News

Rémy Schaepman, Didier Brunner’s Folivari, Prepare ‘The Nazis, My Father and Me’

A product of one of France’s great film schools, La Poudrière in Valence, southern France, Gallic animation director Rémy Schaepman is aiming, nevertheless, to open up French animation with his feature debut, ‘The Nazis, My Father and Me,’ which is set up at Paris-based Folivari.

Launched in 2014, Folivari is headed by Didier Brunner, whose producer credits include “The Triplets of Belleville” and “Kirikou” franchise.

A family action-adventure movie plus coming-of age tale set in the ‘50s in New York City, “based on a best-selling book from novelist and filmmaker Robert H. Lieberman (“Green Lights”).

Originally presented at Bordeau’s Cartoon Movie by Brunner, Schaepman and novelist and co-scriptwriter Lieberman Brunner, “Nazis” is set on the eve of WWII. It turns on Stevie, a clever 12-year-old, who is left alone in New York when his father mysteriously disappears after being menaced by two thugs. Unprotected and confused, Stevie doubts his father is a Nazi spy, is
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Studio Ghibli’s Castle In The Sky at 30

Ryan Lambie Sep 13, 2016

In 1986, Hayao Miyazaki released one of his very best films. We look back at the lasting power and influence of Laputa: Castle In The Sky.

How does humanity quench its thirst for progress while at the same time protecting the environment? Can technology and nature exist side by side, or will our destructive tendencies always get in the way? Those are questions that underscore many of Hayao Miyazaki’s films, from the lighter-than-air eco fable Nausicaa Of The Valley Of The Wind to his final animated feature, The Wind Rises.

In Miyazaki’s work, there’s a constant tension at play between nature and machines, between the tranquility of rural Japan and the industrial revolution of its post war era. The son of an aeronautical engineer, Miyazaki grew up as Japan rebuilt itself in the middle of the 20th century; he was born into a generation with
See full article at Den of Geek »

‘Horses,’ ‘Nuts!’ ‘Stations’ Make Annecy Competition Cut

‘Horses,’ ‘Nuts!’ ‘Stations’ Make Annecy Competition Cut
Ann Marie Fleming’s “Window Horses,” Penny Lane’s “Nuts!” and Sang-ho Yeon’s “Seoul Station” will screen at 2016’s nine-feature competition of the Annecy Intl. Animation Film Festival, commonly regarded as the most important animation event in the world.

In potential highlights, Guillermo del Toro will deliver a masterclass, unveiling unseen footage of “Trollhunters”; Aardman Animation founders Peter Lord and David Sproxton receive the 2016 Mifa & Variety Animation Personality of the Year Award. The Festival will also for the first time devote a major focus to France’s animation scene.

An Annecy regular, Sang-ho Yeon, a Fantasporto and Sitges winner with “Saibi” and “Dwae-ji-ui wang,” competes with “Seoul Station,” a Studio Dadashow and Finecut South Korea production. Horror and social realism blend in the tale of a homeless who first shows strange symptoms then unleashes chaos and a zombie outbreak. Finecut handles world sales.

Also targeting adult auds and produced by U.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Annecy: ‘Walter’ Joins Cultures Bringing Nature Alive at Annecy Festival

Director Clément Du Ruyter fuses French, Japanese and American influences into his own style for the upcoming animation series, “Walter.” In hopes of receiving funds for a toon skein, “Walter” chronicles a man’s journey in a magical forest as he attempts to oust strange creatures from their natural environment. The French series project draws from other man-versus-wildlife comedic animations such as American classics Yosemite Sam, Elmer Fudd and Wile E. Coyote with a blend of Japanese folklore “Yokai” and traditional European illustrations.

On “Walter,” Lorène Lescanne produces, and the screenplay is by Marie Manand; De Ruyter and Lila Poppins serve as graphic artists.

“Walter” will be presented Thursday at the Annecy Mifa market TV Special and Series pitches.

What inspired you to write this story?

Basically, I just wanted to mix European design with creatures that look Japanese. I really like Paul Grimault and Tomi Ungerer, who do [French] animation
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Alert the Kiddies! The New York International Children’s Film Festival (Nyicff) is now front and center.

Youngsters and oldsters alike…here is the reel deal: The New York International Children’s Film Festival (Nyicff) will be making its presence known in the upcoming days. On tap for the 18th annual event will be a noted variety of creative animated films and shorts for all ages to enjoy and relish. The New York International Children’s Film Festival promises to serve up an array of animated showcases that boasts all styles and formats that should prove imaginative and appealing to our past and present childhood memories.

