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‘What We Do in the Shadows’ TV Series: Beanie Feldstein, Doug Jones, and More Join Taika Waititi’s FX Comedy

‘What We Do in the Shadows’ TV Series: Beanie Feldstein, Doug Jones, and More Join Taika Waititi’s FX Comedy
Taika Waititi and Jemaine Clement’s “What We Do in the Shadows” television series is going to be in some very funny hands. Not only are the creators and stars of the cult favorite comedy film going to be involved behind the scenes (Waititi is directing, Clement is writing), but the cast in front of the camera is shaping up to be a winner. Variety confirms that “Lady Bird” breakout Beanie Feldstein and Guillermo del Toro’s go-to creature actor Doug Jones are joining the cast.

Feldstein was nominated for the Screen Actors Guild Award for Best Ensemble as part of the cast of “Lady Bird,” where she earned rave reviews as the central character’s best friend Julie. She previously starred in a supporting role in “Neighbors 2: Sorority Rising.” Jones has worked with del Toro numerous times, playing creates in “The Shape of Water,” “Hellboy,” and “Pan’s Labyrinth.
See full article at Indiewire »

“Advocating For the Civil Rights of Women”: Editor Kate Hackett on Half the Picture

The title of Amy Adrion’s Half the Picture should be taken semi-literally: if women are half the population but severely underrepresented behind the camera, what’s being lost? Her documentary interviews a number of female directors (including Gina Prince-Blythewood, Catherine Hardwicke and Penelope Spheeris) on their experiences, good and bad, while (not) making movies. Editor Kate Hackett explained her work on the film and why she found it inspiring prior to the film’s premiere. Filmmaker: How and why did you wind up being the editor of your film? What were the factors and attributes that led to your being hired for this job? Hackett: I […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

Film News Roundup: Juno Films Buys Chilean Night-Sky Documentary ‘Cielo’

In today’s film news roundup, Juno Films buys “Cielo,” Sally Kirkland comes out against a new tipping policy, and Film Independent selects its Directors Lab participants.

Acquisition

Juno Films has acquired all U.S. rights for Cielo, the night-sky feature documentary directed and produced by Canadian filmmaker Alison McAlpine through Second Sight Pictures.

“Cielo,” co-produced with Paola Castillo of Errante Producciones, premiered at the New York Film Festival. “Cielo” will be shown at other film festivals, leading to a summer theatrical release. The documentary explores the beauty of the night sky, as experienced in the Atacama Desert in Chile — regarded as one of the best places on the planet to study the sky.

“‘Cielo’ caught my eye and then my breath,” Juno Films founder Elizabeth Sheldon said. “It is a cinematic mediation on the stars for anyone who has gazed at the night sky and contemplated the heavens.”

Sheldon negotiated the U.S. deal with
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Female Filmmakers Dominated the Sundance Awards, But That Doesn’t Guarantee a Career Boost

Female Filmmakers Dominated the Sundance Awards, But That Doesn’t Guarantee a Career Boost
At this year’s Sundance Film Festival, the annual event broke some of its own barriers, doling out each of its four directing awards to female filmmakers. For the first time in the festival’s 34-year history, directing prizes went only to women, spanning all four major categories — narrative and documentary, U.S. and world cinema: Sara Colangelo (“The Kindergarten Teacher”), Alexandria Bombach (“On Her Shoulders”), Sandi Tan (“Shirkers”), and Isold Uggadottir (“And Breathe Normally”). The festival’s juries also awarded Desiree Akhavan’s “The Miseducation of Cameron Post” the Grand Jury Prize, the festival’s highest honor; Sundance’s sole dedicated screenplay honor, the Waldo Salt Screenwriting Award, went to Christina Choe for “Nancy.”

