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In a war film, what’s the difference between nasty exploitation and just plain honest reportage? André De Toth made tough-minded action films with the best of them, and this nail-biting commando mission with Michael Caine and Nigel Davenport is simply superb, one of those great action pictures that’s not widely screened. To its credit it’s not ‘feel good’ enough to be suitable for Memorial Day TV marathons.

Play Dirty

Blu-ray

Twilight Time

1968 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 118 min. / Street Date October 17, 2017 / Available from the Twilight Time Movies Store 29.95

Starring: Michael Caine, Nigel Davenport, Nigel Green, Harry Andrews.

Cinematography: Edward Scaife

Film Editor: Jack Slade

Art Direction: Tom Morahan, Maurice Pelling

Original Music: Michel Legrand

Written by Lotte Colin, Melvyn Bragg, from a story by George Marton

Produced by Harry Saltzman

Directed by André De Toth

Some movies that were ignored when new now seem far more important, perhaps due to the tenor of times.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

The Skull

Peter Cushing! Christopher Lee! Each is at the top of his game, playing competing collectors of occult incunabula — the kind that comes with a satanic curse, when the purloined item in question is the Skull Of The infamous, despicable and sharp-toothed Marquis De Sade! Freddie Francis directs up a storm in this amicable Amicus chiller: the mysterious skull-duggery is beautifully shot and edited, giving the horror scenes real Bite.

The Skull

Blu-ray

Kl Studio Classics

1965 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 83 min. / Street Date March 14, 2017 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95

Starring: Peter Cushing, Patrick Wymark, Nigel Green, Jill Bennett, Michael Gough, Ceorge Couloris, Christopher Lee.

Cinematography: John Wilcox

Art Direction: Bill Constable

Film Editor: Oswald Hafenrichter

Original Music: Elisabeth Lutyens

Written by Milton Subotsky from a story by Robert Bloch

Produced by Milton Subotsky, Max J. Rosenberg

Directed by Freddie Francis

Nine years ago Legend Films brought us a DVD of this 1965 horror item,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

March 14th Blu-ray & DVD Releases Include Firestarter, The Love Witch, Z Nation Season 3

  • DailyDead
Well, I hope you guys have been saving your pennies, because there are a lot of great horror and sci-fi titles coming home on March 14th. Scream Factory is giving Firestarter the Collector’s Edition treatment this week, and both Drive-In Massacre and The Skull are being resurrected in HD as well.

If you missed them during their theatrical runs late last year, both The Love Witch and Paul Verhoeven’s award-winning thriller Elle are getting Blu-ray / DVD releases this Tuesday, and Demon Seed is making its way to Blu-ray as well (which I highly recommend watching if you haven't).

Other notable home entertainment titles for March 14th include Passengers, Z Nation Season 3, Johnny Frank Garrett’s Last Word, Stray Bullets, and The Man Who Could Cheat Death.

Drive-In Massacre (Severin Films, Blu-ray & DVD)

It was one of the few true slasher movies to pre-date Halloween and Friday The 13th,
See full article at DailyDead »

Blu-ray / DVD Release Details for The Skull (1965), Starring Peter Cushing & Christopher Lee

  • DailyDead
Peter Cushing and Christopher Lee, two of the horror genre's greatest and classiest titans, star in The Skull, and Kino Lorber has revealed the special features and cover art for their upcoming Blu-ray and DVD release of the 1965 film.

From Kino Lorber Studio Classics: "Coming March 14th on DVD and Blu-ray!

The Skull (1965) with optional English subtitles

• Audio Commentary by Film Historian Tim Lucas

Jonathan Rigby on The Skull" featurette (24:14)

Kim Newman on The Skull" featurette (27:18)

• "Trailers From Hell" with Joe Dante

• Reversible Blu-ray Art

• Trailers"

Synopsis: "The skull of the Marquis de Sade has been taken from its grave, bringing terror to those who own it. Demonologist Christopher Maitland (Peter Cushing) is eager to add the piece to his occult collection. Despite the warnings of a friend (Christopher Lee), he's got to have it. And does he ever get it.

"The Skull (1965) Starring Peter Cushing, Christopher Lee,
See full article at DailyDead »

Kino Lorber Announces Blu-ray / DVD Release of The Skull (1965), Starring Peter Cushing & Christopher Lee

  • DailyDead
Kino Lorber has announced a new Blu-ray and DVD release of 1965's The Skull, starring two of the horror genre's greatest and classiest titans: Peter Cushing and Christopher Lee.