Please note that the Nyicff will run its operation from February 27, 2015 to March 22, 2015. Additionally, the majority of these impressive feature-length and short films have experienced critical acclaim overseas. Therefore, the impact of the Nyicff’s cinematic selections should be rewarding for ardent fans of animated film fodder designed to capture the spirit of its enthusiastic viewers.

Among the films being displayed
See full article at SoundOnSight »

A Brief Tour of Egyptian Animation

Ridley Scott’s Exodus: Gods and Kings is out this weekend. Yet the buzz remains about the casting controversy rather than the (apparently low) quality of the film itself. Rupert Murdoch tweeted that as far as he’s concerned, Egyptians have always been white. I wouldn’t begin to try to exhaustively explain the Australian media mogul’s unfortunate perspective. There is, however, something fascinating and troubling about the whitewashing of Egypt because of 1) its role in the Bible and 2) its place in ancient history. Not only does it belie a misconception of Ancient Egypt, it also tends to eclipse any acknowledgment of Egypt as an existing nation of 87 million people who possess a rich culture and who write in Arabic, not hieroglyphics. So, here’s a proposal. Don’t go see Exodus: Gods and Kings. Instead, take a few minutes and dive into the tradition of modern Egyptian animation. There
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

It’s Taken Decades, But the Surreal Animated Film The King and the Mockingbird Is Finally Here

  • Vulture
In 1946, the French animator Paul Grimault and poet/screenwriter Jacques Prévert set out to make what they hoped would be the first French animated feature film, based on Hans Christian Andersen’s tale “The Shepherdess and the Chimneysweep.” Prévert was already a legend, having written Le jour se lève and Children of Paradise for director Marcel Carné. Meanwhile, Grimault’s wonderfully iconoclastic fables had won favor both during and after the war. You wouldn’t think two such heavy-duty names would meet much resistance, but within a couple of years, Grimault and Prévert had lost control of the project, and an incomplete, 63-minute version was released without their approval in 1953. That also made its way to U.S. shores in a dubbed version as The Curious Case of Mr. Wonderbird.A couple of decades later, the duo set out to complete the film. Prévert worked on the new script until
See full article at Vulture »

‘Reach Me,’ A Dozen More Reach Out To Specialty Film Audiences This Weekend

  • Deadline
‘Reach Me,’ A Dozen More Reach Out To Specialty Film Audiences This Weekend
A long time in the making, Reach Me, from filmmaker/actor John Herzfeld brings ‘positive thinking’ and ‘self-help’ to the big screen. It stars a bevy of Herzfeld’s actor friends and friends of friends, including Sylvester Stallone, Kyra Sedgwick and Kevin Connolly.

The title is one of a dozen or so newcomers opening in limited release this weekend. Music Box’s Happy Valley and Kino Lorber’s Monk With A Camera are among Friday’s debuting documentaries.

Happy Valley, named after the area where Pennsylvania State University is located, dives into the child sexual-abuse scandal that rocked Penn State, while Monk looks at an unlikely ascetic who gave up life in the fast lane.

Kino Lorber also is launching Iranian Western Vampire pic A Girl Walks Home Alone At Night, which it is releasing with Vice Films. The title, which was born out of a previous short film, debuted at Sundance in January.
See full article at Deadline »

The King and the Mockingbird Is Elegant and Climaxes with a Robot Attack

The most swooning and elegant hand-drawn animation masterpiece to climax with a giant robot attack, Paul Grimault's The King and the Mockingbird wings onto stateside screens at last, after a near-30-year gestation — and then another 30 of baffling obscurity after that. Grimault initiated the project in '48, but his charming fable quickly fell afoul of troubles even kings and robots can't stand up to: rights issues. In 1980 he released the 82-minute version we have today, with about half its length derived from an incomplete 1952 iteration; now the full thing is at last restored and available and just waiting for you to gape, laugh, and cheer at it. The story is a gently surrealist gloss on Hans Christian Andersen, steeped in Tintin, Metropolis, Sno...
See full article at Village Voice »

Criterion Collection: The Complete Jacques Tati | Blu-ray Review

With only six feature films to his name, four of which featured his iconic onscreen alter ego, the cinema of Jacques Tati remains an island of unique delight despite his influence on decades of filmmakers since and comparative efforts of peers from his own period (considering Marguerite Duras’ critique, now widely accepted, concerning the taken-for-granted stylistic likeness between Tati and Robert Bresson, a director whose subject matters were a bit less pleasant or comical). Without Tati and his bumbling character Monsieur Hulot, sputtering about memorably in a series of some of the most well-crafted moments of ingenious, highly organized chaos ever put to celluloid, we’d be without latter day influences, like Roy Andersson, Otar Iosseliani, several Peter Sellers characters, and even Rowan Atkinson’s similarly crafted Mr. Bean.

