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The Chase (UK)

A big welcome to UK disc purveyors Indicator, or Powerhouse, or how does Powerhouse Indicator sound? Savant’s first review from the new label is a favorite from the Columbia library. The extras are the lure: they company has snagged long-form, in-depth interviews with James Fox and director Arthur Penn. Everybody’s written about The Chase but here Penn tells his side of the story.

The Chase (1966)

Blu-ray + DVD

Powerhouse: Indicator

1966 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 134 min. / Street Date September 25, 2017 / Available from Amazon UK / £14.99

Starring: Marlon Brando, Jane Fonda, Robert Redford, E.G. Marshall,

Angie Dickinson, Janice Rule, Miriam Hopkins, Martha Hyer, Richard Bradford,

Robert Duvall, James Fox, Diana Hyland, Henry Hull, Jocelyn Brando, Clifton James, Steve Ihnat

Cinematography: Joseph Lashelle

Production Designer: Richard Day

Art Direction: Robert Luthardt

Film Editor: Gene Milford

Original Music: John Barry

Written by Lillian Hellman from the novel by Horton Foote

Produced by Sam Spiegel

Directed by Arthur Penn

Yes,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

The James Bond movies' special relationship with America

Mark Harrison Sep 19, 2017

Kingsman pulls the leg of the James Bond series - but how have the 007 films put across the relationship between Britain and the USA?

When Matthew Vaughn's Kingsman: The Secret Service exploded into cinemas in 2015, it gave the iconic James Bond franchise much the same irreverent treatment that the director's previous Mark Millar adaptation, Kick-Ass, gave to comic book movies. Reviews focused on how the film recontextualised the familiar 007 tropes of guns, girls and gadgets through the lens of class, identity and that notorious final bum note.

In the sequel, Eggsy and the Kingsmen run up against a crime syndicate known as the Golden Circle with a little help from their American cousins, the Statesmen. It neatly shows us that American iconography plays much the same role for their opposite numbers, that liquor-themed codenames will stand in for Arthurian monikers, and most accurately of all, that
See full article at Den of Geek »

Review: "Bank Shot" (1974) Starring George C. Scott; Kino Lorber Blu-ray Release

  • CinemaRetro
By Lee Pfeiffer

Few would argue that George C. Scott was one of the greatest actors of stage and screen. His presence in even a mediocre movie elevated its status considerably and his work as the nutty general in "Dr. Strangelove" was described by one critic as "the comic performance of the decade". When Scott won his well-deserved Oscar for Best Actor in "Patton" (which he famously refused), he seemed to be on a roll. His next film, the darkly satirical comedy "The Hospital" predicted the absurdities of America's for-profit health care system in which the rich and the poor were taken care of, with everyone else falling in between. The film earned Scott another Best Actor Oscar nomination despite his snubbing of the Academy the previous year. From that point, however, Scott's choice of film roles was wildly eclectic. There were some gems and plenty of misfires that leads
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Decoy aka Policewoman Decoy

Unsung actress Beverly Garland becomes TV’s first lady cop, in what’s claimed to be the first TV show filmed on the streets of New York City. This one-season wonder from 1957 has vintage locations, fairly tough-minded storylines and solid performances, from Bev and a vast gallery of stage and TV actors on the way up.

Decoy

(Policewoman Decoy)

TV Series

DVD

Film Chest Media

1957-’58 / B&W / 1:33 flat full frame (TV) / 39 x 30 min. / Street Date May 30, 2017 / 19.98

Starring: Beverly Garland

Art Direction (some episodes): Mel Bourne

Original Music: Wladimir Selinsky

Written by Lillian Andrews, Nicholas E. Baehr, Cy Chermak, Jerome Coopersmith, Don Ettlinger, Frances Frankel, Steven Gardner, Abram S. Ginnes, Mel Goldberg, Saul Levitt, Leon Tokatyan

Produced by Arthur H. Singer, David Alexander, Stuart Rosenberg, Everett Rosenthal

Directed by Teddy Sills, Stuart Rosenberg, David Alexander, Michael Gordon, Don Medford, Arthur H. Singer, Marc Daniels