In short, it was a big festival for women. But what does winning an award at Sundance actually mean for female filmmakers? How does it impact future projects? Does it guarantee further success in the industry?
See full article at Indiewire »

Sundance Veterans Taika Waititi, Justin Lin, and Catherine Hardwicke Talk Diversity and Directing Tentpoles — Watch

Three directors who have had a film surpass $340 million at the worldwide box office revisited how Sundance launched their careers. On January 26, “Power of Story: Indies Go Hollywood,” brought together Taika Waititi (“Thor: Ragnarock”), Justin Lin (“Star Trek: Beyond”), and Catherine Hardwicke (“Twilight”) to discuss the challenges of adjusting to the studio system, their desire for the industry to be more inclusive, and how to keep their stories personal when they’re part of a juggernaut franchise.

Read More:Sundance 2018 Deals: The Complete List of Festival Purchases So Far

Waititi, a New Zealander, has premiered four pictures in Park City: “Eagle vs Shark” (2007), “Boy” (2010), “Hunt for the Wilderpeople”(2016), and “What We Do in the Shadows” (2014), which is now being adapted for television. Taiwan-born Lin — a veteran of four “The Fast and the Furious” sequels (with more to come) — has attended the festival as a buyer and seller: his features “Better Luck Tomorrow
See full article at Indiewire »

Annapurna Lands ‘Sorry to Bother You’ for Seven Figures — Sundance 2018

Musician Boots Riley’s first foray into cinema, “Sorry to Bother You, ” sold to Annapurna Pictures at Sundance for a reported seven figures. The comedy/sci-fi/magical-realism hybrid premiered in Park City on January 20 as part of the festival’s U.S. Dramatic Competition. “Get Out” actor Lakeith Stanfield plays Cassius Green, a black telemarketer from Oakland who realizes that it’s more lucrative for him make his voice sound like a white person’s.

Read More:Sundance 2018 Deals: The Complete List of Festival Purchases So Far

In his B+ review, IndieWire’s Eric Kohn praised the “whip-smart satire of racial dynamics in the workplace,” which “leaves you with the impression that even the most ridiculous moments contain some tidbits of truth.” Numerous bidders were said to vie for the film’s worldwide rights. Academy Award winner Forest Whitaker (“The Last King of Scotland”) is among the producers (his Significant Productions also backed “Fruitvale Station,
See full article at Indiewire »

Gina Rodriguez: The Lack of Latino Representation Onscreen Is ‘Heartbreaking and Dehumanizing’

Gina Rodriguez: The Lack of Latino Representation Onscreen Is ‘Heartbreaking and Dehumanizing’
Gina Rodriguez has written an open letter in Variety condemning Hollywood for the lack of Latino representation in front of and behind the camera in film and television. The letter arrives following this year’s Oscar nominations, which did not include a single Latino actor or actress in the four performance categories. Rodriguez tweeted the following quote from Viola Davis following the nominations on January 23: “The only thing that separates women of color from anyone else is opportunity.”

Read More:‘Jane The Virgin’ Star Gina Rodriguez on Advocacy and Supporting Women in This New Age

“To be seen and heard is a simple human need. To be invisible in a world of loud voices is heartbreaking and dehumanizing,” Rodriguez writes in Variety. “The under-representation of Latinos in Hollywood both on and off screen is not just a feeling; it’s a sad reality…Latinos are not only prominent and
See full article at Indiewire »

Horizon Award winners unveiled at Sundance 2018

Giselle Bonilla and Benita Ozoude prevail in pool of 380-plus submissions.

Source: Horizon Award

Horizon Award co-founders Cassian Elwes, Lynette Howell Taylor, and Christine Vachon on Saturday (January 20) announced the winners of the fourth annual Horizon Awards in Park City.

Giselle Bonilla (pictured second from left) and Benita Ozoude (pictured third from left) were announced as the winners for their short films of two minutes or less. The awards received a record 380-plus submissions from 275 films schools worldwide.

Bonilla (New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts) directed her short Virgencita about a woman who confesses her desire to abort a probable pregnancy.

