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The week in TV: Alias Grace; Blue Planet II; Trust Me I’m a Doctor and more

Netflix’s Margaret Atwood adaptation is every bit as mighty as The Handmaid’s Tale. And David Attenborough’s oceanic survey is a gorgeous triumph

Alias Grace Netflix

Blue Planet II (BBC1) | iPlayer

Trust Me I’m a Doctor (BBC2) | iPlayer

Bounty Hunters Sky1

Man Down (C4) | All 4

Strike Back Sky1

Another month, another Margaret Atwood tale making it to the small screen and, if there’s any justice, getting us all talking, all enthralled, once again. Atwood has hardly been unacknowledged in the book world – Kazuo Ishiguro recently said she, not he, should have taken this year’s Nobel for literature – but it is surely splendid to see her work so richly and newly imagined.

Related: ‘Like running a marathon – with 100 sharks on your tail’: behind the scenes of Blue Planet II

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See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Five Things You Didn’t Know about Kazuo Ishiguro

Kazuo Ishiguro is a British writer who was born in Japan but moved with the rest of his family to England when he was still at the age of five. Primarily, he is famous for being a novelist, but it should be noted that he has written other things such as screenplays and short stories. Recently, Ishiguro has been in the news because he has won the Nobel Prize in Literature, thus cementing his status as one of the leading writers in the English-speaking world. Here are five things that you may or may not have known about Kazuo Ishiguro:

Five Things You Didn’t Know about Kazuo Ishiguro
See full article at TVovermind.com »

Nobel Peace Prize Awarded to Anti-Nuclear Weapons Group (Video)

  • The Wrap
Nobel Peace Prize Awarded to Anti-Nuclear Weapons Group (Video)
The 2017 Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons on Friday. In its explanation of the award the Nobel Committee said it was honoring the group’s “work to draw attention to the catastrophic humanitarian consequences of any use of nuclear weapons and for its ground-breaking efforts to achieve a treaty-based prohibition of such weapons.” It was a notably safe choice for the Nobel committee, coming in a year in which the nuclear ambitions of countries such as Iran and North Korea have dominated international news. Also Read: 'The Remains of the Day' Author Kazuo Ishiguro Wins Nobel.
See full article at The Wrap »

The confrontation by Anne-Katrin Titze

Benedict Andrews' Una star ‪Rooney Mara‬ on Ben Mendelsohn's Ray: "She can't take her eyes off of him." Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

Benedict Andrews' harrowing debut feature Una, screenplay by David Harrower, based on his play Blackbird (on Broadway with Michelle Williams and Jeff Daniels), stars Rooney Mara, Ben Mendelsohn and Ruby Stokes with Riz Ahmed and Tara Fitzgerald. The costumes are by Steven Noble (Danny Boyle's T2 Trainspotting, Jonathan Glazer's Under The Skin and Mark Romanek and Alex Garland's adaptation of Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro, winner of this year's Nobel Prize for Literature, announced today).

Una (as in either the one and only or the first of many) is a young woman (Rooney Mara) who as a teenager (played by Ruby Stokes) was the victim of a sex offender. A decade and a half after the trial that sent him, Ray (Ben Mendelsohn) to prison,
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

‘Remains of the Day’ Author Kazuo Ishiguro Wins Nobel Prize in Literature

‘Remains of the Day’ Author Kazuo Ishiguro Wins Nobel Prize in Literature
English novelist and screenwriter Kazuo Ishiguro has been awarded the 2017 Nobel Prize for Literature.

Ishiguro is best known for writing “The Remains of the Day” and “Never Let Me Go,” two acclaimed best-sellers that were later adapted for the screen. The prize committee in Sweden said Ishiguro’s works contained “great emotional force” that “uncovered the abyss beneath our illusory sense of connection with the world.”

The Nobel Prize is considered to be literature’s top honor. Past recipients include Toni Morrison, William Faulkner, Pablo Neruda, Gabriel García Márquez, and Ernest Hemingway. Last year’s honoree, Bob Dylan, was a controversial selection, because he was best known for his music, and because he opted not to attend the ceremony to pick up his prize in person.

