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BFI Launches Huge Database Spanning a Century of British Film

BFI Launches Huge Database Spanning a Century of British Film
Judi Dench is the most prolific working female actor in British film today. Michael Caine is the most prolific male actor. Queen Victoria, James Bond, and Sherlock Holmes are, in that order, the characters who have appeared most in British film, while war is the subject covered most.

Such are some of the facts now discoverable in the British Film Institute’s new Filmography database, a huge digital repository covering more than 100 years of film in the U.K., with details of more than 10,000 movies and 250,000 cast and crew.

Filmography is designed to be used by fans and industry professionals alike, and is segmented into 130 genres. Drama is the most popular category on Filmography, with 3,710 films. Comedy and romance are other key groupings. While more films have been made about war than any other subject, there are more films about Europe than Britain, the database shows, even as the U.K.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

'Alfie': THR's 1966 Review

'Alfie': THR's 1966 Review
On Aug. 24, 1966, Paramount brought Michael Caine's Alfie to theaters. The film went on to be nominated for five Oscars at the 39th Academy Awards ceremony, including best picture and actor. The Hollywood Reporter's original review is below.

Alfie is a contemporary Tom Jones, a young man pursuing what he calls the "birds" with relentless and apparently inexhaustible energy. His object is sex: cheery and irresponsible. He is caught up and changed when he finds responsibility is inescapable. Lewis Gilbert's production for Paramount is an amusing, moving and meaningful picture.

Although for much of the way it tinkles...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

More Gay Stars and Directors and Screenwriters on TCM: From psychos and psychiatrists to surfers and stage mamas

On the day a U.S. appeals court lifted an injunction that blocked a Mississippi “religious freedom” law – i.e., giving Christian extremists the right to discriminate against gays, lesbians, bisexuals, transgender people, etc. – not to mention the publication of a Republican-backed health care bill targeting the poor, the sick, the elderly, and those with “pre-existing conditions” – which would include HIV-infected people, a large chunk of whom are gay and bisexual men, so the wealthy in the U.S. can get a massive tax cut, Turner Classic Movies' 2017 Gay Pride or Lgbt Month celebration continues (into tomorrow morning, Thursday & Friday, June 22–23) with the presentation of movies by or featuring an eclectic – though seemingly all male – group: Montgomery Clift, Anthony Perkins, Tab Hunter, Dirk Bogarde, John Schlesinger, Tennessee Williams, Gore Vidal, Arthur Laurents, and Jerome Robbins. After all, one assumes that, rumors or no, the presence of Mercedes McCambridge in one
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Roger Moore, Former James Bond Actor, Passes Away at 89

  • MovieWeb
Roger Moore, Former James Bond Actor, Passes Away at 89
Roger Moore, who is best known for playing James Bond in seven movies throughout the 70s and 80s, has passed away at the age of 89. The actor succumbed to cancer. The veteran star died in Switzerland. It has been announced that he will have a private funeral in Monaco in accordance with his wishes.

To some, Roger Moore is the only James Bond that matters. To others, he is the quintessential Bond, personifying the sexiness and cool European swagger that made his take on the character slightly different than those that came before him and those that followed. He was the first to present Bond with a grand sense of humor, that hasn't been matched in any of other movies in this long running series. But no matter what your stance on the matter is, Moore is one of the best Bonds to ever sip a Martini and chase both
See full article at MovieWeb »

Raising Caine: Sir Michael Going On In Style

Tony Black on screen legend Michael Caine

His recent political leanings aside, Sir Michael Caine remains one of the surviving legends of British and indeed American cinema of the last fifty years, and this weekend’s Going in Style–a heist caper directed by none other than ScrubsZach Braff–sees him share top billing with fellow aged legend Morgan Freeman for what seems the first time in a while. Over recent years the iconic British figure–known for his slick Cockney accent which bore fruit with numerous catchphrases in more than one seminal British film–has become more widely known to audiences as a character actor, heavily used in Christopher Nolan’s body of work since appearing as Alfred Pennyworth in Batman Begins.

So began a certain career resurgence for the man born Maurice Micklewhite under the sound of bow bells, but as Sir Michael–now into his 80’s
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

September Storm — 3-D

3-D in CinemaScope? That seems like a strange combination, but this obscure treasure hunt adventure with Joanne Dru and Mark Stevens is indeed billed as being filmed in the ‘Miracle of Stereo-Vision,’ five years after the demise of Hollywood’s first fling with ‘depthies.’ Kino and the 3-D Film Archives extras include two vintage 3-D shorts, one of them never screened in 3-D.