University of Texas at Austin graduate Ozoude’s short Queen Of Rosewood centres on a Cajun food restaurant owner from East Austin who devotes her spare time to feeding the homeless.

Elwes (pictured far left), Howell Taylor (pictured third from right), and Vachon joined Sundance Feature Film Program founding director Michelle Satter to choose
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Fox 2000 Promotes Pair Of Executives

Fox 2000 has promoted Nikki Ramey to VP Production and Molly Saffron to director of development, elevating the pair who have been at the 20th Century Fox film label for almost six years. Ramey, who joined as an assistant after working for Catherine Hardwicke, most recently worked on The Mountain Between Us, Joy and The Longest Ride. She is currently developing News of the World from Playtone and Gail Mutrux, the Veronica Roth adaptation Inertia and the Working Title…
See full article at Deadline »

17 Highest-Grossing Movies Directed by Women, From ‘Mamma Mia!’ to ‘Wonder Woman’ (Photos)

  • The Wrap
17 Highest-Grossing Movies Directed by Women, From ‘Mamma Mia!’ to ‘Wonder Woman’ (Photos)
Take a look at which films directed by women are on this list, unadjusted for inflation. 1. “Frozen” (2013) Directors: Jennifer Lee, Chris Buck Domestic gross: $400.7 million 2. “Wonder Woman” (2017) Director: Patty Jenkins Domestic gross: $285.3 million 3. “Shrek” (2001) Directors: Vicky Jenson, Andrew Adamson Domestic gross: $267.7 million 4. Brave” (2012”) Directors: Mark Andrews, Brenda Chapman Domestic gross: $237.3 million 5. “Alvin And The Chipmunks: The Squeakquel” (2009) Director: Betty Thomas Domestic gross: $219.6 million 6. “Twilight” (2008) Director: Catherine Hardwicke Domestic gross: $192.8 million 7. “Pitch Perfect 2” (2015) Director: Elizabeth Banks Domestic gross: $183.8 million 8. “What Women Want” (2000) Director: Nancy Meyers Domestic gross: $182.8 million 9. “Fifty Shades of Grey” (2015) Director: Sam Taylor-Johnson Domestic gross: $166.1 million 10. “Kung...
See full article at The Wrap »

‘Allure’ Trailer: Evan Rachel Wood Seduces a Girl Way Too Young for Her in Twisted Lesbian Drama

‘Allure’ Trailer: Evan Rachel Wood Seduces a Girl Way Too Young for Her in Twisted Lesbian Drama
From her early breakout in Catherine Hardwicke’s “Thirteen,” to a recent television comeback on HBO’s “Westworld,” Evan Rachel Wood has built her career out of complicated roles and dark projects. Leading a taut directorial debut from Montreal-based photographers Carlos and Jason Sanchez, Wood takes “troubled” to a whole new level. The newly released first trailer teases plenty of Wood at her manipulative best, serving up goth chic with a side of crazy eyes.

Read More:‘A Worthy Companion’ Review: Evan Rachel Wood Is a Manipulative Lesbian With a Mommy Complex in This Taut Debut — Tiff

Previously titled “A Worthy Companion” for its Toronto International Film Festival premiere, “Allure” follows disturbed Laura (Wood) as she befriends and seduces the 16-year-old Eva (Julia Sarah Stone). Adrift and flailing, Laura works for a cleaning service run by her estranged father (Denis O’Hare). Their relationship is mysteriously fraught, and Laura goes
See full article at Indiewire »

Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Ava DuVernay, Taika Waititi Heading to 2018 Sundance Film Festival

  • The Wrap
Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Ava DuVernay, Issa Rae, Catherine Hardwicke and Taika Waititi are heading to the 2018 Sundance Film Festival to discuss their work and the power of media, it was announced Thursday. DuVernay, Patrick Gaspard, Rae, Megan Smith and Christine Vachon will speak on a panel titled “Power of Story: Culture Shift” to talk about their work as well as the role of creative choices in our ever-shifting culture. The conversation will be led by Washington Post journalist Sarah Ellison on Jan. 19. Hardwicke, Waititi and Justin Lin will talk about the advantages and challenges of moving...
See full article at The Wrap »

Gina Rodriguez Signs With CAA (Exclusive)

Gina Rodriguez Signs With CAA (Exclusive)
Gina Rodriguez has signed with CAA, The Hollywood Reporter has exclusively learned.