At the time, Tati’s obvious influences date back to the silent era, where Buster Keaton and Charles Chaplin crafted the
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Saturday Morning Cartoon: On the Eve of Nyff’s ‘The King and the Mockingbird,’ Watch an Early Short by Paul Grimault

The King and the Mockingbird is one of those legendary animated features with a tortured production history, along the lines of Richard Williams’s The Thief and the Cobbler and Yuri Norshtein’s still-unfinished The Overcoat. French artist Paul Grimault began the project in the late 1940s under the title The Shepherdess and the Chimneysweep, taken from a Hans Christian Andersen story. The script was by Jacques Prévert, by that point one of the most important poets and screenwriters working in France. In spite of all these talents, however, production stalled and a great deal of money was lost. Grimault’s studio, Les Gemeaux, was forced to close and his former partner released an unfinished version without his permission in 1952. Eventually Grimault regained the rights to the project, secured funding and was able to finally complete his own version of the project in the late 1970s. It was renamed Le Roi et l’oiseau, literally
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

Us deal for The Look Of Silence

  • ScreenDaily
Drafthouse Films and Participant Media have jointly acquired all Us rights to Joshua Oppenheimer’s The Look Of Silence, set to premiere in Venice on Thursday (August 28). In other news, Open Road has dated Triple Nine, Millennium has acquired The World Made Straight and Lionsgate plans a Saw tenth anniversary re-release.

Oppenheimer’s follow-up to The Act Of Killing will receive its Canadian premiere in Toronto on September 9 and is a companion piece to this year’s Oscar-nominated documentary.

The Look Of Silence (pictured) explores the legacy of the Indonesian genocide from the victim’s point of view, following the brother of a murdered man as he confronts the killers.

Signe Byrge Sørensen produced and the executive producers are Errol Morris, Werner Herzog and André Singer.

The parties plan a summer 2015 Us release and negotiated the deal with Cinephil’s Philippa Kowarsky for Sorensen and Final Cut For Real.

Open Road has set a September 11 release for the
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Us deal for Tiff premiere The Look Of Silence

  • ScreenDaily
Drafthouse Films and Participant Media have jointly acquired all Us rights to Joshua Oppenheimer’s The Look Of Silence, set to premiere in Venice on Thursday (August 28). In other news, Open Road has dated Triple Nine, Millennium has acquired The World Made Stratight and Lionsgate plans a Saw tenth anniversary re-release.

Oppenheimer’s follow-up to The Act Of Killing will receive its Canadian premiere in Toronto on September 9 and is a companion piece to this year’s Oscar-nominated documentary.

The Look Of Silence (pictured) explores the legacy of the Indonesian genocide from the victim’s point of view, following the brother of a murdered man as he confronts the killers.

Signe Byrge Sørensen produced and the executive producers are Errol Morris, Werner Herzog and André Singer.

The parties plan a summer 2015 Us release and negotiated the deal with Cinephil’s Philippa Kowarsky for Sorensen and Final Cut For Real.

Open Road has set a September 11 release for the
See full article at ScreenDaily »

New York Film Festival sets special screening of 'Spinal Tap'

New York Film Festival sets special screening of 'Spinal Tap'
The 2014 New York Film Festival will host a series of special events, the Film Society of Lincoln Center announced in a press release today. A number of films will make their U.S. premieres at the festival, in addition to an anniversary screening that will turn the whole festival up to 11. While dates have yet to be announced, This Is Spinal Tap will receive a 30th-anniversary screening. In 1984, Rob Reiner’s mockumentary satirized the lifestyle of rock musicians and has since been a staple of movie history.

Star and writer Christopher Guest will attend the screening, through no other members
See full article at EW.com - Inside Movies »

‘This Is Spinal Tap’ Gets Anniversary Screening at New York Film Festival

‘This Is Spinal Tap’ Gets Anniversary Screening at New York Film Festival
The 2014 New York Film Festival will present a special screening of “This Is Spinal Tap” in celebration of the film’s 30th anniversary, with writer-star Christopher Guest on board to appear at the event.

The screening of influential mockumentary “Spinal Tap” — the latest in a string of Nyff anniversary fetes that has in previous years included “The Royal Tenenbaums,” “The Princess Bride” and “Dazed and Confused” — comes on the heels of the Film Society of Lincoln Center, the org that presents Nyff, giving its annual Chaplin Award to Rob Reiner, the movie’s director (as well as the helmer of “Princess Bride”).