While the Blu-ray / DVD cover art and special features for The Skull have not yet been revealed, we'll be sure to keep Daily Dead readers updated on further details. In the meantime, we have a look at Kino Lorber's official announcement below, as well as the film's poster and trailer. Will you be adding The Skull to your home media collection?

From Kino Lorber: "Coming Soon on DVD and Blu-ray! Bonus Features to be Announced Soon!

The Skull (1965) Starring Peter Cushing, Christopher Lee, Patrick Wymark, Jill Bennett, Nigel Green, Patrick Magee, Michael Gough, George Coulouris and Peter Woodthorpe - Based on story "The Skull of the Marquis de Sade" by Robert Bloch - Screenplay by Milton Subotsky - Directed
See full article at DailyDead »

Mysterious Island (Encore Edition)

Fans that missed Twilight Time's initial Blu-ray release of Ray Harryhausen's Jules Verne spectacle get a second chance with this Encore Edition reissue. It includes an improved transfer and new extras, including an excellent audio commentary with Steven C. Smith, C. Courtney Joyner and Randall William Cook. The show still sends us, and Bernard Herrmann's powerful music score shakes the rafters. Mysterious Island Blu-ray Twilight Time 1961 / Color / 1:66 widescreen / 101 min. / Encoire Limited Edition / available at the Screen Archives Entertainment website; Street Date December 8, 2015 / 29.95 Starring Michael Craig, Michael Callan, Beth Rogan, Gary Merrill, Herbert Lom, Joan Greenwood, Percy Herbert. Cinematography Wilkie Cooper Special visual effects Ray Harryhausen Art Direction Bill Andrews Film Editor Frederick Wilson Original Music Bernard Herrmann Written by John Prebble, Daniel B. Ullman and Crane Wilbur from the novel by Jules Verne Produced by Charles H. Schneer Directed by Cy Endfield

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Seven Anti-James Bond Movies You Haven’t Seen

  • SoundOnSight
The Bond franchise which has been with us so long, has become so deeply entrenched in popular culture, that we often forget what it was that first distinguished the Bonds a half-century ago. Skyfall might be one of the best of the Bonds, and even, arguably, one of the best big-budget big-action flicks to come along in quite a while, but it’s not alone. The annual box office is – and has been, for quite some time – dominated by big, action-packed blockbusters of one sort of another. The Bonds aren’t even the only action-driven spy flicks (Mr. James Bond, I’d like you to meet Mr. Jason Bourne and Mr. Ethan Hunt).

That’s not to take anything away from the superb entertainment Skyfall is, or the sentimentally treasured place the Bonds hold. It’s only to say that where there was once just the one, there are now many.
See full article at SoundOnSight »

‘The Skull’ Blu-ray Review

Stars: Peter Cushing, Christopher Lee, Patrick Wymark, Jill Bennett, Nigel Green, Patrick Magee, Peter Woodthorpe, Michael Gough, George Coulouris | Written by Milton Subotsky | Directed by Freddie Francis

For fans of Hammer Horror films, Amicus was another studio that felt comfortably close to its style, yet just different enough to bring more diversity to your horror taste. With The Skull, Amicus brought together horror icons Peter Cushing and Christopher Lee in yet another story of the dangers of the darker side of life…

The Skull sees Cushing star as Dr. Maitland a collector of strange and unusual artefacts. When he buys a skull said to be that of the Marquis De Sade, he ignores the warnings from fellow collector Sir Matthew Phillips (Christopher Lee) of the dangers of owning it. As the skull soon begins to take control of his mind, he soon realises the danger he has put himself and his wife in,
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

DVD Review: "Tobruk" (1967) Starring Rock Hudson And George Peppard

  • CinemaRetro
By Doug Oswald

Released by Universal in 1967, “Tobruk” opens with the feel of a 1960s spy thriller. Rock Hudson is Major Donald Craig, a Canadian prisoner of war on board a German transport ship anchored somewhere off the North Africa coast in late 1942. A group of frogmen surface near the ship and sneak on board with silencers fixed to their guns in order to capture Craig. The frogmen are led by Captain Bergman (George Peppard) who reveal themselves to be part of a team of German commandos.

The commandos take Craig to a German airfield and fly him to a desert landing strip. They’re unexpectedly greeted by a group of British soldiers led by Colonel Harker (Nigel Green). It’s revealed that Bergman is the leader of a German-Jewish commando unit attached to a group of British commandos operating in North Africa. They secured the rescue of Craig due
See full article at CinemaRetro »

The top 25 secret agents in film

  • Den of Geek
Ahead of American Ultra's arrival in UK cinemas, here's our pick of the 25 finest, sneakiest secret agents in film...