The Jane the Virgin star won a Golden Globe for best TV comedy actress in 2015 for her breakout performance in The CW series' first season, then received two more nominations in subsequent years. She'll next be seen opposite Natalie Portman and Tessa Thompson in Alex Garland's Annihilation, which Paramount will release Feb. 23. After that she'll star in Sony's adaptation of the 2011 Mexican thriller Miss Bala, directed by Catherine Hardwicke.

Through her CBS TV Studios-based I Can and I Will Productions (named...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Gina Rodriguez Signs With CAA (Exclusive)

Gina Rodriguez has signed with CAA, The Hollywood Reporter has exclusively learned.

The Jane the Virgin star won a Golden Globe for best TV comedy actress in 2015 for her breakout performance in The CW series' first season, then received two more nominations in subsequent years. She'll next be seen opposite Natalie Portman and Tessa Thompson in Alex Garland's Annihilation, which Paramount will release Feb. 23. After that she'll star in Sony's adaptation of the 2011 Mexican thriller Miss Bala, directed by Catherine Hardwicke.

Through her CBS TV Studios-based I Can and I Will Productions (named...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - TV News »

“Pitch Perfect” Franchise Has Grossed Over Half a Billion Worldwide

“Pitch Perfect 3”

The Barden Bellas have sung their way past a major milestone. The “Pitch Perfect” franchise has now grossed more than $500 million worldwide, Deadline reports. We’d say half a billion dollars calls for a celebratory rendition of “Cups.” The third installment of the Anna Kendrick-led series dropped in U.S. theaters December 22.

Pitch Perfect 3” has earned over $98 million worldwide so far, and while it doesn’t seem destined to be a huge box office success — especially compared to the first two films — it’s far from a flop. With a budget of $45 million (excluding print and advertising), the latest, and supposedly final, chapter of the aca-saga is doing perfectly respectable numbers.

The original “Pitch Perfect” earned over $115 million worldwide and the sequel took in over $287 million, with respective budgets of $17 and $29 million (again, before print and advertising costs were factored in). They struck box office gold,
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Guest Post: What It’s Like to Be a Fiercely Independent Woman Film Fest Director in the Trenches

Meira Blaustein

Guest Post by Meira Blaustein

When I co-founded the Woodstock Film Festival 18 years ago I had no sense of how hard the work would be, and how immense the positive influence on so many people, near and far, it would have. When you are deep in the process of developing something that requires you to give your all, you can’t always see what’s happening outside of your immediate vision.

Eighteen years after the festival first began as a fiercely independent, artistically driven event, I can look around and see the thousands of lives that it has affected and helped: young high school students and college interns who were inspired by the festival and have gone on to successful careers in film and media, such as Amanda Warman Naseem, who started out as an assistant at the festival and today is one of the top producers at Vice; emerging filmmakers who have developed into accomplished artists in their fields, such as Leah Meyerhoff, who screened her short film “Twitch” at the festival back in 2005, and today is a feature film director who also heads the internationally known grassroots women filmmakers organization Film Fatales; community members who have discovered new passion for the power of the arts such as Jen Dragon, who was a volunteer at the festival and now runs a highly successful art gallery.

Seeing countless stories like this makes the hard work and dedication worthwhile. I suppose it’s like giving birth each year — a long and hard pregnancy period ending with a beautiful baby that gives you the courage and the energy to do it all over again.