How did I experience
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Movie News: 'The Man From U.N.C.L.E.' Sequel in the Works; Clifton James, James Bond's Southern Sheriff, Passes Away

  • Movies.com
The Man From U.N.C.L.E.: Armie Hammer, who starred in The Man From U.N.C.L.E., says that a script for a sequel is being written by Lionel Wigram, who produced and cowrote the original. As of yet, however, there is no official confirmation that Warner Bros. is funding or developing a sequel. [Slashfilm]   Clifton James: Perhaps best known for his role as Sheriff Pepper in the James Bond adventures Live and Let Die (above) and The Man With the Golden Gun (below), Clifton James enjoyed a long and varied career as an actor stretching over more than 50 years, making other memorable appearances in movies like Cool Hand Luke and Superman II. Now he has passed away, aged 96. [BBC]   Back Roads: Alex Pettyfer (Elvis & Nixon, above) will star in murder mystery...

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See full article at Movies.com »

News Briefs: 'The Man from U.N.C.L.E.' Sequel in the Works

  • Fandango
The Man from U.N.C.L.E.: Armie Hammer, who starred in The Man from U.N.C.L.E., says that a script for a sequel is being written by Lionel Wigram, who produced and cowrote the original. As of yet, however, there is no official confirmation that Warner Bros. is funding or developing a sequel. [Slashfilm]   Clifton James: Perhaps best known for his role as Sheriff Pepper in the James Bond adventures Live and Let Die (above) and The Man with the Golden Gun, Clifton James enjoyed a...

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Clifton James, Famed Character Actor And James Bond Veteran, Dead At 96

  • CinemaRetro
By Lee Pfeiffer

Clifton James, the respected character actor who rose to fame as the bumbling southern Sheriff J.W. Pepper in two James Bond films, has passed away at age 96. James, a decorated veteran of WWII, appeared in many prominent films and TV series. Among his feature films: "Cool Hand Luke", "The Bonfire of the Vanities", "The Untouchables", "Juggernaut", "The Last Detail", "Will Penny" and "Something Wild". The portly James often portrayed lawmen and judges. His most prominent role came in Roger Moore's 1973 debut film as James Bond, "Live and Let Die".  The character of Pepper as a comical racist lawman named Sheriff J.W. Pepper undoubtedly made audiences laugh. But to die-hard Bond fans his presence represented the increasing amount of slapstick that characterized some of Moore's Bond films. The producers brought the character back in the 1974 007 film "The Man with the Golden Gun" in which he coincidentally
See full article at CinemaRetro »

James Bond actor passes away

Veteran Hollywood actor Clifton James passed away yesterday, the 15th of April. He was 96 years old and is survived by his wife, five children, 14 grandchildren, four great grandchildren and his two sisters.

 

James was known for his role as a southern Sheriff J W Pepper in Bond movies such as Live and Let Die and The Man With The Golden Gun with Roger Moore. He was also known for essaying similar sheriff roles in notable films like Superman II and Silver Streak.

 

Rest in peace Clifton James.
See full article at Behindwoods »

Clifton James, actor who played Sheriff Jw Pepper in Bond films, dies at 96

Actor preferred stage work but role as redneck officer opposite Roger Moore in Live and Let Die led to a reprise in The Man with the Golden Gun

Clifton James, an actor who was best known for his indelible portrayal of a southern sheriff in two James Bond films but who was most proud of his work on the stage, has died. He was 96.

Related: Bond director Guy Hamilton: a career in clips

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Clifton James, Sheriff in James Bond Films, Dies at 96

Clifton James, Sheriff in James Bond Films, Dies at 96
Clifton James, best known for his indelible portrayal of a Southern sheriff in two James Bond films but who was most proud of his work on the stage, has died. He was 96.

His daughter, Lynn James, said the actor died Saturday at another daughter's home in Gladstone, Ore., due to complications from diabetes.

"He was the most outgoing person, beloved by everybody," Lynn James said. "I don't think the man had an enemy. We were incredibly blessed to have had him in our lives."

