasn't There§ (2001). Paul Thomas Anderson, Punch-Drunk Love (2002). Gus Van Sant, Elephant (2004). Nicolas Winding Refn, Drive (2011). In other words, a Best Director Cannes Film Festival win is no guarantee of a Best Director Academy Award nomination. Ultimately, Sofia Coppola's chances of an Oscar nod in the Best Director category depend on how well The Beguiled is received among Los Angeles and New York film circles, and how commercially successful – for an “arthouse movie” – it turns out to be. † During that period, there were three Cannes Film Festival Best Director ties: 2001: Joel Coen for The Man Who Wasn't There§ & David Lynch for Mulholland Dr. 2002: Im Kwon-taek for Painted Fire & Paul Thomas Anderson for Punch-Drunk Love. 2016: Cristian Mungiu for Graduation & Olivier Assayas for Personal Shopper. Both films opened in the U.S. in spring 2017 and may thus be eligible for the upcoming awards season. § Ethan Coen co-directed The Man Who Wasn't There, but didn't receive credit in that capacity. 'The Beguiled' with Nicole Kidman. The Best Actress Oscar winner ('The Hours,' 2002) had two movies in the Cannes Film Festival's Official Competition; the other one was 'The Killing of the Secret Deer,' also with Colin Farrell. Moreover, Kidman was the recipient of Cannes' special 70th Anniversary Prize. 'Sly' & 'elegant' Also adapted by Sofia Coppola, The Beguiled will be distributed in the U.S. by Oscar veteran Focus Features (Brokeback Mountain, The Danish Girl). The film has generally received positive notices – e.g., “sly” and “elegant” in the words of Time magazine's Stephanie Zacharek – and could well become a strong awards season contender in various categories. The cast includes The Killing of a Sacred Deer actors Nicole Kidman and Colin Farrell, in addition to Kirsten Dunst (the star of Coppola's Marie Antoinette), Somewhere actress Elle Fanning, Oona Laurence, Addison Riecke, Angourie Rice, and Emma Howard. As an aside, Cullinan's novel also served as the basis for Don Siegel's The Beguiled (1971), a Southern Gothic effort adapted by Irene Kamp and former Hollywood Ten member Albert Maltz. In the cast of what turned out to be a major box office flop: Clint Eastwood, Geraldine Page, Elizabeth Hartman, and Jo Ann Harris. Women directors at Cannes & the Oscars For the record, Soviet filmmaker Yuliya Solntseva was the Cannes Film Festival's first Best Director winner, for The Story of the Flaming Years back in 1961. The only woman to have directed a Palme d'Or winner is Jane Campion, for The Piano (1993). Early in 1994, Campion became the second woman to be shortlisted for an Academy Award in the Best Director category. The first one was Lina Wertmüller for Seven Beauties (1976). 'A Gentle Night' & 'Montparnasse Bienvenue' Qiu Yang's short film Palme d'Or winner A Gentle Night should be automatically eligible for the 2018 Academy Awards. But competition, as usual, will be fierce. In the last decade, the only short film Palme d'Or winner to have received an Oscar nomination is Juanjo Giménez Peña's Timecode (2016), in the Best Live Action Short Film category. This article was originally published at Alt Film Guide (http://www.altfg.com/).
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Media Luna Boards Carmen Maura Comedy ‘Oh Mamy Blue’ (Exclusive)

Media Luna Boards Carmen Maura Comedy ‘Oh Mamy Blue’ (Exclusive)
Sales agent Media Luna has boarded as a co-producer on comedy “Oh Mamy Blue,” which stars Carmen Maura, best known for Pedro Almodovar movies like “Volver.”

Maura plays Laura, a legendary Spanish rock singer who ruined her career and now lives in an elderly people’s home. Out of the blue, she receives a visit from her grandson, who leads her back to her roots.

Milton Garcia (“The Last Match”), Natalia Roig (“Volver,” “Food and Shelter”) and Ramon Barea (“Hitting Bottom”) round out the cast. The Spanish-language film, directed by Antonio Hens, has just finished shooting in Madrid. Hens’ company Malas Companias is producing.

Described as a “comedy with an introspective touch,” it mark a shift in Hens’ work as a director following dramas like “The Last Match” and “Clandestinos.”

