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Alejandro Iñarritu Ushers in the Future of Film With ‘Carne y Arena’

Alejandro Iñarritu Ushers in the Future of Film With ‘Carne y Arena’
Vr has long been seen as the future of entertainment, yet no film or TV production has been able to capture the true need for a 360-degree canvas — that is, until now. At Cannes, Alejandro Iñarritu unveiled his virtual reality experience, “Carne y Arena” (Flesh and Sand, or “Virtually Present, Physically Invisible,” as the exhibition is known at Lacma where it is on display). Critics could not stop raving, calling it “shattering” and “groundbreaking.”

The installation takes the participant through an attempt to cross the U.S./Mexico border, a horrific experience for so many immigrants. The viewer gets to observe violent border captures and watch dehydrated people, clearly in pain, being taken by police to detention centers. The participant can wander around or stay in place, watch the immigrants or the police while standing in the middle of the scene or to the side. Sticking your head inside one of the bodies shows its pulsing heart, which
See full article at Variety - Film News »

The Academy Presenting Special Oscar Statuette To Director Alejandro G. Iñárritu’s Virtual Reality Carne y Arena

Achievement in Directing winner Alejandro G. IñárrituThe Revenant” at The 88th Oscars® in Hollywood, CA on Sunday, February 28, 2016. ©A.M.P.A.S.

The Board of Governors of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences voted Wednesday (October 25) to present a Special Award – an Oscar® statuette – to director Alejandro G. Iñárritu’s virtual reality installation, “Carne y Arena (Virtually Present, Physically Invisible),” in recognition of a visionary and powerful experience in storytelling.

“The Governors of the Academy are proud to present a special Oscar to ‘Carne y Arena,’ in which Alejandro Iñárritu and his cinematographer Emmanuel Lubezki have opened for us new doors of cinematic perception,” said Academy President John Bailey. “‘Carne y Arena,’ Iñárritu’s multimedia art and cinema experience, is a deeply emotional and physically immersive venture into the world of migrants crossing the desert of the American southwest in early dawn light. More than
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Alejandro G. Iñárritu’s Virtual Reality Project ‘Carne y Arena’ Wins Historic Special Oscar

  • Indiewire
Alejandro G. Iñárritu’s Virtual Reality Project ‘Carne y Arena’ Wins Historic Special Oscar
The Academy’s Board of Governors has announced it will be giving a Special Award Oscar to Alejandro González Iñárritu’s virtual reality installation “Carne y Arena.” The award is being given “in recognition of a visionary and powerful experience in storytelling.” Only 18 Special Award Oscars have been handed out in the 90-year history of the Academy Awards. The last time the honor was given out was 22 years ago when John Lasseter was recognized for making the first CGI-animated feature with “Toy Story.”

Read More:Why Alejandro González Iñárritu is the Director Who Finally Got Vr Right

“Carne y Arena” is an installation that allows individuals to experience the refugee crisis occurring at the U.S.-Mexican border through the eyes of the refugees’ own journeys. Iñárritu collaborated with his longtime partner Emmanuel Lubezki on the project, which first debuted to rave reviews at Cannes and is now on display at
See full article at Indiewire »

Oscars: Alejandro G. Inarritu’s Virtual Reality Installation ‘Carne y Arena’ to Receive Special Award

Oscars: Alejandro G. Inarritu’s Virtual Reality Installation ‘Carne y Arena’ to Receive Special Award
The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences announced Friday that Alejandro G. Inarritu’s virtual reality installation “Carne y Arena (Virtually Present, Physically Invisible)” will receive a special Oscar statuette this year, “in recognition of a visionary and powerful experience in storytelling.”

The award will be presented to both Inarritu and cinematographer Emmanuel Lubezki at the 9th annual Governors Awards on Nov. 11. The duo has “opened for us new doors of cinematic perception,” AMPAS president John Bailey said. “Inarritu’s multimedia art and cinema experience is a deeply emotional and physically immersive venture into the world of migrants crossing the desert of the American southwest in early dawn light. More than even a creative breakthrough in the still emerging form of virtual reality, it viscerally connects us to the hot-button political and social realities of the U.S.-Mexico border.”