As a woman working in a male-dominated industry, I recognize that there is much work left to do. Each year as I program the fest’s film lineup, put together the panels, and select the special honorees, I find myself looking for a gender balance that is not always easy to achieve. As such I’m proud that we have developed an official Spotlight on Women in Film and Media whereby we highlight annually the works by some of the year’s most talented and courageous women filmmakers.

This year we are showing 54 feature films, and 19 are directed by women, which puts us at a higher percentage than most festivals. Moreover, we have made a conscious effort in our programming to pay attention to issues affecting women, as well as films featuring outstanding female actors. Among the female-directed films showing this year are first-time director Lillian Lasalle’s “My Name is Pedro,” filled with engrossing twists and inspirational lessons, Hope Litoff’s “32 Pills: My Sister’s Suicide,” which explores the life and death of her artist sister, and Catherine Eaton’s “The Sounding,” a narrative of a woman’s struggle to maintain her independence and find her own unique voice, also written and acted by Eaton.

The 2017 Spotlight on Women in Film and Media includes titles such as “Bombshell: The Hedy Lamarr Story,” “La Chana,” and “This is Everything: Gigi Gorgeous.”

This year’s honorary Maverick Award, given for her outstanding artistry in acting and her long-standing commitment to the support of issue-driven films as a producer, will be presented to Susan Sarandon. In the past we have honored documentarian Barbara Kopple, producer Christine Vachon, director Mira Nair, and actor Ellen Barkin. In talks and events we have featured Vera Farmiga, Melissa Leo, Lucy Liu, Kyra Sedgwick, Patricia Clarkson, Parker Posey, Uma Thurman, Catherine Hardwicke, Debra Granik, Susan Seidelman, Katherine Dieckmann, Rebecca Miller, and countless others.

So while it is still a challenge to create gender balance, I’m glad that we can do our small part in tipping the scale towards equality. The more that festivals like ours offer opportunities to showcase and celebrate the outstanding works by women filmmakers, the higher the chances that those keepers of the gate in the financing and distribution universe will open their purse and greenlight female-directed projects.

The 18th annual Woodstock Film Festival runs from October 11–15. To download a pre-fest program of this year’s event click here.

Meira Blaustein is an arts entrepreneur with over 20 years of experience developing film organizations, entertainment, arts, and media events in the U.S. and globally. Blaustein is the Co-founder, Executive Director, and Head Programmer of the Woodstock Film Festival (Wff). Wff was launched in 2000 and has become one of the most respected and influential regional film festivals in the USA. Blaustein has been running it ever since its inception. As an international consultant Blaustein also co-founded and developed the Cabo International Film Festival in Cabo San Lucas, Mexico. The festival developed into what is now the Baja International Film Festival. A filmmaker by training, Blaustein directed, produced, and consulted on numerous feature films in various stages, from development to marketing.

https://medium.com/media/62855bd791697227565ff98d71f68339/href

Guest Post: What It’s Like to Be a Fiercely Independent Woman Film Fest Director in the Trenches was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Initiatives Targeted at Boosting Women in Hollywood Thrive, But Can They Close Gender Gap?

Initiatives Targeted at Boosting Women in Hollywood Thrive, But Can They Close Gender Gap?
While it’s not a great time to be a woman entrenched in the Hollywood system, it is a good time to be an up-and-coming female director, writer, producer or even cinematographer trying to get her foot inside entertainment’s heavy doors.

Just look at the past several months. In June, Ava DuVernay announced that all the episodes in the second season of her series “Queen Sugar” (Own) would, as in the first season, be directed by women. In July, the Toronto Intl. Film Festival kicked off a $3 million campaign to support female filmmakers and Sundance Institute launched Catalyst Women, to connect film financiers with women artists behind Sundance Institute-supported features and documentaries. NBC followed those initiatives with Female Forward, focused on female directors among scripted series across the Peacock network.