Ishiguro’s most recent novel, 2015’s “The Buried Giant,” was a departure for him. It was set just after the fall of the Roman empire and involved mystical creatures. The
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘The Remains of the Day’ Author Kazuo Ishiguro Wins Nobel Prize for Literature

  • The Wrap
‘The Remains of the Day’ Author Kazuo Ishiguro Wins Nobel Prize for Literature
Kazuo Ishiguro, the Japanese-born British author of novels like “The Remains of the Day,” was awarded the Nobel Prize for literature on Thursday. In a statement on its website, the Nobel committee said that Kazuo’s work demonstrated “great emotional force” and “has uncovered the abyss beneath our illusory sense of connection with the world.” The 62-year-old is perhaps most famous for his 1990 novel “The Remains of the Day”– which was adapted into director James Ivory’s 1993 movie starring Anthony Hopkins and Emma Thompson that collected eight Oscar nominations. Also Read: Bob Dylan Did His Required Nobel Lecture - and Got His.
See full article at The Wrap »

Movie Review – Howards End: 25th Anniversary 4k Restoration (1992)

Howards End: 25th anniversary 4k restoration , 1992.

Directed by James Ivory.

Starring Emma Thompson, Anthony Hopkins, Helena Bonham Carter, Vanessa Redgrave, Samuel West, and Prunella Scales.

Synopsis:

Based on the novel by E M Forster, the story of three families. The Schlegels, two educated, politically minded sisters and their scholarly brother. The Wilcox family, headed by a wealthy businessman. And the Basts, she with a shady past and he constantly struggling to keep enough money coming into their down at heel home. They are all linked by the country house called Howards End.

In the late 80s and early 90s, the combination of producer Ishmael Merchant and director James Ivory could do no wrong. It had been a long haul – their company was founded in 1961 – but A Room With A View (1986) changed all that and they reached their peak with another E M Forster adaptation, Howards End (1992), followed swiftly by
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Every Book Emma Watson Has Ever Recommended

  • PEOPLE.com
A version of this article originally appeared on ew.com.

Emma Watson loves to read.

The actress has that in common with her brainy Harry Potter character Hermione as well as bookish Belle, who she plays in the much-anticipated film Beauty and the Beast, out March 17. In addition to being a bookworm, Watson is also an outspoken feminist and as well as a Un Women Goodwill Ambassador and promoter of the organization’s HeForShe movement, which is dedicated to recruiting men into the movement for gender equality. As a response to her work with the Un, she launched the feminist
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

The first trailer for Hulu’s The Handmaid’s Tale is here

  • HeyUGuys
Author: Jon Lyus

We’re due for a timely revisiting of a powerful vision of the future with Hulu’s big-budget TV series based on the 1985 novel The Handmaid’s Tale. The show stars Elisabeth Moss as Offred, and features a cast which includes Alexis Bledel, Samira Wiley, Joseph Fiennes, Yvonne Strahovski and Max Minghella.

Margaret Atwood’s novel imagines a war-torn future in which part of a fractured United States of America is a theocractic Republic named Gilead. Human sterility is a casualty of war, and in Gilead the subjugation of women is pillar on which its dictatorship is borne.

A movie adaptation of Atwood’s disturbing story made its way to the cinemas in 1990 with Volker Schlöndorff’s adaptation starring Natasha Richardon and Faye Dunaway. The film has aged less well than the novel, though Harold Pinter’s screenplay keeps up the unease and increasing urgency extremely well.
See full article at HeyUGuys »

‘Howards End’: Emma Thompson and James Ivory Reveal 5 Lessons Hollywood Should Learn From The Classic

‘Howards End’: Emma Thompson and James Ivory Reveal 5 Lessons Hollywood Should Learn From The Classic
Back when Sony released Rob Marshall’s overwrought and glossy $85-million flop “Memoirs of a Geisha,” I remember saying, “Merchant Ivory could have made a better version of this for $12 million.”

The production company founded by the late, great New York producer Ismail Merchant and James Ivory, his directing partner for 40 years, produced a remarkable collection of low-budget indie dramas from 1963 through 2005, the year Merchant died. Their films were so instantly recognizable that “Merchant Ivory” became not only a brand but also a description of an art film genre often identified in ads with ivy trellises.

