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Ringo Lam’s Sky On Fire On Blu-ray & DVD June 6th – Check Out This Amazing Stunt!

Look at this example of the amazing stunts in Sky On Fire!:

Legendary filmmaker Ringo Lam (City on Fire, Full Alert) returns to his Hong Kong roots with Sky On Fire, the explosive crime drama packed with high-speed car chases, dramatic plot twists and fiery gunfights. The film also marks Daniel Wu’s return to Asian cinema following his stateside success on the TV series “Into the Badlands” and the international blockbuster Warcraft: The Beginning. Wu plays a security officer who becomes embroiled in an epic battle to protect stem cell research, which can potentially cure cancer, from falling into the wrong hands. Also starring Zhang Ruoyun in his feature film debut, Zhang Jingchu (Mission: Impossible – Rogue Nation), Chang Hsiao Chuan (Wild City) and Amber Kuo (Lord of Shanghai).

Sky On Fire blasts onto Blu-ray™ and DVD June 13 from Well Go USA Entertainment.

The critics are impressed with Sky On Fire
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Ringo Lam’s Sky On Fire Debuts On Digital May 9th and Blu-ray & DVD June 6th

Legendary filmmaker Ringo Lam (City on Fire, Full Alert) returns to his Hong Kong roots with Sky On Fire, the explosive crime drama packed with high-speed car chases, dramatic plot twists and fiery gunfights. The film also marks Daniel Wu’s return to Asian cinema following his stateside success on the TV series “Into the Badlands” and the international blockbuster Warcraft: The Beginning. Wu plays a security officer who becomes embroiled in an epic battle to protect stem cell research, which can potentially cure cancer, from falling into the wrong hands. Also starring Zhang Ruoyun in his feature film debut, Zhang Jingchu (Mission: Impossible – Rogue Nation), Chang Hsiao Chuan (Wild City) and Amber Kuo (Lord of Shanghai).

Sky On Fire blasts onto digital May 2 and on Blu-ray™ and DVD June 13 from Well Go USA Entertainment.

The critics are impressed with Sky On Fire:

Glenn Kenny at The New York
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Hey Australia! Win Tickets To See Ringo Lam's Wild City In Cinemas!

Wild City marks a very welcome return for Hong Kong director Ringo Lam, best known for City On Fire, Prison On Fire, Full Contact and Full Alert. It is his first feature film in 12 years and the cast includes Louis Koo, Shawn Yue and Chang Hsiao Chuan. Thanks to its Australian distributor Magnum Films, we have Five double passes to give away to our readers. For a chance to win, all you have to do is to follow these two steps:1) Like the Magnum Film Facebook page, and2) Email your name and postal address to me at: hugo[at]twitchfilm.netWild City will open in Australian cinemas on August 20, and this competition will close at 3pm on August 18. -- Good luck!Also, you can find out more about...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

London 2014: 'Dearest' review

  • CineVue
★★★★☆

The taking of a beloved child is the nightmarish scenario at the centre of Thai filmmaker Peter Chan's effective melodrama, Dearest (2014), competing in the London Film Festival's Official Competition. China is painfully stricken by people trafficking, a fact that's at the forefront of Tian Wen-jun (Huang Bo) and Lu Xiao-juan (Hao Lei) minds when their three-year-old son disappears one day. Designed to tug firmly on the heartstrings, what follows is an intense account of their soul-crushing search that soon broadens into a desultory, but far more interesting examination into the consequences of such events. It's just another bustling day in Shenzhen when Lu Xiao Juan brings her son back to his father's shop.
See full article at CineVue »

Busan: Japanese Sellers Looking for Scarce Buyers

Japanese companies, including major distributors and TV networks, have come in force to the Biff Asian Film Market, but buyers look to be thin on the ground – or rather in the booths. “My impression is that the number of buyers (for Japanse films) has shrunk in the last two years or so,” says Kenta Fudesaka, international relations manager of Japanese film promotion org UniJapan. “It seems the hallways were more crowded when the market was in the SeaCloud Hotel.”

Fudesaka was talking about not only UniJapan, but the Japan contingent in general. “They’re here mainly to sell Korean buyers,” he commented. Buyers from other countries interested in Japanese product, he noted, can sample the full selection at the Tiffcom market in Tokyo Oct. 20-24: “They don’t really have to be here just for the Japanese films,” he said.

Among new J films on offer are the Shinji Higuchi
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Ilo Ilo wins top Golden Horse award

  • ScreenDaily
Ilo Ilo wins top Golden Horse award
The Grandmaster wins six awards in Taipei.Scroll down for full list of winners

Celebrating the 50th Taipei Golden Horse Awards, the Chinese-speaking film industry was out in full force Saturday night (Nov 23) at the Sun Yat-sen Memorial Hall in Taipei.

Anthony Chen’s debut film Ilo Ilo took Best Feature with a cash prize of $16,900 (Nt$500,000).

“Singapore is a very little country and we did this on a very little budget and never had we thought of winning Best Feature Film,” said Chen, who thanked jury president Ang Lee and the other nominees in the category, whose works he said he had all studied in film school.

About a Singaporean family and their newly arrived Filipino maid around the time of the Asian Financial Crisis, Ilo Ilo also won Best Original Screenplay, Best New Director, and Best Supporting Actress for Yeo Yann-Yann.