Spearheaded by NBC president Jennifer Salke in partnership with director Lesli Linka Glatter, Female Forward will give 10 women directors the opportunity to shadow on up to
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Wonder Woman’ Director Patty Jenkins on Equal Pay, Hollywood Sexism and James Cameron’s Nasty Words

‘Wonder Woman’ Director Patty Jenkins on Equal Pay, Hollywood Sexism and James Cameron’s Nasty Words
Much like a certain Amazon goddess with a lasso, there are no heights that director Patty Jenkins can’t scale. Her blockbuster “Wonder Woman,” which has grossed a staggering $821 million worldwide since it opened in the summer, has become a rallying call for women everywhere and a beacon of empowerment in a Donald Trump-led world. Beyond all the Instagram posts of little girls decked out in “Ww” regalia while seeing the film and an endorsement from Hillary Clinton, Jenkins recently cracked another glass ceiling. She’ll be directing “Wonder Woman 2” for a reported $7 million to $9 million, a record salary for a female filmmaker.

As she negotiated the terms of her contract with Warner Bros. over several months, Jenkins was conscious of what earning a big paycheck would mean. “You’re of course aware of the money,” says Jenkins on a sunny afternoon in Los Angeles. “But I’ve never been more aware of a duty
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Telluride Horror Show 2017’s Second Wave of Programming Includes Psychopaths, Tragedy Girls, and More

  • DailyDead
Following their exciting first wave of announcements, the Telluride Horror Show has revealed its second slate of films, and they are definitely a worthy follow-up to the first wave, with the anticipated titles including Mickey Keating's Psychopaths, Tyler MacIntyre's Tragedy Girls, and many more:

Press Release: The highly anticipated second wave of films and guests, as well as special events and schedule, has been announced for the 2017 Telluride Horror Show, which will kick off on Friday the 13th of October and run through October 15th in picturesque Telluride, Colorado.

The second wave includes the World Premieres of Derelicts and Never Hike Alone (a fan tribute to Friday The 13th), as well as the U.S. Premiere of Borley Rectory and Colorado Premieres of Tragedy Girls, Desolation, Cold Hell, and Psychopaths. Fourteen additional short films have been included.

More guests have been confirmed, including directors Greg McLean (Jungle), Patrick Brice
See full article at DailyDead »

Tiff 2017 Women Directors: Meet Molly McGlynn — “Mary Goes Round”

Mary Goes Round

Molly McGlynn is a Canadian writer and director. Her previous short films include “I Am Not a Weird Person,” “Shoes,” and “3-Way (Not Calling).” “Mary Goes Round” is her first feature film. In 2015, she was selected as a Talent Lab Resident at the Reykjavik International Film Festival and as a Samsung Tiff Emerging Director.

Mary Goes Round” will premiere at the 2017 Toronto International Film Festival on September 9.

W&H: Describe the film for us in your own words.

Mm: “Mary Goes Round” is largely about overcoming alienation, both personal and familial, and the relief that comes with the acceptance. The film centers around a substance abuse counselor who returns to her childhood home after a DUI to meet her half-sister but learns that her estranged father is dying of cancer.

It’s about a woman who is forced to take care of a parent who she thinks let her down while simultaneously dealing with her personal demons for the sake of a teenage girl.

In the end, it’s about acts of love and taking care — not in the inane, vague email sign-off way but in a way that involves kindness and self-awareness. I wanted to unravel the sometimes circuitous way of viewing ourselves and assumptions about family relationships.

It sounds super heavy, but there’s a lot of humor and levity as well. Probably has something to do with Irish Catholic roots, but I find the darkest moments in are lives can also be the most morbidly funny as well.

W&H: What drew you to this story?

Mm: It was one I needed to tell. I think there’s an old saying about making the film you need to before the one you should? It’s not autobiographical, but in many ways, I drew upon my experiences with self-identity and my relationship to my family. In making this film, I was able to create an alternate reality where I could creatively explore my deepest fears, regrets, and hopes that may or may not play out in real life.

