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Rachel Weisz in Second Trailer for Romantic Thriller 'My Cousin Rachel'

"Don't close the door, I cannot be alone with you." Fox Searchlight has debuted a second trailer for the new romantic thriller My Cousin Rachel, starring Rachel Weisz in a period piece based on Daphne Du Maurier's novel of the same name. Weisz plays the alluring cousin of a young Englishman, who falls for her as he attempts to seek revenge on her for supposedly murdering his guardian. Sam Claflin co-stars, along with Holliday Grainger, Iain Glen, Andrew Knott, and Poppy Lee Friar. There's some impressive cinematography in this, thanks to Dp Mike Eley (Nanny McPhee Returns), but as for the rest of it I'm not sure if it's for me. There is a great deal of sexual tension and confusion and all that good stuff. Take a peek. Here's the second official trailer for Roger Michell's My Cousin Rachel, direct from YouTube: You can still watch the
See full article at FirstShowing.net »

Rachel Weisz Casts a Dark Spell in My Cousin Rachel Trailer

Rachel Weisz Casts a Dark Spell in My Cousin Rachel Trailer
Fox Searchlight Pictures has released the first trailer and poster for their upcoming thriller My Cousin Rachel, which stars Rachel Weisz as the title character and Sam Claflin as Philip Ashley. This film will mark the third time that the timeless original novel by Daphne Du Maurier will be adapted, with the first big-screen adaptation debuting in 1952, starring Olivia de Havilland as Rachel Ashley and Richard Burton as Philip Ashley. The novel was then adapted into a 1983 mini-series starring Geraldine Chaplin and Christopher Guard as Rachel and Philip.

My Cousin Rachel is a dark romance that tells the story of a young Englishman who plots revenge against his mysterious, beautiful cousin, believing that she murdered his guardian. But his feelings become complicated as he finds himself falling under the beguiling spell of her charms. The original novel was first published in 1951, and also spawned a few other types of adaptations.
See full article at MovieWeb »

Rachel Weisz in Trailer for Roger Michell's New Film 'My Cousin Rachel'

"How easy it must be for a woman like your cousin Rachel to twist you around her little finger..." Fox Searchlight has unveiled a trailer for the upcoming romantic drama My Cousin Rachel, adapted from Daphne Du Maurier's novel of the same name. My Cousin Rachel stars Rachel Weisz as the cousin of a young Englishman, who falls for her as he attempts to seek revenge on her for supposedly murdering his guardian. Sam Claflin co-stars, along with Holliday Grainger, Iain Glen, Andrew Knott, and Poppy Lee Friar. This is a very powerful trailer with a very mood song in it that is designed to provoke emotions and pull viewers in. I'm curious, but not really sure what to expect, it seems a bit too romantic for my tastes. Here's the official trailer (+ poster) for Roger Michell's My Cousin Rachel, direct from YouTube: A dark romance, My Cousin Rachel
See full article at FirstShowing.net »

First UK Poster & Trailer for My Cousin Rachel starring Rachel Weisz & Sam Claflin

  • HeyUGuys
Author: David Sztypuljak

With Denial in cinemas this week starring the fabulous Rachel Weisz as Professor Deborah E. Lipstadt it comes as no surprise that Fox Searchlight have released the first UK poster & trailer for My Cousin Rachel starring Weisz and her co-star Sam Claflin (The Hunger Games). For anyone unsure, this is most definitely not a sequel to the 1992 movie My Cousin Vinny starring Joe Pesci, Ralph Macchio and Marisa Tomei… as nice as that would be!

The movie is an adaptation of Daphne du Maurier’s (author of Rebecca, The Birds) acclaimed novel of the same name and is helmed by Notting Hill / Morning Glory director Roger Michell.

Sam Claflin in My Cousin Rachel

My Cousin Rachel is a dark romance about a young Englishman who plots revenge again his mysterious beautiful cousin believing that she’s murdered his guardian. His feelings becoming rather more complicated when the finds himself falling for her.
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Neil Morrissey joins the cast of ITV period drama Grantchester for series 2

Neil Morrissey is starring in series two of ITV's period drama Grantchester.

The actor will appear alongside James Norton and Robson Green, who star as clergyman Sidney Chambers and police inspector Geordie Keating investigating crimes in the 1950s-set village.

Morrissey will play Harding Redmond, the father of teenage girl Abigail (Grace Holley) who is found dead in Grantchester under suspicious circumstances.

He accuses Chambers of having an inappropriate relationship with his daughter - forcing the clergyman to both investigate the girl's murder and clear his name.