Inarritu won back-to-back best director Oscars for “Birdman” in 2015 and “The Revenant” in 2016. Lubezki received cinematography
See full article at Variety - Film News »

12 Movies with the Best Color Cinematography of All-Time

  • Indiewire
12 Movies with the Best Color Cinematography of All-Time
These days, major cinematographers like Emmanuel Lubezki and Ed Lachman are as much of a draw to serious moviegoers as the directors they work with. Currently, Roger Deakins’ masterful work in the visually stunning “Blade Runner 2049” has led to one recurring question above all: Will Roger finally win the Oscar? Among the more striking aspects of Deakins’ accomplishment is the use of color: Virtually every shot has a different palette.

It feels like something we’ve never seen before, but have we? How does today’s best cinematography stack up against the great color films of the past?

Since the early 20th century, there have always been experimentations with color cinematography, but it wasn’t until the late ’30s, with the massive success of “The Wizard of Oz” and “Gone with the Wind,” that color films became a staple of international cinema. With films stretching from 1947 to 2011, from masters like Jack Cardiff to Lubezki,
See full article at Indiewire »

Alfonso Cuaron Launches Mexico Rises Campaign for Earthquake Relief

Alfonso Cuaron Launches Mexico Rises Campaign for Earthquake Relief
Director Alfonso Cuaron has launched a multi-platform campaign called Mexico Rises, to provide urgent relief to communities in Mexico impacted by the massive Sept. 19 earthquake.

The fund was created with backing from Cuaron’s production company, Esperanto Filmoj. Anonymous Content and Participant Media are providing support to the initiative through the GlobalGiving organization.

“The devastating earthquakes in Mexico have elicited a deeply moving response from the Mexican people,” he said. “In the history of our community, we have never been so informed, united, and connected as we are right now. Citizens have taken this matter into their own hands and have selflessly and tirelessly worked together to come to the aid of their neighbors. Following their inspiring lead, I’m compelled to take action and join them to help begin the reconstruction of our beautiful country as it starts to recover from these tragic events.”

Cuaron won an Academy Award for directing “Gravity.” His
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Blade Runner 2049’ Could Finally Nab Harrison Ford and Roger Deakins Those Elusive Oscars

  • Indiewire
‘Blade Runner 2049’ Could Finally Nab Harrison Ford and Roger Deakins Those Elusive Oscars
The good news about “Blade Runner 2049,” which Warner Bros. and Alcon have been showing gingerly to thin slivers of press, is that it’s a gorgeous cinematic spectacle that more than lives up to its advance hype. What are they so worried about?

Well, the epic sequel set 30 years after the brilliant Ridley Scott 1982 original looks a lot more expensive than its $150 million official budget, and the original movie — which this builds and expands upon with care and finesse — was a critically hailed succès d’estime that failed at the box office. Scott’s influential future noir, which inspired generations of subsequent cinematic dystopias and came remarkably close to predicting what big-scale megalopolises like Los Angeles and Beijing look like today, has built its cult cred over decades.

Read More:Denis Villeneuve Is Eyeing ‘Cleopatra’ Remake After Conquering ‘Blade Runner 2049’

So following up that accomplishment with another one
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Blade Runner 2049’ Could Finally Nab Harrison Ford and Roger Deakins Those Elusive Oscars

‘Blade Runner 2049’ Could Finally Nab Harrison Ford and Roger Deakins Those Elusive Oscars
The good news about “Blade Runner 2049,” which Warner Bros. and Alcon have been showing gingerly to thin slivers of press, is that it’s a gorgeous cinematic spectacle that more than lives up to its advance hype. What are they so worried about?

Well, the epic sequel set 30 years after the brilliant Ridley Scott 1982 original looks a lot more expensive than its $150 million official budget, and the original movie — which this builds and expands upon with care and finesse — was a critically hailed succès d’estime that failed at the box office. Scott’s influential future noir, which inspired generations of subsequent cinematic dystopias and came remarkably close to predicting what big-scale megalopolises like Los Angeles and Beijing look like today, has built its cult cred over decades.

Read More:Denis Villeneuve Is Eyeing ‘Cleopatra’ Remake After Conquering ‘Blade Runner 2049’

So following up that accomplishment with another one
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Toronto Film Review: ‘Plonger’

Toronto Film Review: ‘Plonger’
“A relationship, I think, is like a shark,” says Woody Allen in “Annie Hall.” “It has to constantly move forward or it dies.” Though adapted from the Christophe Ono-dit-Biot novel of the same name, Melanie Laurent’s feverish relationship drama “Plonger” (meaning “to dive”) plays like a meditation on that quote, replete with the surprisingly literal appearance of a shark whose movements are tracked by a Gps device. A photographer who lives in the moment, Maria Valverde’s Paz falls in love more eagerly than she settles into it, and her restlessness courses through Laurent’s expressionistic bauble like an ocean current.

