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Night People

Nunnally Johnson hands us a well-written spy & hostage drama set in Cold War Berlin, with plenty of intrigue and good humor to boot. Gregory Peck is the troubled negotiator and Broderick Crawford a Yankee galoot sticking his nose where it isn’t wanted. This one has been out of reach for quite a while — and it works up some fun suspense.

Night People

Blu-ray

Kl Studio Classics

1954 / Color / 2:55 widescreen / 93 min. / Street Date July 25, 2017 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95

Starring: Gregory Peck, Broderick Crawford, Anita Björk, Rita Gam, Walter Abel, Buddy Ebsen, Max Showalter, Jill Esmond, Peter van Eyck, Marianne Koch, Hugh McDermott, Paul Carpenter, Lionel Murton, Ottow Reichow.

Cinematography: Charles G. Clarke

Film Editor: Dorothy Spencer

Original Music: Cyril Mockridge

Story by Jed Harris, Tom Reed

Associate Producer Gerd Oswald

Written, Directed and Produced by Nunnally Johnson

An intelligent cold war thriller about distrust and passive aggression across the East-West divide in Berlin,
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Seven Anti-James Bond Movies You Haven’t Seen

  • SoundOnSight
The Bond franchise which has been with us so long, has become so deeply entrenched in popular culture, that we often forget what it was that first distinguished the Bonds a half-century ago. Skyfall might be one of the best of the Bonds, and even, arguably, one of the best big-budget big-action flicks to come along in quite a while, but it’s not alone. The annual box office is – and has been, for quite some time – dominated by big, action-packed blockbusters of one sort of another. The Bonds aren’t even the only action-driven spy flicks (Mr. James Bond, I’d like you to meet Mr. Jason Bourne and Mr. Ethan Hunt).

That’s not to take anything away from the superb entertainment Skyfall is, or the sentimentally treasured place the Bonds hold. It’s only to say that where there was once just the one, there are now many.
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Elaine Stritch, Broadway Legend, Dies At 89

Elaine Stritch, the legendary Broadway actress and singer, died on Thursday at her Michigan home. She was 89.

Elaine Strich Dies

Stritch’s passing was confirmed by her friend Julie Keyes to The New York Times.

Stritch, a Detroit native, made her Broadway debut in 1946 in Jed Harris’ comedy Loco. She went on to earn Tony nominations for her inspired work in William Inge’s Bus Stop (1955), Noel Coward’s Sail Away (1961), Stephen Sondheim’s Company (1970), in which she sang one of her most enduring numbers – “The Ladies Who Lunch,” and Edward Albee play A Delicate Balance (1996). Stritch finally took home a Tony for her one-woman show Elaine Stritch at Liberty in 2001.

On the small screen, Stritch more recently appeared on Tina Fey’s 30 Rock, on which she played Jack Donaghy’s (Alec Baldwin) mother Colleen. Her recurring guest appearances earned her an Emmy in 2008. Stritch previously won Emmys for a
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Seven Anti-007 Movies You Haven’t Seen

  • SoundOnSight
(*My apologies for this coming so long after Sound on Sight’s celebration of 50 years of James Bond, but I’ve been swamped with end-of-semester work and only just now managed to finish this. Hope you all still find this of interest.)

As a coda to the Sos’s James Bond salute, there’s still a point I think deserves to be made.

The Bond franchise which has been with us so long, has become so deeply entrenched in popular culture, that we often forget what it was that first distinguished the Bonds a half-century ago. Skyfall might be one of the best of the Bonds, and even, arguably, one of the best big-budget big-action flicks to come along in quite a while, but it’s not alone. The annual box office is – and has been, for quite some time – dominated by big, action-packed blockbusters of one sort of another.
See full article at SoundOnSight »

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