But is it too late to save his reputation amongst the residents of Grantchester?

Morrissey said of his new role: "I'm really excited to be joining the cast of Grantchester. It's great to work with James Norton, Robson Green and the rest of the cast, and I can't wait to film in the actual village of Grantchester, which I know is beautiful.

"I'm also
See full article at Digital Spy - TV news »

This week's new films

Cloud Atlas | To The Wonder | Lore | Gangs Of Wasseypur Part 1 | Song For Marion | Mama | Before Dawn | Crawl | Ollie Kepler's Expanding Purple World | Fire In The Blood | The Road: A Story Of Life And Death | We Are Northern Lights | Breath Of The Gods

Cloud Atlas (15)

(Andy & Lana Wachowski, Tom Tykwer, 2012, Ger/Us/Hk/Sin) Tom Hanks, Halle Berry, Hugh Grant, Jim Broadbent. 172 mins

You've got to admire the ambition of trying to tell six stories at once, together spanning the 19th to 24th century. There are connections and parallels, of course, but also wild variations in tone and effectiveness. The experience is a little like channel surfing between Tom Hanks movies, but it's greater than the sum of its parts.

To The Wonder (12A)

(Terrence Malick, 2012, Us) Olga Kurylenko, Ben Affleck, Rachel McAdams. 113 mins

Those entranced (or put off) by The Tree Of Life will get more of the same from
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Ollie Kepler's Expanding Purple World – review

Viv Fongenie's second feature, about an astronomy buff who becomes schizophrenic, is a textured and engaging look at mental illness

The desolate expanses of the universe are telescoped into one man's head in British director Viv Fongenie's second feature, as web designer and astronomy buff Ollie Kepler (the clue's in the name) slips into paranoid schizophrenia after the death of his girlfriend. Edward Hogg – skullcap hair and furious eyes, obsessing over heat death and cramming imaginary microchips into blocks of mature Scottish cheddar – is good as Kepler. But praise is also due to straight man Andrew Knott, selfless in the (in both senses) support role: Kepler's bewildered best friend, a window on the other side of the mental-illness experience. A textured and engaging look at a subject that often doesn't want to be looked at.

Rating: 3/5

DramaPhil Hoad

guardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Guillermo del Toro to produce 'Secret Garden' adaptation

Guillermo del Toro to produce 'Secret Garden' adaptation
Guillermo del Toro is to produce a new movie adaptation of The Secret Garden.

The Hellboy filmmaker will oversee the project's development alongside his Don't Be Afraid of the Dark collaborator Mark Johnson, Deadline reports.

Beasts of the Southern Wild screenwriter Lucy Alibar will pen a script for the film based on Frances Hodgson Burnett's 1911 novel of the same name.

The Secret Garden has been adapted on numerous past occasions for theatre, film and television. Kate Maberly, Andrew Knott and Dame Maggie Smith starred in a 1993 cinematic adaptation directed by Agnieszka Holland.

Del Toro already has numerous projects in development, including his Pinocchio adaptation and Crimson Peak, both of which are in pre-production.

His next directorial venture will be Pacific Rim, which opens in the UK on July 12.

Watch a trailer for Pacific Rim below:
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

Backbeat: Theater Review

Backbeat: Theater Review
Another film-to-stage adaptation, this time from Iain Softley’s 1994 debut feature starring Stephen Dorff and Ian Hart, Backbeat presents the Beatles as archetypal mythic figures, which indeed they have become, undergoing a Joseph Campbell-styled coming-of-age saga as a band. The tragic protagonist is the brooding and talented painter Stuart Sutcliffe (Nick Blood). He is press-ganged by his domineering classmate John Lennon (Andrew Knott) into his band The Quarrymen, promptly redubbed "The Beatals" (sic) by the too-cool-for-school Sutcliffe. The early scene where Lennon tutors Sutcliffe in how to play three strings on the

read more
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Seamonsters | Review - Austin Film Festival 2011

Director: Julian Kerridge Writers: Martin Sadofski, Julian Kerridge Starring: Jack McMullen, Reece Noi, Leila Mimmack, Georgia Henshaw, Rita Tushingham, Maggie O'Neill, Andrew Knott Seamonsters tells the story of two shiftless young friends, Sam (Jack McMullen) and Kieran (Reece Noi), who are biding their time during the off-season in the English seaside town of Worthing. Sam and Kieran are stuck in a kind of shiftless limbo. Too old to be kids any more, they drift along without any plans for the future, vaguely aware that they’re expected to be adults. Kieran is skittish and unpredictable, perhaps a little bit crazy. Sam is quiet and sensitive, and tends to back down when challenged. Of course, even lifelong friendships can completely derail when a girl enters the picture. One day the boys meet Lori (Leila Mimmack), a mysterious, dark-eyed girl who’s somehow escaped their notice until now. Lori lives on the fringes with her sad,
See full article at SmellsLikeScreenSpirit »