In her follow-up to the widely admired “Breathe,” Laurent returns to the theme of an intimate relationship gone sour, but the slight, repetitive scenario stretches the limits of her considerable visual imagination. The actress-turned-director is poised to make a big splash with the Nic Pizzolatto-scripted thriller “Galveston,” but
See full article at Variety - Film News »

The 7 Best Movies Coming to Netflix in August 2017

  • Indiewire
The 7 Best Movies Coming to Netflix in August 2017
Dozens of movies are hitting Netflix during the dog days of summer (click here for a complete list), but the sheer variety of new titles can be daunting. Movies are long, time is short, and indecision is brutal, so — in the hopes of helping you out — here are the seven best films that are coming to Netflix in August.

7. “Practical Magic” (1998)

Okay, so “Practical Magic” isn’t a “good movie” in the traditional sense…or in any other sense, for that matter. But it’s a perfect Netflix movie, which is another beast entirely. An incredible time capsule — and bottomless gif resource — from an ancient epoch that historians refer to as “1998,” this essential relic tells the story of sisters Sally (Sandra Bullock) and Gillian (Nicole Kidman) Owens, twin witches who are effectively cursed to remain single forever.

Did I mention that it was directed by Griffin Dunne? Did I mention that it was nominated for a Blockbuster Entertainment Award for including a Faith Hill song on the soundtrack? Did I mention that it features a scene in which Dianne Wiest and Stockard Channing use their secret powers to blend alcoholic drinks in order to lubricate a singalong set to Harry Nilsson’s “Put the Lime in the Coconut”? “Practical Magic” was kind of a blip when it first opened, but it would shake our culture to its skeleton if it came out today. A remake feels inevitable, but in the meantime, the original makes for perfect streaming on a lazy August afternoon. Better yet, add it to your queue and swing back once Halloween rolls around.

Begins streaming August 1st.

6. “The Bomb” (2016)

“the bomb” was one of the most exciting, unclassifiable experiences on the festival circuit last year, but the sheer magnitude of the project made it unclear where it might live once it had finished traveling the world, or if it would be possible for the public to see it. Fortunately, the answers to those questions turned out to be “everywhere” and “very.” Here’s IndieWire’s Steve Greene on the 59-minute film into which this enormous piece of experimental art has been newly reshaped:

Read More‘the bomb’ Review: New Doc on Netflix Is a Surreal Music Video About the End of the World

Directed by Kevin Ford, Smriti Keshari, and Eric Schlosser, this experimental, sensory history of the nuclear bomb is a staggering look at the world’s most destructive weapon and the lessons of almost eight decades that some still choose to ignore. Threading together modern-day news footage, Cold War era safety videos and grainy archival peeks into the construction process, “the bomb” looks at nuclear weapons in their myriad historic forms. Foregoing the usual talking head interviews or explanatory narration, the one piece of connective tissue throughout the film, besides the subject itself, is the film’s score, from Los Angeles electronic minimalist outfit The Acid. Throughout a harrowing parade of images and fleeting moments of whimsy, the droning, pulsating music underneath brings an alternating sense of dread and power.

Begins streaming August 1st.

5. “Cloud Atlas” (2012)

It’s easy to make fun of “Cloud Atlas,” and not just because one of the six characters that Tom Hanks plays is pretty much a live-action Jar Jar Binks. Tom Tykwer and the Wachowskis’ cosmically ambitious sci-fi epic is — in its own delirious way — one of the most earnest movies ever made. Adapted from David Mitchell’s novel of the same name, and now something of an obvious precursor to the Wachowskis’ Netflix series “Sense 8,” this symphonic story of spiritual connection spans from 1849 to 2321 in a go-for-broke attempt to crystallize the effects that one life can have on countless others.

Controversially casting individual actors in multiple roles (with many of the film’s most famous stars disguising themselves as different races and genders), “Cloud Atlas” fearlessly envisions our world as a place where bodies are temporary, but love is eternal. It’s a lot to swallow, but our collective cynicism only makes the movie more valuable, and more important to have on hand.

Begins streaming August 1st.