Yeo, who played a beleaguered working mother, thanked the director
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Ilo Ilo wins best feature at Golden Horse awards

  • ScreenDaily
Ilo Ilo wins best feature at Golden Horse awards
The Grandmaster wins six awards in Taipei.

Celebrating the 50th Taipei Golden Horse Awards, the Chinese-speaking film industry was out in full force Saturday night (Nov 23) at the Sun Yat-sen Memorial Hall in Taipei.

Anthony Chen’s debut film Ilo Ilo took Best Feature with a cash prize of $16,900 (Nt$500,000).

“Singapore is a very little country and we did this on a very little budget and never had we thought of winning Best Feature Film,” said Chen, who thanked jury president Ang Lee and the other nominees in the category, whose works he said he had all studied in film school.

About a Singaporean family and their newly arrived Filipino maid around the time of the Asian Financial Crisis, Ilo Ilo also won Best Original Screenplay, Best New Director, and Best Supporting Actress for Yeo Yann-Yann.

Yeo, who played a beleaguered working mother, thanked the director who is said to have altered the story to reflect her actual
See full article at ScreenDaily »

‘Finger of Doom’ is a delightful fusion of hard core action and horror elements

Finger of Doom

Written by Yau-Daal On-Ping

Directed by Pao Hsueh-Li

Hong Kong, 1972

It should come as no surprise that family is as important a factor in character relationships and motivations in Shaw studio pictures. What better variables are there to stir passionate acts of benevolence, friendship or vengeance than love and family? In many films, the terms ‘brother’ and ‘sister’ are employed as signs of tremendous affection and respect between members of clans, schools or other such tightly knit communities, despite that the people borrowing them might not be siblings. Call it cultural specificity, call it an easy way to build drama, but for what it is worth, it helps screenwriters and directors get the ball rolling plot-wise more often than not. 1972’s Finger of Doom from director Pao Hsueh-Li expands on the idea of familial bonds with a few twists.

A quartet of young soldiers is lured by
See full article at SoundOnSight »

For the Love of Shaw: Why Shaw Brothers movies are awesome

Shaw Brothers films are not exactly at the top of many film buffs’ watching list. For one, there has not been a traditional Shaw film, opening fanfare and all, in close to 30 years and a hefty portion of the public do not give catalogue films the time of day. Even for those who do, there is a vast selection of genres, directors, actors and studios that, often for good reason, will strike someone’s fancy more so than a 1960s, 70s or early 80s Shaw production.

It is widely known that said movies were produced at the speed of light, like cheap toys on a factory production line. Even so, their legacy lives on, with the bountiful number of martial arts films made and released in countries around the world, in addition to their critical role in making Kung Fu films popular in North America. For the decidedly smaller band
See full article at SoundOnSight »

‘The Mighty One’ is a fun film, if a mighty strange one

The Mighty One

Written by Tyrone Hsu Tien-Yung

Directed by Joseph Kuo Nan-Hong

Hong Kong, 1971

For as fast and furiously as Shaw Brothers studio churned out its action films and made stars of previously unknown actors, the number of names people recognize heavily favour the male performers. There were certainly women who became famous as a result of starring in Shaw pictures and receiving star billing, but much fewer in number and even fewer of them were the principle warriors of a picture. One such name that kept appearing in the late 1960s and into the 70s was Ivy Ling Po (Sword and the Lute, Twin Swords), who could deliver a really solid performance based on the script and hold her own with the boys when the rough stuff started. One of those starring roles was in the fantasy-laden The Mighty One, from 1971.

Master Lung (Liu Ping) is storming the
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Shaw Brothers Saturdays: ‘The Sword and the Lute’ ends its trilogy, but is also one chapter too many

The Sword and the Lute

Directed by Hsu Tseng-Hung

Written by San Kong

Hong Kong, 1967

After Temple of the Red Lotus and The Twin Swords both emerged onto the Hong Kong cinema scene in 1965, showcasing several brand new, soon to be insanely popular actors moulded by Shaw Brothers studios, among them Lo Lieh, Jimmy Wang, Ivy Ling Po and Chin Ping, director Hsu Tseng-Hung and writer San Kong removed themselves for 2 years from the world of Scarlet Maid, the Gan family and the fantastical poisonous lute before finally concluding the trilogy of films in 1967. By this time Jimmy Wang was a powerful name in the industry, appearing in numerous films and having starred in one of the studio’s most famous adventures, The One Armed Swordsman, with Golden Swallow to come shortly thereafter, which may in part explain why in this third and final chapter he is more of a
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Shaw Brothers Saturdays: ‘The Twin Swords’ lacks polish, but takes steps in the right direction

The Twin Swords

Directed by Hsu Tseng-Hung

Script by San Kong

Hong Kong, 1965

Few would debate that the single defining decade in the all too short history of the Shaw Brothers studio was the 1970s. The staggering amount influential films produced and released in that decade alone, films which made uncompromising impact upon release and gained sometimes feverish cult status since, is almost too much to count. King Boxer, Five Deadly Venoms and 36th Chamber of the Shaolin, all three from the 70s, arguably consist of the Shaw crown jewels. It therefore makes the discovery of films from the two decades which sandwich the 70s, the 1960s and 1980s, all the more exciting and revealing. Where did the quality of the of the all-time classics emerge from and which direction did it take afterwards? This week calls for a flashback to the previous decade, with the 1965 Hsu Tseng-Hung directed The Twin Swords,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

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