Hens said he feels honored to work with Maura, who he describes as legendary. “The experience is even better because
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Cannes: Indie Thriller ‘Imprisoned’ Draws Ana Isabelle (Exclusive)

Cannes: Indie Thriller ‘Imprisoned’ Draws Ana Isabelle (Exclusive)
Puerto Rican actress and singer Ana Isabelle has joined Laurence Fishburne, Juan Pablo Raba, Juana Acosta, Jon Huertas, Esai Morales and John Heard in the indie thriller “Imprisoned,” Variety has learned exclusively.

The film is scheduled to begin production in May in Puerto Rico. 13 Films is handling worldwide sales and presenting the title to buyers at the Cannes Film Festival.

Paul Kampf’s Equitas Entertainment is producing. Producers are Paul Kampf, Holly Levow, Tom Sperry, and Luillo Ruiz from the Pimienta Film Company in Puerto Rico. Megan Messmer is co-producer with Equitas Entertainment. Executive producers are Walter Josten, Tannaz Anisi, and Greg Schenz.

Kampf is directing from his own script, described as a revenge thriller wrapped around a love story with the question of the sacrifices made for love. Fishburne is playing the local prison warden. Raba and Acosta play a couple and Isabelle portrays her daughter — a young woman who never knew her father.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Pedro Party: What Have I Done To Deserve This? & Volver

It's a Pedro Party. We're celebrating Almodóvar each day as we count down to Cannes 2017. Here's Daniel Crooke.

Women hold the universe together according to the peacock-feathered films of Pedro Almodóvar, and never more earthily or elegant than in his mirrored portraits of multitasking matriarchs putting out the fires of the men around them: 1984’s What Have I Done To Deserve This? and 2006’s Volver. Both domestic dramas with a hint of the supernatural, they showcase a pair of imperfect pragmatists – respectively, Gloria (Carmen Maura) and Raimunda (Penelope Cruz) – caught in the crucible of their everyday lives with no signs of slowing down, spinning an interminable amount of plates only to wash them straight after so they can serve their families dinner on time. While their inattentive lazybones husbands bark orders from the couch and fail to see the strength beyond their busts – no matter, as they’ll soon both
See full article at FilmExperience »

Pedro Party: Losing Our Minds Over "Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown"

We're celebrating Pedro Almodóvar all week. Here's Spencer Coile on his first Oscar nominee... 

Almodóvar is always at his best when also at his zaniest. Through a healthy mix of wacky characters and a unique color palette, he manages to imbue his stories with enough humor, drama, and wit to make any skeptic reconsider his artistry. Such is the case with his 1988 film, Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown. Telling the story of TV actress Pepa (Carmen Maura, Almodóvar most-enduring muse), we are plunged into a world of absurdity, loss, and the cocktails we make to cure us of our loneliness. After serving as his international breakthrough, receiving a Best Foreign Language Film Oscar nomination and inspiring a Broadway musical of the same name, it is no surprise that Women on the Verge has secured its place in the top tier of Almodóvar's filmography... 
See full article at FilmExperience »

Isa of the Day: Shoreline Becomes Latin American Talent & Literary Manager

Isa of the Day: Shoreline Becomes Latin American Talent & Literary Manager
Isa of the day is a continuing series of profiles of very special international sales agents. Shoreline Entertainment, one of the longest running independent film production companies and international sales agencies, has expanded its management arm to foster Latin American and women driven projects. You can see its Cannes lineup here.

The company was founded in 1992 by CEO and film producer Morris Ruskin whose production “Glengarry Glen Ross” launched him into the top level of indie producers. Shoreline’s Latin American Division for Management and Production is meeting with great success in repping over 25 directors, writers, actors, DPs and more.

Two interviews here, one with Alex Flores, the head of the division and the other with Diana Elizabeth Torres, a California based actress and writer illuminate their strategy and mission.

Alex and Morris’s friendship dates back 20 years, and their professional relationship flourished with films “Marilyn Hotchkiss’ Ballroom Dancing & Charm School” starring Robert Carlyle,
See full article at Sydney's Buzz »

Trevor Reviews Pedro Almodóvar’s Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown [Criterion Collection Blu-Ray Review]

It’s only February, yet The Criterion Collection has already released two exceptional screwball comedies this 2017. The first, His Girl Friday, released last month (and reviewed by David Blakeslee here), is a film that comes to mind whenever the term “screwball comedy” is bandied about. The second is Pedro Almodóvar’s 1988 film Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown.