James often played a convincing Southerner but loved working on the stage in New York...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Clifton James Dies: James Bond, ‘Cool Hand Luke’ Actor Was 96

Clifton James, a longtime character recognizable from as a Southern sheriff type in films and TV shows from Cool Hand Luke and Dukes of Hazzard to a pair of James Bond movies, died today of complications from diabetes at 96. James’ death was reported by the Associated Press, with his daughter Lynn James confirming he died at another daughter’s home in Gladstone, Oregon. The actor played Sheriff J.W. Pepper in the Bond films Live and Let Die (1973) and The Man with the Gold…
See full article at Deadline TV »

Clifton James Dies: James Bond, ‘Cool Hand Luke’ Actor Was 96

  • Deadline
Clifton James Dies: James Bond, ‘Cool Hand Luke’ Actor Was 96
Clifton James, a longtime character recognizable from as a Southern sheriff type in films and TV shows from Cool Hand Luke and Dukes of Hazzard to a pair of James Bond movies, died today of complications from diabetes at 96. James’ death was reported by the Associated Press, with his daughter Lynn James confirming he died at another daughter’s home in Gladstone, Oregon. The actor played Sheriff J.W. Pepper in the Bond films Live and Let Die (1973) and The Man with the Gold…
See full article at Deadline »

Clifton James, Sheriff in James Bond Films, Dies at 96

Clifton James, Sheriff in James Bond Films, Dies at 96
​Clifton James, a veteran actor who appeared as Sheriff J.W. Pepper in two James Bond films, died Saturday morning at age 96.

James died just blocks away from his childhood home, surrounded by friends and family, loved ones told Variety in a statement.

Clifton was born in 1920, the eldest child of Grace and Harry James, and grew up just outside Portland, Oregon during the heart of the Great Depression.

According to relatives, he fought for five years on the front lines of the South Pacific, earning two Purple Hearts and a Silver Star for his service during World War II.

His acting career spanned nearly six decades, and included theater, film, and television. First appearing on stage in “The Time of Your Life,” he would go on to perform in several Broadway shows, including the Pulitzer Prize-winning drama “All The Way Home.”

James most famous role came on film. He
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Something Wild (1961)

Something Wild

Blu-ray

The Criterion Collection 850

1961 / B&W / 1:66 widescreen 1:37 flat Academy / 113 min. / available through The Criterion Collection / Street Date January 17, 2017 / 39.95

Starring: Carroll Baker, Ralph Meeker, Mildred Dunnock, Jean Stapleton, Martin Kosleck, Charles Watts, Clifton James, Doris Roberts, Anita Cooper, Tanya Lopert.

Cinematography: Eugen Schüfftan

Film Editor: Carl Lerner

Original Music: Aaron Copland

Written by Jack Garfein and Alex Karmel from his novel Mary Ann

Produced by George Justin

Directed by Jack Garfein

After writing up an earlier Mod disc release of the 1961 movie Something Wild, I received a brief but welcome email note from its director:

“Dear Glenn Erickson,

Thank you for your profound appreciation of Something Wild.

If possible, I would appreciate if you could send

me a copy of your review by email.

Sincerely yours, Jack Garfein

Somewhere back East (or in London), the Actors Studio legend Jack Garfein had found favor with the review. Although
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Veteran’s Day Tribute: The Ten Best Navy Movies

Veteran’s Day is November 11. While we all try to escape from the most exasperating Presidential Campaign in our history let me pay tribute to the Men and Women who have served in the military to insure we keep our electoral process and our freedoms.

Having served in the Navy four years (there he goes again!) I have a keen interest in any movie about the military, especially the sea service. I did serve during peace time so had no experience with combat but still spent most of my tour of duty at sea on an aircraft carrier, the USS Amerca CV66. Among other jobs I ran the ship’s television station for almost two years. Movies have always been important to me and so providing a few hours of entertainment every day when we were at sea was just about the best job I could have had.