In Our Name Movie Review

In Our Name Movie Review
Title: In Our Name Writer-director: Brian Welsh Starring: Joanne Froggatt, Mel Raido, Andrew Knott, Chloe-Jayne Wilkinson, Janine Leigh, Shah Amin A British coming-home-from-war drama that toes the line between pedestrian and interesting, though tilting toward the former, ‘In Our Name’ connects chiefly as a gender-shift curiosity given its main focus on a female soldier. Joanne Froggatt’s engaging performance, which picked up the Most Promising Newcomer prize at this past year’s British Independent Film Awards, is the chief selling point of writer-director Brian Welsh’s sophomore outing, which otherwise cycles through the expected interpersonal difficulties of trying to readjust to civilian and married life. ‘In Our Name’ opens with Suzy Jackson (Froggatt) returning...
See full article at ShockYa »

First look at Seamonsters

  • ScreenTerrier
Filmed last year in Worthing and London,  Seamonsters tells the tale of two best mates, Sam and Kieran; a bewitching traveller girl, Lori; Moony, waitress and dreamer. Wild young lives which are torn apart by a terrible tragedy.

Jack McMullen from Waterloo Road stars as Sam, and Reece Noi, recently seen in BBC legal drama Silk, as Kieran.

With Leila Mimmack, who starred as Christa in the Being Human spin-off Becoming Human, as Lori and Georgia Henshaw, who'll also be seen later this year in another independent feature In The Dark Half, as Moony.

Seamonsters is adapted from the Royal Court play "Outside Of Heaven" by Martin Sadofski, and directed by London Film School graduate Julian Kerridge, his first feature film after several award-winning shorts.

The film also stars Rita Tushingham, Maggie O'Neill and Andrew Knott.
See full article at ScreenTerrier »

TV Review: Frankenstein’S Wedding; the Creature’s alive, but the live drama’s dead

There’s a sudden appetite for Mary Shelley’s “Frankenstein” to become a transmedia spectacle. Filmmaker Danny Boyle is currently directing an adaptation of the classic Victorian novel for the National Theatre (with Benedict Cumberbatch and Jonny Lee Miller alternating roles as Frankenstein and his Creature), which was also broadcast to selected cinemas around the world. And last night, BBC3 delivered the horror-musical Frankenstein’s Wedding (a modern spin on Shelley’s masterpiece), which went out live to the nation from Leeds’ Kirkstall Abbey, where 12,000 people had gathered to be part of the performance.

There was ambition to Frankenstein’s Wedding, that much is definitely true, but this live 80-minute spectacle was a mostly laborious and underwhelming flop. A great idea, but the execution didn’t fulfill its promise. Opening on Kirkstall Abbey (after a weird intro from DJ Reggie Yates) the live audience were playing the wedding guests for
See full article at Obsessed with Film »

In Our Name review

Newcomer Scottish director Brian Welsh's second feature, In Our Name, is a brave and moving exploration of what it's like for soldiers returning from war to suddenly adjust to the relative peace of civilian life.

Having undergone gunner training in North-West Iraq, Suzy returns home fourteen months later to a welcome party and Union Jack flags. At first she's seems unaffected by her “tough but rewarding” tour; but as the days pass, her husband, Mark, notices she's emotionally and sexually withdrawn, and fellow officer Paul describes her as “out of it”.

Haunted by the memory of a young Iraqi girl's death, for which Suzy feels responsible, having given the reluctant child sweets only to later see her gunned down for communicating with soldiers. Her own daughter, Cass, acts as a constant reminder of the event for Suzy, and she soon becomes unhealthily obsessed with protecting her - the gang
See full article at Shadowlocked »

In Our Name review

Newcomer Scottish director Brian Welsh's second feature, In Our Name, is a brave and moving exploration of what it's like for soldiers returning from war to suddenly adjust to the relative peace of civilian life.

Having undergone gunner training in North-West Iraq, Suzy returns home fourteen months later to a welcome party and Union Jack flags. At first she's seems unaffected by her “tough but rewarding” tour; but as the days pass, her husband, Mark, notices she's emotionally and sexually withdrawn and fellow officer, Paul, describes her as “out of it”.