Operatives. Spies. Moles. Infiltrators. Secret agents go by many names. In fact, Britain's national security agency doesn't even call them agents - they're covert human intelligence sources, or simply “officers".

Whatever we choose to call them, secret agents lead necessarily furtive and obscure lives - so obscure that most of what we know about them is defined by what we've seen and read in books and movies.

During the Cold War, the image of the secret agent as a well-groomed sophisticate in a suit proliferated all over the world, and even in the high-tech landscape of the 21st century, that image still stands - just look at such movies as Kingsman: The Secret Service, The Man From U.N.C.L.E. and, of course, the Bond franchise. But secret agents can come in many other guises,
See full article at Den of Geek »

Raising Caine on TCM: From Smooth Gay Villain to Tough Guy in 'Best British Film Ever'

Michael Caine young. Michael Caine movies: From Irwin Allen bombs to Woody Allen classic It's hard to believe that Michael Caine has been around making movies for nearly six decades. No wonder he's had time to appear – in roles big and small and tiny – in more than 120 films, ranging from unwatchable stuff like the Sylvester Stallone soccer flick Victory and Michael Ritchie's adventure flick The Island to Brian G. Hutton's X, Y and Zee, Joseph L. Mankiewicz's Sleuth (a duel of wits and acting styles with Laurence Olivier), and Alfonso Cuarón's Children of Men. (See TCM's Michael Caine movie schedule further below.) Throughout his long, long career, Caine has played heroes and villains and everything in between. Sometimes, in his worst vehicles, he has floundered along with everybody else. At other times, he was the best element in otherwise disappointing fare, e.g., Philip Kaufman's Quills.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

18 films that took their inspiration from James Bond movies

Bourne and Mission: Impossible, right back to Harry Palmer and Danger Diabolik - meet the many pretenders to James Bond's throne...

Since 1962, the James Bond franchise has come to define the spy genre, for good or ill. More broadly, every thriller and action film that comes out now either uses them as inspiration, or attempts to ignore or re-work the tropes that have come to be associated with the series.

Coming off the release of Kingsman: The Secret Service, and with the release of a new Bond film this year, now seems like the perfect time to take a look at a sample of the films which have been inspired by James Bond — either as homages, parodies or reactions.

The Ipcress File (1965)

Produced by James Bond producer Harry Saltzman as a more grounded alternative to the largesse of Bond, The Ipcress File is more concerned with the intricacies of real spy-work — the endless paperwork,
See full article at Den of Geek »

Trailers From Hell Says 'Let's Kill Uncle'

Trailers From Hell Says 'Let's Kill Uncle'
The great Nigel Green brings a delicious patina of sardonic menace to one of his few lead roles as the cheerful would-be assassin of his newly rich nephew. One of William Castle’s later efforts, it’s gimmick-less and shot pretty much like a tv show, but its uneasy mix of fun and child murder has a pleasingly unwholesome tone.
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

‘Twins of Evil’ & ‘Countess Dracula’ Blu-ray Review

Hammer have had something of a renaissance on Blu-ray recently, with StudioCanal releasing a number of classic titles in new hi-def editions. And now, released as part of Network’s ‘The British Film’ collection, comes two of Hammer’s “sexier” films of the 70s: the infamous Twins of Evil, starring Playboy Playmates Mary and Madeleine Collinson; and Countess Dracula, which features a career-defining performance from Ingrid Pitt in the titular role.

Despite being made during Hammer early-70s fallow period, where the studio was running out of stories, out of budget and were being left behind by more “extreme” horror films and exploitation movies emanating from the Us (after all this was just after the release of Night of the Living Dead which ultimately changed the face of the genre forever), both Twins of Evil and Countess Dracula are beloved by fans of the studio, and with good reason.

Twins of Evil

Stars: Peter Cushing,
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

The Evolution of Hercules in Pop Culture

  • VH1.com
This weekend marks Hercules’ return to the big screen. A staple in the hero canon, the half man, and half god has slayed lions, bedded mortal women, and even hung out with the Three Stooges. Over the past seven decades, the hero has transformed from an Italian Stallion of the 1950s to the Blockbuster Beefcake we see today thanks to Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson and Kellan Lutz taking on the title role. With the former’s film (Hercules directed by Brett Ratner) opening this weekend, we thought it was a good time to look at the evolution of Hercules on the big screen.

’50s: The Italian Stallion

A star of the “sword and scandal” genre, Hercules became a regular fixture in Italian cinema during the 1950s. These historical epics were seen as the country’s answer to successful big-budget Hollywood films, such as Spartacus and The Ten Commandments.

