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The Love of a Woman

Welcome to the world of Jean Grémillon, where adult characters work through adult problems without benefit of melodramatic excess. The impressively directed experiences of Micheline Presle’s lady doctor on a storm-swept island opts for a progressive point of view, not sentimentality.

The Love of a Woman

Blu-ray + DVD

Arrow Video USA

1953 / B&W / 1:37 flat full frame / 104 min. / Street Date August 22, 2017 / L’amour d’une femme / Available from Arrow Video 39.95

Starring: Micheline Presle, Massimo Girotti, Gaby Morlay, Paolo Stoppa, Marc Cassot, Marius David, Yvette Etiévant, Roland Lesaffre, Robert Naly, Madeleine Geoffroy.

Cinematography: Louis Page

Film Editor: Louisette Hautecoeur, Marguerite Renoir

Production Design: Robert Clavel

Original Music: Elsa Barraine, Henrie Dutilleux

Written by René Fallet, Jean Grémillon, René Wheeler

Produced by Mario Gabrielli, Pierre Géin

Directed by Jean Grémillon

Film critics that pride themselves on rediscovering older directors haven’t done very well by France’s Jean Grémillon, at least not in this country.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Seven Classic TV Horror Movies

  • MoreHorror
By Erin Lashley, MoreHorror.com

When Michael Calls - 1972

Helen begins receiving phone calls from a troubled child who claims to be her nephew Michael. The problem is that Michael died fifteen years ago.

Phone calls from beyond the grave are bad enough, and these sound mighty eerie, if you are affected by sounds in horror films the way that I am. But what really has the potential to be chilling is the idea that, if it’s not a ghost calling, then someone has to be absolutely batshit crazy to perpetrate a hoax like this. Not only that, but they’ve managed to coerce a living child into making the phone calls.

Michael Douglas is here in an early role, and if you’re a fan of Falling Down then you know that he does disturbed characters very well.

When Michael Calls stars Ben Gazzara, Elizabeth Ashley, and Michael Douglas,
See full article at MoreHorror »

Scared of using the phone? You will be!

Your palms sweat, your bottom lip trembles, you can feel your heart beating out of your chest. Ring-ring, you’re home alone. Ring-ring, caller unknown. Ring-ring, who could it be? Ring-ring, Hello?

It’s become one of the most popular themes in horror films. From stalkers, psychos and serial killers, to ghosts, demons and the supernatural – the person on the other side of the phone is never calling to find out how your day was. In time for Halloween this year, The Caller, the latest addition to the array of blockbuster thrillers to make you jump at the sound of your own phone is out on Blu-Ray and DVD on 24th October.

This atmospheric, eerie thriller from British director Matthew Parkhill, stars Twilight’s Rachelle Lefevre and True Blood’s Stephen Moyer. Lefevre is divorcee Mary Kee, who is being harassed by a mysterious female caller
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Paul Massie obituary

Actor turned teacher, he quit the screen at the height of his fame

There are some actors who, having disappeared from the public gaze early in their careers, always prompt the question, "Whatever happened to ... ?" The answer, in the case of Paul Massie, who has died of lung cancer aged 78, is that, at the height of his fame on films and television, he gave it up at the age of 40 to teach drama at the University of South Florida in Tampa.

The son of a Baptist minister, Massie was born Arthur Massé in the city of St Catharines, in the Niagara region of Ontario. Although he was brought up in Canada, almost his entire 16-year acting career was in Britain. In fact, the only film he made in Canada was his first, Philip Leacock's High Tide at Noon (1957), a Rank Organisation melodrama shot in Nova Scotia. Although it was a bit part,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Saturday Nightmares: When Michael Calls (1972)

  • Dread Central
When did TV movies become bastions for battered housewives and other domestic tribulations? There was a time (in the 70s, mainly) when cable network original films were as worthwhile for horror fans as whatever genre offering was playing at their local theater. It was network television that introduced us to the Zuni Fetish Doll and Larry Drake in scarecrow attire. Now all that remains is cheating husbands on the Lifetime Network.

The first time I saw When Michael Calls, I was roughly seven or eight years old. Since it was a rerun of an old 70s movie, my parents thought nothing of letting me watch it by myself (usually my dad would watch these things with me – though more out of curiosity than any real need to ‘protect’ me, I’ve long suspected). Early on in the film, Elizabeth Ashley receives a phone call from her long dead nephew asking
See full article at Dread Central »

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