Probably the most powerful moment on set for me was seeing a scene that was quite difficult for me to write emotionally and watching Aya Cash, who plays Mary, bring something that was totally hers to the performance. It is an amazing thing to see an actor take your words and transform them to something that belongs to them. There is comfort in how unoriginal the narratives of lives really are.

W&H: What do you want people to think about when they are leaving the theater?

Mm: I want people to be moved and hopefully have laughed a bit, but maybe they will think about the parts of themselves or their history that they’ve avoided and what it would look like to confront those dark corners.

It ends on a beginning of sorts so I’d like the audience to think about beginnings. There is always time for a new one, I think.

W&H: What was the biggest challenge in making the film?

Mm: I’d never made a feature before, so naturally it was overwhelming from a logistical and mental standpoint. The film had a very, very small budget — around a quarter of a million dollars — and the script called for about thirty locations and thirty speaking roles. With a team of absolute heroes behind me, we got it done.

Second to the logistical stuff, it can be overwhelming as a first-time director. I just kind of told myself I can do it and put one foot in front of the other until it was done. Fear is a powerful motivator but can really inhibit you once you’re in it.

W&H: How did you get your film funded? Share some insights into how you got the film made.

Mm: Telefilm Canada has a Microbudget Programme supported by the Talent Fund that awards emerging filmmakers from certain accredited institutions — in my case, the Canadian Film Centre — with a grant to make their first feature. Additionally, we were supported by the Harold Greenberg Fund both in development and production. I also had additional investment from Wildling Pictures, the production company that produced the film. Yay, Canada!

W&H: What does it mean for you to have your film play at the Toronto International Film Festival?

Mm: It was my absolute goal and dream to premiere here. About ten years ago, I started out as an intern before leaving to pursue my own work in a roundabout way, and there is no way I thought I’d be on this side of things. And here we are. Coincidentally, in my backyard.

W&H: What’s the best and worst advice you’ve received?

Mm: Best advice: I went to a Film Fatales talk with Catherine Hardwicke last year and she said that whenever she does a big group scene, she writes out seating cards beforehand to save time. It’s a little thing that I think people can appreciate and keeps everyone moving. You easily alleviate cast and crew asking you multiple times where people are.

Worst advice: “It’s probably fine.” Whenever anyone says that, including myself, I have to take a second look. The devil is in the details.

W&H: What advice do you have for other female directors?

Mm: I’m still learning, so I give the following advice to myself as well. Be a director in a way that makes sense to you. Drop the need to “perform” director. Everyone has shown up and is waiting for you to tell them what to do so find a way to make them want to do their best. For me, that means treating people with respect and apologizing when you’re wrong.

W&H: Name your favorite woman-directed film and why.

Mm: Gah! So many. Most recently, Maren Ade’s “Toni Erdmann.” It was so singularly bold, original, and no one could have done it but her. I don’t know if I would ever make a film like that, but I have so much respect for Ade and was moved deeply by it. Deepa Mehta’s “Water” and Jane Campion’s “The Piano” are two of the most beautifully directed movies I’ve ever seen. Last Tiff, I watched Houda Benyamina’s “Divines” and I thought it was so tender and impactful.

W&H: There have been significant conversations over the last couple of years about increasing the amount of opportunities for women directors yet the numbers have not increased. Are you optimistic about the possibilities for change? Share any thoughts you might have on this topic.

Mm: Personally, I have been given a huge amount of opportunity lately — largely from projects helmed by women — so I feel very optimistic. So much has been eloquently said on this matter, but I feel like the best thing I can do is just be the best director I can be so that other people don’t see hiring a woman as a risk. A good example is Ava DuVernay hiring all these women on her series “Queen Sugar” with the philosophy that she cannot be the sole change. It’s her job to help bring other women up with her. I think that is the most powerful and useful way to make real, meaningful change.

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Tiff 2017 Women Directors: Meet Molly McGlynn — “Mary Goes Round” was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »
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