Prior Nyff anniversary screenings have attracted the attendance of multiple cast members and creatives from the projects being screened; only Guest has so far been confirmed for the Nyff event. Date of the screening remains to be announced

Spinal Tap” joins a roster of Nyff special events that
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Rerelease: The King and the Mockingbird Review

A significant mark in the history of animation, The King and the Mockingbird celebrates the 30th anniversary of its UK release with a fully restored theatrical release. Based on Hans Christian Anderson’s fairy tale The Shepherdess and the Chimney Sweep, Paul Grimault’s interpretation takes place in an obscure kingdom powered by strings and pulleys and reigned by a vicious and greedy king.

After a series of fantastical events, this pompous royal is overthrown by his portrait, whose sole mission is to steal the escaped portrait figure of a willowy shepherdess from a handsome chimney sweep whom she loves. It has all the makings of Christian Anderson’s tales; forbidden love, jealousy and trickery. After a lifesaving encounter the Chimney Sweep and the Shepherdess are helped in their escape by a self-assured Mocking Bird who frees the pair from the King’s clutches on several occasions, aiding them through the trap laden kingdom.
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Movie Review – The King and the Mockingbird (1980)

The King and the Mockingbird (French: Le Roi et l’oiseau), 1980.

Directed by Paul Grimault.

Featuring the voice talents of Jean Martin, Pascal Mazzotti, Raymond Bussières, Agnès Viala and Renaud Marx.

Synopsis:

A chimney sweep and a shepherdess seek to escape from the clutches of a tyrannical king.

The modern animation industry is very much a business, as opposed to an art-form or creative industry. Looking at recent uninspired projects and unnecessary sequels such as Monsters University and Planes just to name a few, it’s easy to come to some clear conclusions about the state of contemporary animation. If it’s not highly merchandised, franchised or derivative, it doesn’t seem to get made, at least by the likes of Disney or Pixar.

The recent retiring of the masterful Hayao Miyazaki of Studio Ghibli fame only helps further cement this uninspired era in animated history. To bring this seemingly irrelevant introduction full circle,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

The King and the Mockingbird review 'A richly conceived treat'

This beautiful reissued French animation draws on Fritz Lang and seems to prefigure the style of Japanese anime

Here is an animated gem from 1980, which draws on classic modes that came before it and anticipates the Japanese animation that followed. Jacques Prévert was working on its screenplay until virtually his dying day. The animator Paul Grimault was refining and wrangling over the movie, Le Roi et L'Oiseau, with producing partners for decades, following an argument over a early rough-cut showing in the early 50s. It is loosely based on Hans Christian Andersen's The Shepherdess and the Chimney Sweep. A pompous King, puffed up with pure Bourbon vanity, rules over the fantasy kingdom of Takicardia, whose surreal vastness is enough to give anyone a heart disorder. He falls in love with the portrait of a shepherdess. However, this imaginary woman runs off with the equally imaginary chimney sweep in the neighbouring canvas,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Film Review: 'The King and the Mockingbird'

  • CineVue
★★★★☆Marking the 30th anniversary of its UK debut, StudioCanal rereleases the highly influential The King and the Mockingbird (1980) in a fully restored version after a popular reissue in France last year, offering audiences both old and new the chance to experience a landmark work of sublime hand-drawn animation 28 years in the making. Long considered a masterpiece of the genre, the film is the product of a collaboration between filmmaker Paul Grimault and screenwriter Jacques Prévert who, together in 1947, began loosely adapting Hans Christian Andersen fairytale The Shepherdess and the Chimney Sweep, though complications arose and an unfinished version was released without their approval.
See full article at CineVue »

Ghibli to distribute foreign titles

Ghibli to distribute foreign titles
TOKYO -- Famed around the world for its animated film, Japan's Studio Ghibli is branching out into distributing a range of foreign titles in the territory.

The producer behind such classics as "Spirited Away" and "Princess Mononoke" -- both directed by Hayao Miyazaki -- has distributed two imported films in the past, but wants to give Japanese moviegoers even wider access to animated cinema.

"Both previous films proved very successful and it is clear that the approach worked and people want to see different stories and different styles," said Mikiko Takeda of Studio Ghibli's international division. "We believe we are The Only Ones who can introduce these movies to an audience."

The previous titles were "Kirikou and the Sorcerer", by Michel Ocelot, and Paul Grimault's "Le Roi et L'Oiseau".

The new project is being undertaken by the Ghibli Museum and will see the films screened at the Cinema Angelika in Tokyo's Shibuya district, Takeda said.

"To only have stills from these movies on display at the museum would not work as animation needs to be seen in that form for it to work," Takeda said.

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