The author
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

The Chase

Horton Foote, Lillian Hellman and Arthur Penn's All-Star vision of an Ugly America found few friends in 1965; now its overstated scenes of social injustice and violence are daily events. Marlon Brando leads a terrific cast -- Robert Redford, Jane Fonda, Angie Dickinson, Robert Duvall! -- to endure the worst Saturday ever to hit one cursed Texas township. The Chase (1966) Blu-ray Twilight Time 1966 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 134 min. / Street Date October 11, 2016 / Available from the Twilight Time Movies Store / 29.95 Starring Marlon Brando, Jane Fonda, Robert Redford, E.G. Marshall, Angie Dickinson, Janice Rule, Miriam Hopkins, Martha Hyer, Richard Bradford, Robert Duvall, James Fox, Diana Hyland, Henry Hull, Jocelyn Brando, Clifton James, Steve Ihnat Cinematography Joseph Lashelle Production Designer Richard Day Art Direction Robert Luthardt Film Editor Gene Milford Original Music John Barry Written by Lillian Hellman from the novel by Horton Foote Produced by Sam Spiegel Directed by Arthur Penn

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

The Laughing Policeman

In the early '70s Walter Matthau excelled in three powerful cops 'n' robbers movies; the second sees him as a tough, laconic San Francisco detective charged with an impossible task -- running down a machine gun mass murderer, with no clues and no living witnesses. The Laughing Policeman Blu-ray Kl Studio Classics 1973 / Color / 1:85 enhanced widescreen / 112 min. / Street Date October 18, 2016 / available through Kl Studio Classics / 29.95 Starring Walter Matthau, Bruce Dern, Louis Gossett Jr., Albert Paulsen, Anthony Zerbe, Val Avery, Cathy Lee Crosby, Mario Gallo, Joanna Cassidy, Shirley Ballard, William Hansen, Paul Koslo, Louis Guss, Clifton James, Gregory Sierra, Warren Finnerty, Matt Clark, Joseph Bernard, Leigh French, Anthony Costello. Cinematography David M. Walsh Film Editor Bob Wyman Original Music Charles Fox Written by Thomas Rickman from the novel by Maj Sjowall, Per Wahloo Produced and Directed by Stuart Rosenberg

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Viewers that like Walter Matthau in The Taking of Pelham One Two Three
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Doris Roberts -- Film Project in Jeopardy ... Cast Keeps Dying

  • TMZ
Doris Roberts' death is causing turmoil for a movie she was set to headline ... because she's the third big name attached to the flick who has died. One of the last movie roles Doris signed on for was the female lead in "Old Soldiers" ... which is still securing its last bit of financing before it starts production. Problem is ... 2 of the other major roles belonged to Mickey Rooney and James Best ... who died in 2014 and 2015 respectively.
See full article at TMZ »

The Last Detail

Jack Nicholson found his personal favorite role in this fine road picture: Navy signalman Buddusky, charged with escorting sad-sack prisoner Randy Quaid to prison. Hal Ashby's direction and Robert Towne's script pitches the story at the human scale favored by '70s director-driven filmmaking. The Last Detail Blu-ray Twilight Time Limited Edition 1973 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 104 min. / Ship Date January 19, 2016 / available through Twilight Time Movies / 29.95 Starring Jack Nicholson, Otis Young, Randy Quaid, Clifton James, Carol Kane, Michael Moriarty, Luana Anders, Kathleen Miller, Nancy Allen, Gerry Salsberg, Don McGovern, Pat Hamilton, Michael Chapman, Jim Henshaw, Derek McGrath, Gilda Radner, Jim Horn, John Castellano. Cinematography Michael Chapman Film Editor Robert C. Jones Original Music Johnny Mandel Written by Robert Towne from the novel by Darryl Ponicsan Produced by Gerald Ayres Directed by Hal Ashby

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Bring up the 'golden age' of director-driven movies in the 1970s and the
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Best James Bond Scenes: The Roger Moore era part 1: 1970s

  • SoundOnSight
It is no secret that Roger Moore holds the record as the actor who played James Bond the most, his tally an impressing 7. There are a bevy of reasons why this was the case, the most obvious being that each one of his films were massive financial successes, the only bump in the road being his second outing, The Man With the Golden Gun, which itself speaks to the immense stature of the franchise when the film that earns 97 million dollars is the ‘bump in the road.’ There was a shift in tone that permeated in the Bond films once Roger Moore took over the mantle from Sean Connery. Whereas the latter brought toughness and grittiness to his interpretation of the famous super spy all the while proving to be as smooth as butter, the former injected some light comedic flair. It was definitely still James Bond on the screen,
See full article at SoundOnSight »
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