4. “Donald Cried” (2016)

Kris Avedisian flew under the radar when “Donald Cried” made the rounds last year — his self-directed turn as the most deeply committed man-child since “Clifford” may have been just a bit too raw and cringe-inducing for any major traction — but it’s only a matter of time before people discover one of the most fearless performances in recent memory. Here’s IndieWire’s Eric Kohn on a future dark comedy classic:

The obnoxious man-child is a common trope in American comedies, but few recent examples can match the hilariously unsettling presence of Donald Treebeck, the obnoxious central figure played by writer-director Kris Avedisian in his effective black comedy “Donald Cried.” While the story technically unfolds from the perspective of his old teen pal Peter (Jesse Wakeman), who returns to their Rhode Island suburbs from his Wall Street career after his grandmother dies, Donald welcomes his reluctant friend back to their world and won’t leave him alone. Avedisian gives Danny McBride a run for his money in this pitch-perfect embodiment of a wannabe charmer all too eager to remain the center of attention. Hardly reinventing the wheel, “Donald Cried” nevertheless spins it faster than usual, taking cues from its memorably irritating protagonist. Beneath its entertainment value, the movie also hints at the tragedy of aimless adulthood.

Begins streaming August 15th.

3. “The Matrix” (1999)

At this point, “The Matrix” has effectively become immune to any sort of qualitative criticism; there’s no use arguing that it’s “good” or “bad” or somewhere in between, it simply is. Less a movie than a cornerstone of contemporary pop culture (for better or worse), the Wachowskis’ absurdly influential orgy of mind-blowing action and high school philosophy arrived at the tail end of the 20th century in order to help define the 21st. Its aesthetic impact on the current breed of blockbusters is self-evident, but its more profound contributions have been largely off-screen, as the film brought futurism to the masses in a way that’s only possible to trace through its most unfortunate side effects (e.g. the diseased misogyny of “red pill” thinking).

Of course, “No can be told what the Matrix is. You have to see it for yourself.” Now that it’s on Netflix, it couldn’t be easier to do just that.

Begins streaming August 1st.

2. “Jackie Brown” (1997)

Every hardcore Tarantino fan’s favorite Tarantino film, “Jackie Brown” is more than just an homage to blaxploitation or the best Elmore Leonard adaptation ever made (sorry, “Out of Sight”), it’s also something of a tribute to all of the crime writer’s work and the scuzzy but soulful ethos that bound it together. To this day, “Jackie Brown” remains a major outlier for Qt. For one thing, it’s based on pre-existing material. For another, it’s got a bonafide sex scene. Last but not least, it’s about recognizably human characters who have genuine depth, who have real lives that feel as though they continue beyond the confines of a movie screen (no disrespect to the cartoonish avatars who populate Tarantino’s later, more solipsistic work — they serve their purpose to perfection).

Pam Grier is spectacular in the title role of a flight attendant with a drug smuggling side hustle. Robert Forster is heartbreaking as lovelorn bondsman Max Cherry. Hell, even Robert De Niro is phenomenal, the iconic actor beautifully playing against his legend by inhabiting the film’s most pathetic and disposable character. For anyone put off by the blockbuster scale of Tarantino’s recent work, “Jackie Brown” is a rock-solid reminder of his genius for elevating fevered pastiche into singular pathos. And the soundtrack owns.

Begins streaming August 1st.

1. “All These Sleepless Nights” (2016)

It would be reductive and unfair to say that Michal Marczak’s “All These Sleepless Nights” is the film that Terrence Malick has been trying to make for the last 10 years, but it certainly feels that way while you’re watching it. A mesmeric, free-floating odyssey that wends its way through a hazy year in the molten lives of two Polish twentysomethings, this unclassifiable wonder obscures the divide between fiction and documentary until the distinction is ultimately irrelevant.

Read MoreReview: ‘All These Sleepless Nights’ Is the Movie That Terrence Malick Has Been Trying to Make

Unfolding like a plotless reality show that was shot by Emmanuel Lubezki, this lucid dream of a movie paints an unmoored portrait of a city in the throes of an orgastic reawakening. From the opening images of fireworks exploding over downtown Warsaw, to the stunning final glimpse of Marczak’s main subject — Krzysztof Baginski (playing himself, as everyone does), who looks and moves like a young Baryshnikov — twirling between an endless row of stopped cars during the middle of a massive traffic jam, the film is high on the spirit of liberation. More than just a hypnotically hyper-real distillation of what it means to be young, “All These Sleepless Nights” is a haunted vision of what it means to have been young.