Cohen Media recently acquired (with some difficulty) the rights to most of their library (21 films, 10 shorts and several documentaries). New York cinephile and real estate mogul Charles Cohen said he acquired the Merchant Ivory brand “to raise the profile in the minds of a new audience and remind older audiences of the high quality films Merchant Ivory embodied.
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

‘Howards End’: Emma Thompson and James Ivory Reveal 5 Lessons Hollywood Should Learn From The Classic

  • Indiewire
‘Howards End’: Emma Thompson and James Ivory Reveal 5 Lessons Hollywood Should Learn From The Classic
Back when Sony released Rob Marshall’s overwrought and glossy $85-million flop “Memoirs of a Geisha,” I remember saying, “Merchant Ivory could have made a better version of this for $12 million.”

The production company founded by the late, great New York producer Ismail Merchant and James Ivory, his directing partner for 40 years, produced a remarkable collection of low-budget indie dramas from 1963 through 2005, the year Merchant died. Their films were so instantly recognizable that “Merchant Ivory” became not only a brand but also a description of an art film genre often identified in ads with ivy trellises.

Cohen Media recently acquired (with some difficulty) the rights to most of their library (21 films, 10 shorts and several documentaries). New York cinephile and real estate mogul Charles Cohen said he acquired the Merchant Ivory brand “to raise the profile in the minds of a new audience and remind older audiences of the high quality films Merchant Ivory embodied.
See full article at Indiewire »

Dangerous Visions: new sci-fi season launches on BBC Radio 4

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A heads-up for sci-fi fans. BBC Radio 4’s Dangerous Visions season is back for 3 weeks, starting this Sunday the 22nd of May…

Since Buck Rogers hit the airwaves in 1930s America and Orson Welles put the willies up listeners with his chill retelling of The War Of The Worlds, radio has long been a friend to science-fiction.

Happily, BBC Radio 4 continues that fine tradition with a new season of sci-fi programming over the next few weeks, including new commissions as well as dramatisations and readings of work by Aldous Huxley, John Wyndham and Kazuo Ishiguro.

Dangerous Visions, so named for the celebrated 1960s Harlan Ellison-edited sci-fi anthology, returns on Sunday the 22nd of May with Huxley’s Brave New World, with Anton Lesser. Then it’s an invasion classic with a dramatisation of Wyndham’s The Kraken Wakes featuring Tamsin Grieg, with versions of William Morris' News From Nowhere,
See full article at Den of Geek »

Evolution review – an amphibious dystopia between nightmare and reverie

In Lucile Hadžihalilović’s diverting fantasy, boys are implanted with foetuses, but the film never quite achieves the body horror or eroticism it seems to aim for

Lucile Hadžihalilović’s Evolution swarms and ripples across the movie screen: a weird stingless jellyfish of a film. It drifts through an amphibious world of its own, somewhere between nightmare and reverie: intriguing, but never quite arriving at that pure jab of fear or eroticism or body horror that it appears to be swimming towards. The action takes place on an island of the dystopian future or alternative-fantasy present, in which a race of young boys are tended to by expressionless, eyebrowless, white-clad nurses. Human reproduction is different here: it is the boys who must bear the foetuses, which are implanted by surgery, and there are no adult males – indicating a future of sacrificial obsolescence for these youngsters. Maybe this is how humanity has evolved or is evolving,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Guy Maddin on his surreal seances and sexploitation remakes

His new film, The Forbidden Room, features amnesiac chanteuses, a jungle vampire and tormented buttock obsessives. So business as usual, then, for the cult auteur

Apart from the fact that the action begins underwater – in a submarine facing certain doom – Guy Maddin’s The Forbidden Room is something of an underground movie. All the Canadian director’s films are, in a sense. They’re made beyond the mainstream of art cinema, usually on scrimp-and-save budgets, and display the exalted amateur obsessiveness that marks the true outsider film-maker. And Maddin’s work has another quintessentially underground quality: the sense that he’s mining the unconscious not only of his perverse psyche but of cinema itself.

The Forbidden Room is the culmination of the 59-year-old’s 30-year career that began when Maddin would make eerie pastiches of silent-era cinema in his mother’s old hair salon, part of his family’s Winnipeg home.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Overthinking an Excerpt from Star Wars: Aftermath

  • Boomtron
I’m not too into looking at excerpts – though sometimes I make exceptions – mostly because I get enough galleys/Arc’s to fulfill any desire — that I don’t even really have anyway — of checking out things that I want early to really even keep up with excerpt releases, much less read them.