Almodóvar, particularly at this early point in his career, was better known for dark comedies that did all they could to confront and provoke and remind everyone that with the demise of Franco’s regime Almodóvar intended to utilize a newly discovered freedom of expression, so the film’s provenance, combined with the film’s dark premise, means that the delirious, escalating light comedy of Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown will come as a surprise (a pleasant surprise, I think) to first-time watchers familiar with the rest of Almodóvar’s work.
See full article at CriterionCast »

Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘Manchester by the Sea,’ ‘Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown,’ and More

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

Fireworks Wednesday (Asghar Farhadi)

After a festival tour back in 2006, Asghar Farhadi’s Fireworks Wednesday was theatrically re-released by the newly established Grasshopper Films, and now it’s arriving on DVD. The drama is another precisely calibrated, culturally specific demonstration of Farhadi’s skills in constructing empathy machines. Further in line with the director’s filmography, this story has a nesting-doll structure that combines ingrained social hierarchies, domestic drama, and a tragic intersection of misunderstandings. And while it
See full article at The Film Stage »

Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown

Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown

Blu-ray

The Criterion Collection 855

1988 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 89 min. / Mujeres al borde de un ataque de nervios / available through The Criterion Collection / Street Date February 21, 2017 / 39.95

Starring Carmen Maura, Fernando Guillén, Antonio Banderas, Julieta Serrano, Rossy de Palma, María Barranco, Kiti Manver, Guillermo Montesinos, Chus Lampreave, Yayo Calvo, Loles León, Ángel de Andrés López, José Antonio Navarro.

Cinematography: José Luis Alcaine

Film Editor: José Salcedo

Original Music: Bernardo Bonezzi

Produced by: Augustin Almodóvar

Written and Directed by Pedro Almodóvar

Connected film festival attendees learned about Pedro Almodóvar before everybody else, especially if they had an understanding of new developments in Spanish cinema. Film school had shown us nothing but the very exceptional work of Luis Buñuel, most of which is really from Mexico and France. In the 1980s we Angelenos were just getting access to films by the old-school ‘traditional’ rebel Spaniards Carlos Saura and Juan Antonio Bardem.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Cannes 2017: Pedro Almodóvar Is Jury President

Cannes 2017: Pedro Almodóvar Is Jury President
Spanish auteur Pedro Almodóvar is the next President of the Jury for the Festival International du Film de Cannes, which begins on the Riviera on May 17 and runs through May 28, 2017.

Cannes executives Pierre Lescure and Thierry Frémaux stated:

“For its 70th edition, the Festival de Cannes is delighted to welcome a unique and hugely popular artist. His works have already carved out an eternal niche in the history of film. A long and loyal friendship binds Pedro Almodóvar to the Festival, where he was a member of the Jury under the presidency of Gérard Depardieu.”

The filmmaker said:

“I am grateful, honoured and a bit overwhelmed. I am aware of the responsibility that entails being the president of the jury and I hope to be up to the job. I can only tell that I’ll devote myself, body and soul, to this task, that it is both a privilege and a pleasure.
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Cannes 2017: Pedro Almodóvar Is Jury President

Cannes 2017: Pedro Almodóvar Is Jury President
Spanish auteur Pedro Almodóvar is the next President of the Jury for the Festival International du Film de Cannes, which begins on the Riviera on May 17 and runs through May 28, 2017.

Cannes executives Pierre Lescure and Thierry Frémaux stated:

“For its 70th edition, the Festival de Cannes is delighted to welcome a unique and hugely popular artist. His works have already carved out an eternal niche in the history of film. A long and loyal friendship binds Pedro Almodóvar to the Festival, where he was a member of the Jury under the presidency of Gérard Depardieu.”