Begins streaming August 15th.

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See full article at Indiewire »

2018 Oscar Predictions: Best Cinematography

  • Gold Derby
2018 Oscar Predictions: Best Cinematography
At each of the last five Oscars, Best Cinematography has gone hand-in-hand with Best Director: Claudio Miranda and Ang Lee for “Life of Pi” (2012), Emmanuel Lubezki and Alfonso Cuaron for “Gravity” (2013), Lubezki and Alejandro G. Inarritu for “Birdman” (2014) and “The Revenant” (2015), and Linus Sandgren and Damien Chazelle for “La La Land” (2016). Will that trend hold true this year? The academy usually regards award-winning cinematography […]
See full article at Gold Derby »

Alejandro G. Inarritu Turns to Virtual Reality With ‘Carne y Arena’

Alejandro G. Inarritu Turns to Virtual Reality With ‘Carne y Arena’
Location-based Vr is beginning to blossom in museums as well as in dedicated theaters. Alejandro G. Inarritu, award-winning director of “Birdman,” created the “Carne y Arena” (Meat and Sand) Vr exhibit, which debuted at Cannes as one of the film festival’s official selections. The exhibit was also installed at Milan’s Fondazione Prada and has been on display at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art since July 2, functioning as a piece of politicized art to place viewers in the world of an immigrant crossing the Mexico-u.S. border.

Alejandro G. Inarritu wrote and directed the Vr experience “Carne y Arena.”

Emmanuel Lubezki

Participants begin their journey in a room similar to the cells in which the U.S. Border Patrol holds detainees, and after moving barefoot into another room — this one covered in sand and pebbles, with a metal barricade on one side — they put on Vr goggles to watch and interact with those making
See full article at Variety - Film News »

7 of the Best One-Shot Action Sequences, From ‘Oldboy’ to ‘The Revenant’

  • Indiewire
7 of the Best One-Shot Action Sequences, From ‘Oldboy’ to ‘The Revenant’
Most single-shot sequences, aren’t. What you’d swear are single takes are actually seamless edits — but that doesn’t dilute their mind-bending power. Even better: one-take action sequences like the third-act corker in “Atomic Blonde,” which sees Charlize Theron battling scads of baddies in a longform, long-take sequence designed to look like a single shot.

David Deitch’s film is filled with heart-pounding action scenes (Theron cracked multiple teeth while filming the Cold War-set Berlin spy thriller), but it’s that big final battle that action fans will remember. And while “Atomic Blonde” feels fresh, the sequence takes plenty of cues from single-shots that have come before.

Read More‘Atomic Blonde’ Review: Charlize Theron Kicks Ass In Cold War Action-Thriller — SXSW 2017

Fans of both Theron and single-shot sequences can get a small taste of the ass-kicking to come in “Atomic Blonde” (for the really curious, the single-shot segment plays out mostly on the stairs,
See full article at Indiewire »

The 25 Best Documentaries of the 21st Century, from ‘Amy’ to ‘The Act of Killing’

  • Indiewire
The 25 Best Documentaries of the 21st Century, from ‘Amy’ to ‘The Act of Killing’
Non-fiction cinema never stops evolving. From the Actualités of the Lumière brothers to the heavily manipulated ethnographic films of the 1920, from the vérité Americans of the Maysles brothers to the man-on-the-street approach popularized by Michael Moore, documentaries have naturally always been more responsive to their times than any other mode of filmmaking.

Not only do they reveal our world to us, but they shape how we view it, and the early years of the 21st century have proven that to be more true than ever before. On one hand, digital technology has infinitely expanded our range of vision, and some of the modern era’s most essential docs have been shot on consumer-grade equipment like iPhones and GoPro cameras. On the other hand, these tools haven’t just granted us new ways of seeing, they’ve also galvanized our desire to look, which in turn has stoked an unprecedented degree
See full article at Indiewire »

How a Chance Encounter With Terrence Malick Turned Trey Edward Shults Into a Filmmaker

  • Indiewire
How a Chance Encounter With Terrence Malick Turned Trey Edward Shults Into a Filmmaker
When Trey Edward Shults was 18 years old, he went to Hawaii for the summer to stay with his aunt Krisha – yes, the same Krisha who starred in his 2016 breakout “Krisha.” His aunt was connected to small filmmaking community on the island and got her nephew jobs working on commercials and other productions.