Haunted by the memory of a young Iraqi girl's death, for which Suzy feels responsible, having given the reluctant child sweets only to later see her gunned down for communicating with soldiers. Her own daughter, Cass, acts as a constant reminder of the event for Suzy, and she soon becomes unhealthily obsessed with protecting her - the gang
See full article at Shadowlocked »

In Our Name review

Newcomer Scottish director Brian Welsh's second feature, In Our Name, is a brave and moving exploration of what it's like for soldiers returning from war to suddenly adjust to the relative peace of civilian life.

Having undergone gunner training in North-West Iraq, Suzy returns home fourteen months later to a welcome party and Union Jack flags. At first she's seems unaffected by her “tough but rewarding” tour; but as the days pass, her husband, Mark, notices she's emotionally and sexually withdrawn and fellow officer, Paul, describes her as “out of it”.

Haunted by the memory of a young Iraqi girl's death, for which Suzy feels responsible, having given the reluctant child sweets only to later see her gunned down for communicating with soldiers. Her own daughter, Cass, acts as a constant reminder of the event for Suzy, and she soon becomes unhealthily obsessed with protecting her - the gang
See full article at Shadowlocked »

In Our Name review

Newcomer Scottish director Brian Welsh's second feature, In Our Name, is a brave and moving exploration of what it's like for soldiers returning from war to suddenly adjust to the relative peace of civilian life.

Having undergone gunner training in North-West Iraq, Suzy returns home fourteen months later to a welcome party and Union Jack flags. At first she's seems unaffected by her “tough but rewarding” tour; but as the days pass, her husband, Mark, notices she's emotionally and sexually withdrawn and fellow officer, Paul, describes her as “out of it”.

Haunted by the memory of a young Iraqi girl's death, for which Suzy feels responsible, having given the reluctant child sweets only to later see her gunned down for communicating with soldiers. Her own daughter, Cass, acts as a constant reminder of the event for Suzy, and she soon becomes unhealthily obsessed with protecting her - the gang
See full article at Shadowlocked »

Lff 2010: In Our Name Review

  • HeyUGuys
The protagonist of In Our Name is Suzy (Joanne Froggat), a British soldier returning home after a traumatic tour in Iraq. Suzy returns to the embrace of her wider family, her husband Mark (Mel Raido) and her young daughter Cass (Chloe Jayne Wilkinson). Her husband Mark (Mel Raido) is preoccupied with getting Suzy into bed as soon as possible and seems to care little about her mental state or the fraught relationship between her and her daughter. Suzy is clearly not well though and the lack of care and attention to this from her husband in the early scenes sets up his character as uncaring and incredibly unlikeable.

The central performance by Joanne Froggat as the troubled soldier is quite adept but it is not enough as In Our Name constantly fails in almost every other area. The supporting performances are very weak in places despite having little to do
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Movie spotlight: The Secret Garden (1993), starring Kate Maberly

The Secret Garden. Family/Drama. Rated G. Recommended for viewing by adults and kids of all ages. Check your favorite local and online movie rental stores for availability. Some movies may be borrowed from your local public library. The Secret Garden is a one-hour, forty-two minute, Warner Brothers 1993 release, in color, directed by Agnieszka Holland, starring Kate Maberly, Heydon Prowse, Andrew Knott, John Lynch and Maggie Smith. This movie is based on the novel The Secret Garden, by Frances Hodgson Burnett, who also authored another well-known classic, A Little Princess. While on the...
See full article at Examiner Movies Channel »

2010 Raindance Film Festival Line-Up Announced

  • HeyUGuys
The line-up for the 18th Raindance Film Festival was announced today at a press launch held at the May Fair Hotel in London. This years line-up includes 77 feature films, 69 UK premieres and 133 short films, special live events, exclusive Q&As and masterclasses.

The festival will run from September 29 – October 10.

Opening the festival on Wednesday 29th September is Jackboots On Whitehall – a satirical animation about an alternative history of World War II where the Nazis seize London and England must band together to prevent a full on invasion. Star voiceover cast includes: Ewan McGregor, Rosamund Pike,Richard E. Grant, Timothy Spall, Tom Wilkinson, Alan Cumming, Richard Griffiths, Stephen Merchant and Richard O’Brien. It will be followed by an after-party with live set from rising Us indie band stars Airborne Toxic Event and DJ set from one of the most influential DJs in the UK – Andrew Weatherall. The following day will
See full article at HeyUGuys »
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