The filmmaker said:

“I am grateful, honoured and a bit overwhelmed. I am aware of the responsibility that entails being the president of the jury and I hope to be up to the job. I can only tell that I’ll devote myself, body and soul, to this task, that it is both a privilege and a pleasure.
See full article at Indiewire »

Top 100 Most Anticipated Foreign Films of 2017: #38. Martin Provost’s The Midwife

The Midwife

Director: Martin Provost

Writer: Martin Provost

French director Martin Provost has consistently crafted strong, prominent roles for women (his first two titles featured Carmen Maura), but he achieved significant acclaim with this third film, 2008’s Seraphine, which won 7 of its 9 Cesar nominations (including Best Film and Actress for Yolande Moreau).

Continue reading...
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Rossy de Palma on Trusting Pedro Almodóvar, ‘Julieta,’ and Being Inspired by Women

When you think Pedro Almodóvar, you think Rossy de Palma. The actress’ unconventional, but striking, beauty has often made her the most memorable player in the auteur’s works, from her uptight virgin in Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown, to the heroine’s sister in The Flower of My Secret. In Julieta, which marks lucky number seven in de Palma’s collaborations with Almodóvar, she plays Marian, an overprotective housekeeper who looks after what she thinks should be her employer Xoan’s (Daniel Grao) interests. After meeting the title character, played in younger age by Adriana Ugarte, who is about to become the new mistress of the house, Marian reveals a secret that sets the entire plot into its tragic motion.

The usually glamorous actress – she’s been muse to designers like Thierry Mugler and Jean-Paul Gaultier – is seen sporting a frumpy, matronly look as Marian, in
See full article at The Film Stage »

Richard Linklater’s ‘Before’ Trilogy and More Coming to The Criterion Collection in February

Update: The Before Trilogy on Criterion is currently $39.95. Pre-order while you can.

After The Criterion Collection hinted at it and some of the own crew confirmed it, it’s now been officially revealed that one of their most-requested releases will be arriving next year. Richard Linklater‘s Before trilogy will be joining the colelction just a few weeks after Valentine’s Day, on February 28th, featuring new 2K restorations of Before Sunrise and Before Sunset as well as Before Midnight.

Special features include a new discussion with Linklater, Julie Delpy, and Ethan Hawke, moderated by Kent Jones, and Athina Rachel Tsangari’s documentary on the making of the most recent feature. There’s also the full feature-length documentary Richard Linklater: Dream Is Destiny, and more. While we’re still waiting on cover art for the Linklater set, check out the full details on February’s line-up below, also including one
See full article at The Film Stage »

Pedro Almodovar Opens Up About Panama Papers, Hollywood’s ‘Diabolical Sexism’

Pedro Almodovar Opens Up About Panama Papers, Hollywood’s ‘Diabolical Sexism’
Pedro Almodovar is tired.

The Spanish film icon is double fisting black coffee and water, his eyes look heavy, and he admits that after five days at the Cannes Film Festival, he’s operating on very little sleep.

Almodovar is in the South of France to hawk his latest, “Julieta,” an adaptation of three Alice Munro stories that stands as one of his most muted works. It’s understated depiction of a mother and a daughter’s deteriorating relationship is in stark contrast to his previous effort, the neon-hued airline comedy, “I’m So Excited.” That film had all the subtlety of a Gloria Gaynor anthem.

Julieta” was intended to be a departure in another way, as well. Meryl Streep was attached to play the mother role. Almodovar intended to make his English-language film debut, while shooting for the first time in the United States.

“At the last minute I felt insecure,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

'Sparrows' scoops Prague Grand Prix

  • ScreenDaily
Prague International Film Festival’s primary award went to Iceland for the second year running.

Rúnar Rúnarsson’s Sparrows was awarded the Grand Prix in the New Europe Competition at this year’s Prague International Film Festival - Febiofest which closed with the Czech premiere of Dexter Fletcher’s Eddie The Eagle.

Rúnarsson’s sensitive coming of age story is the second Icelandic film in a row to receive the top honour in Prague after Baldvin Zophoniasson’s Life In A Fishbowl took the Grand Prix home in 2015.

Amnesty International Award

Febiofest’s 23rd edition also saw the launching of a new prize, the Amnesty International Febiofest Award.

A jury consisting of the actress Martha Issová, the director of Amnesty International Czech Republic, Mark Martin, and the former Rotterdam programmer Gertjan Zuilhof selected Carlos Tribino Mamby’s The Silence Of The River from a line-up including Mustang, Nahid and Strange Heaven.

Speaking to Screen
See full article at ScreenDaily »
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