Read More: ‘It Comes at Night’: Why A24 Took a Gamble on a New Filmmaker’s Ambitious Horror Vision

“I lucked out and got on this Terrence Malick movie,” said Shults when he was guest on IndeWire’s Filmmaker Toolkit podcast. The small crew, sans Malick, was shooting footage of a volcano for the documentary “Voyage of Time.”

“It was five guys with an IMAX camera,” said Shults. “I loved movies, but I didn’t know how they were made, really. I didn’t even get what the guy [the film loader] in the changing bag with the film was
See full article at Indiewire »

LatinoBuzz, Cannes

LatinoBuzz, Cannes
As the star-studded Cannes 70th anniversary gala dinner wrapped up on May 23, a mariachi band came out to play “Cielito lindo,” “México lindo y querido,” and the Spanish version of “Happy Birthday” turning this year’s Cannes Film Festival into a celebration of #MexiCannes.2017 Cannes.. Photograph by Justin Bishop. Salma Hayek wears Yves Saint Laurent and a Boucheron necklace. Francois-Henri Pinault wears Gucci.Read more in Remezcla here. In a few red-tinted videos, Salma Hayek, Guillermo del Toro, Emmanuel Lubezki, Alfonso Cuarón, Alejandro G. Iñárritu, and BFFs Diego Luna and Gael García Bernal can be seen gathering around Table 46 to sing along with the mariachis. They also attracted other celebrities like Isabelle Huppert and quickly became the center of attention. As they loudly sang, a larger group surrounded them and recorded them on their phones. And with GdT giving the performance of a lifetime, it’s hard to blame onlookers.
See full article at Sydney's Buzz »

How Salma Hayek Pulled Off a Cannes Mariachi Stunt

How Salma Hayek Pulled Off a Cannes Mariachi Stunt
It took a determined Salma Hayek just a few hours to coordinate a Mexican sing-along surprise to close the May 23 Cannes 70th anniversary gala dinner. With more than 100 stars in attendance (Leonardo DiCaprio, jury members Will Smith and Jessica Chastain, past Palme d'Or winner Jane Campion), the bash already was a memorable one when, after midnight, Guillermo del Toro led out a mariachi band.

At Table 46, Hayek, Alejandro G. Inarritu, Alfonso Cuaron, Emmanuel Lubezki, Diego Luna and Gael Garcia Bernal sang songs from "Cielito Lindo" to "Happy Birthday" in Spanish. Hayek first got the idea earlier...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Cannes: Alfonso Cuarón On Del Toro, ‘Chivo’ And Giving It All He’s Got

Cannes: Alfonso Cuarón On Del Toro, ‘Chivo’ And Giving It All He’s Got
In Cannes Wednesday. Alfonso Cuarón gave a Masterclass spanning his life and passions: Friendships and films, made in both Mexico and Hollywood.

As Cuarón gave the class, he said, proving humble throughout his interview with Michel Simon, that the “true masters” were elsewhere in the festival, hinting that he doesn’t count himself among them. He pointed out that his was “a journey filled with insecurities,” which he considers a catalyst for his friendship with fellow Mexican filmmaker Guillermo del Toro, who Cuarón called a fellow “blue collar” filmmaker.

The two met making TV when del Toro complimented the Steven King story which Cuarón had based one of his pieces on, commenting that, “The story is so good, so why did your short suck so bad?” Although the words surprised Cuarón he says del Toro was right, and since then the two have been fast friends.

Born in a neighborhood
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Alejandro Inarritu’s Vr Experience ‘Carne y Arena’ Shakes Up Cannes Viewers – If They Can See It

  • The Wrap
Alejandro Inarritu’s Vr Experience ‘Carne y Arena’ Shakes Up Cannes Viewers – If They Can See It
Alejandro G. Inarritu and Emmanuel Lubezki are making a splash in the world of virtual reality with their Vr installation “Carne y Arena (Virtually Present, Physically Invisible)” but the Oscar-winning director and cinematographer are also playing hard to get at the Cannes Film Festival. Although the work is part of the official selection, the first Vr experience to make that prestigious cut, it is playing not in the Palais or elsewhere along the Croisette, but in a warehouse space 15 minutes west of town, near the small Aeroport Cannes Mandelieu. But you can’t just show up with your badge and.
See full article at The Wrap »
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