Update: Check out my review of Star Wars Aftermath — and don’t forget to read about the actual good parts of it.

It was the reaction to the world’s first look at Star Wars: Aftermath that made me check it, though I’m not sure why because I’ve given up on honest or at least fruitful immediate reaction, especially when it concerns writing.

People who don’t write think they can with time, and many people who do have the time and write, still can’t. Typically people who have the time to respond
See full article at Boomtron »

Wedge and Rae Sloane in Star Wars: Aftermath Excerpt – Random Thoughts

  • Boomtron
I’m not too into looking at excerpts though sometimes I make exceptions mostly because I get enough galleys/Arc’s to fulfill any desire – that I don’t even really have anyway – of checking out things that I want early to really even keep up with excerpt releases, much less read them.

It was the reaction to the world’s first look at Star Wars: Aftermath that made me check it, though I’m not sure why because I’ve given up on honest or at least fruitful immediate reaction, especially when it concerns writing.

People who don’t write think they can with time, and many people who do have the time and write, still can’t. Typically people who have the time to respond several times over the course of an Entertainment Weekly piece about writing, where an excerpt from Star Wars: Aftermath made its way online,
See full article at Boomtron »

Alex Garland Talks His "Annihilation" Prep

Hot off the success of this year's thought-provoking sci-fi drama "Ex Machina," filmmaker Alex Garland is prepping his next project - a film adaptation of Jeff VanderMeer's acclaimed 2014 novel "Annihilation".

The story follows four people - a biologist, an anthropologist, a psychologist, and a surveyor - who set out on an expedition into 'Area X,' the twelfth such expedition into the mysterious, uninhabited and abandoned area that nature has begun to reclaim. Previous expeditions have been disastrous - fraught with disappearances, suicides, aggressive cancers, and mental trauma.

That book, which won the 2014 Nebula award and the 2014 Shirley Jackson Award for best novel, is the first in a trilogy. Out doing press for the DVD/Blu-ray release of "Ex Machina," Garland spoke with io9 about the progress of his film version and says he's deep in pre-production:

"That's my day job at the moment. Early on this week, I was on a location recce.
See full article at Dark Horizons »

Exclusive Interview: Alex Garland Talks Ex Machina

The science-fiction genre can be a hard one to embrace. As screenwriter and director Alex Garland can teach us, it is more important for the characters and ideas to resonate with the audience than the groundbreaking visual effects. Garland wrote a variety of acclaimed sci-fi films, including the zombie thriller 28 Days Later, the Kazuo Ishiguro adaptation Never Let Me Go and recent cult favorite Dredd. In all of those titles, plus his newest film – the brainy sci-fi thriller, Ex Machina – the characters trump the concept.

Ex Machina has been one of the year’s biggest art-house successes, after two weeks in limited release. It tells the story of Caleb (Domhnall Gleeson), a tech programmer who gets the chance to test out the new work of reclusive genius and company figurehead Nathan (Oscar Isaac). That new creation is a female A.I. named Ava (Alicia Vikander), which soon proves to be more than it seems.
See full article at We Got This Covered »

My favourite Cannes winner: Pulp Fiction

In a new series ahead of this year’s Cannes film festival, our writers choose their favourite Palme d’Or winner. Today: Peter Bradshaw on Quentin Tarantino’s 1994 classic

I — say — God — Damn!

The intravenous jab of callous madness, black comedy and strange unwholesome euphoria in Quentin Tarantino’s Pulp Fiction hits me as hard now as when I first saw it 20 years ago. I sometimes think this is what it must have been like for record-buyers when Elvis Presley’s Heartbreak Hotel was released. It all first broke out at the Grand Théâtre Lumière at the Cannes film festival in 1994: Pulp Fiction was in competition, up against world cinema’s heavy-hitters: Nikita Mikhalkov’s Burnt By the Sun, Nanni Moretti’s Caro Diario, Edward Yang’s Confucian Confusion, and perhaps most prominently Krzysztof Kieslowski’s Three Colours Red — widely tipped for the Palme D’Or. The jury president
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »
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