Subsequently, the
See full article at VH1.com »

May 6th DVD & Blu-ray Releases Include The Birds, Countess Dracula, Godzilla Movies

  • DailyDead
Hey everyone! Starting this week, Daily Dead is going to be bringing you a weekly DVD & Blu-ray release recap so that you guys and gals can better keep up on all the great home horror entertainment coming at you each and every week. Considering the amount of titles being announced these days, we figured this would be a handy reminder of just some of the awesome movies you can to add to your own DVD and Blu-ray collections.

Here’s a rundown on what’s coming your way this week including a ton of amazing classic titles in hi-def from Universal Studios, a handful of Godzilla sequels being released on Blu-ray, and more.

Spotlight Titles:

Rear Window (Universal Studios Home Entertainment, Blu-ray & Digital HD with UltraViolet)

None of Hitchcock’s films has ever given a clearer view of his genius for suspense than Rear Window. When professional photographer J.B.
See full article at DailyDead »

Blu-ray Review: "Zulu" (1964) Starring Stanley Baker, Michael Caine And Jack Hawkins; Twilight Time Limited Edition Release

  • CinemaRetro
By Lee Pfeiffer

Since its initial release fifty years ago, director Cy Endfield's British war epic Zulu has grown in stature. The film was understandably a hit in England but was deemed a boxoffice disappointment in the United States perhaps due to the fact that, like Khartoum (1966), the story relates to a historic battle that is well known by Brits by is virtually unknown to American audiences. What no one can dispute is that the film represents masterful movie making. Again, like Khartoum, it is a thinking man's war epic. The film relates the story of the Battle of Rorke's Drift, a tiny British outpost in southern Africa directly in the heart of the Zulu kingdom. A haunting pre-titles sequence shows the bloody aftermath of the Battle of Isandlwana, in which a British expeditionary force was massacred by Zulus in a sophisticated attack that stunned the government in London.
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Synapse Releasing Hammer Classic Countess Dracula in a Blu-ray/DVD Combo Pack in May

Synapse Films has a new release heading our way in May that fans of classic 70's horror are sure to want to take note of. Hammer's dark and underrated Countess Dracula, starring the voluptuous Ingrid Pitt, will be available in a Blu-ray/DVD Combo Pack on May 6th.

The film was directed by Peter Sasdy and co-stars Nigel Green, Lesley-Anne Down, Sandor Elès, Patience Collier, and Maurice Denham.

Synopsis:

The beautiful Ingrid Pitt (The Wicker Man, Where Eagles Dare) stars as Elisabeth Nádasdy, an aging Hungarian Countess who discovers she can reverse her aging by bathing in the blood of young women.

While in her youthful state, the Countess falls for the handsome Lt. Imre Toth (Elès) and impersonates her own daughter (Down) to win his affections. Soon girls in the village go missing… kidnapped and murdered by the Countess and her steward, Julie (Collier), to satiate her horrifying bloodlust.
See full article at Dread Central »

Countess Dracula Blu-ray Release Details and Cover Art

  • DailyDead
We’ve known for a while that Synapse Films was going to bring Countess Dracula to Blu-ray and now an official release date has been announced. We also have details on a petition for Warner Bros. to bring their Hammer titles to Blu-ray. Thanks to DVD Drive-In, we know that Synapse Films will release Countess Dracula as a Blu-ray / DVD combo on May 6th:

“The beautiful Ingrid Pitt (The Vampire Lovers) stars as Elisabeth Nádasdy, an aging Hungarian Countess who discovers she can reverse her aging by bathing in the blood of young women. While in her youthful state, the Countess falls for the handsome Imre Toth (Sandor Elès), and impersonates her own daughter to win his actions. Soon, girls in the village go missing… kidnapped and murdered by the Countess and her steward, Julie (Patience Collier) to satiate her horrifying bloodlust. Can Elisabeth live a life of deception
See full article at DailyDead »

Ten Miscastings That Worked – or Nearly Worked!

Miscasting in films has always been a problem. A producer hires an actor thinking that he or she is perfect for a movie role only to find the opposite is true. Other times a star is hired for his box office draw but ruins an otherwise good movie because he looks completely out of place.

There have been many humdinger miscastings. You only have to laugh at John Wayne’s Genghis Khan (with Mongol moustache and gun-belt) in The Conqueror (1956), giggle at Marlon Brando’s woeful upper class twang as Fletcher Christian in Mutiny on the Bounty (1962) and cringe at Dick Van Dyke’s misbegotten cockney accent in Mary Poppins (1964). But as hilarious as these miscastings are, producers at the time didn’t think the same way, until after the event. At least they add a bit of camp value to a mediocre or downright awful movie.

In rare cases,
See full article at Shadowlocked »
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