September Storm

3-D Blu-ray

Kino Classics

1960 / Color / 2:39 widescreen / 92 min. / Street Date March 28, 2017 / available through Kino Lorber / 34.95

Starring: Joanne Dru, Mark Stevens, Robert Strauss Asher Dann, Jean-Pierre Kérien, Véra Valmont..

Cinematography: Lamar Boren, Jorge Stahl Jr.

Film Editor: Alberto Valenzuela

Art Direction: Boris Leven

Underwater director: Paul Stader

Original Music: Edward L. Alperson Jr., Raoul Kraushaar

Written by W.R. Burnett from a story by Steve Fisher

Produced by Edward L. Alperson

Directed by Byron Haskin

The 3-D Film Archive has been an amazing resource for the fascinating depth format,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Watch Us Pull a Rabbit Out of our Hat

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A quick look at the slinky sleight-of-hand involved in making movies about magic.

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Categories Not categorized 0% Your result has been entered into leaderboard Loading Name: E-Mail: Captcha: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Answered Review Question 1 of 10 1. Question

In 1932’s Chandu The Magician, Edmund Lowe plays the titular wizard. What famous boogie man plays his adversary?

Bela Lugosi Boris Karloff Peter Lorre Correct

Lugosi is a lot of fun but the real star of this movie is director William Cameron Menzies whose distinctive visual style graces every scene.

Incorrect

Question 2 of 10 2. Question

1953’s Houdini
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Curzon to receive Bafta for outstanding contribution to cinema

Cinema chain and distribution label to be recognised at this year’s Bafta ceremony.

Arthouse cinema group Curzon will receive the outstanding British contribution to cinema award at the 2017 Bafta film awards (held on 12 February).

Curzon operates a network of 15 independent cinemas, as well as distribution label Curzon Artificial eye and video-on-demand platform Curzon Home Cinema.

The innovative cinema brand opened in 1934 with the Curzon Mayfair and now has venues in Soho, Canterbury and Sheffield.

Distribution label Curzon Artificial Eye, which celebrated its 40th anniversary last year, champions new and classic cinema from Britain, Europe and around the world.

Its catalogue includes works by Andrei Tarkovsky, Satyajit Ray, Claire Denis, Charlie Chaplin, Lynne Ramsay, Michael Haneke and Mia Hansen-Løve.

Philip Knatchbull, CEO of Curzon, said: “I’m delighted that Curzon’s contribution to film has been recognised by Bafta. Curzon has a long and proud history in the British film industry and many talented and passionate people
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Curzon to receive Bafta for outstanding British contribution to cinema

Cinema chain and distribution label to be recognised at this year’s Bafta ceremony.

Arthouse cinema group Curzon will receive the outstanding British contribution to cinema award at the 2017 Bafta film awards (held on 12 February).

Curzon operates a network of 15 independent cinemas, as well as distribution label Curzon Artificial eye and video-on-demand platform Curzon Home Cinema.

The innovative cinema brand opened in 1934 with the Curzon Mayfair and now has venues in Soho, Canterbury and Sheffield.

Distribution label Curzon Artificial Eye, which celebrated its 40th anniversary last year, champions new and classic cinema from Britain, Europe and around the world.

Its catalogue includes works by Andrei Tarkovsky, Satyajit Ray, Claire Denis, Charlie Chaplin, Lynne Ramsay, Michael Haneke and Mia Hansen-Løve.

Philip Knatchbull, CEO of Curzon, said: “I’m delighted that Curzon’s contribution to film has been recognised by Bafta. Curzon has a long and proud history in the British film industry and many talented and passionate people
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Veteran’s Day Tribute: The Ten Best Navy Movies

Veteran’s Day is November 11. While we all try to escape from the most exasperating Presidential Campaign in our history let me pay tribute to the Men and Women who have served in the military to insure we keep our electoral process and our freedoms.

Having served in the Navy four years (there he goes again!) I have a keen interest in any movie about the military, especially the sea service. I did serve during peace time so had no experience with combat but still spent most of my tour of duty at sea on an aircraft carrier, the USS Amerca CV66. Among other jobs I ran the ship’s television station for almost two years. Movies have always been important to me and so providing a few hours of entertainment every day when we were at sea was just about the best job I could have had.

The author
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

‘The Spy Who Loved Me’ Making Of Doc: A Detailed Look Inside The Complicated (And Classic) 1977 Bond Film

  • Indiewire
‘The Spy Who Loved Me’ Making Of Doc: A Detailed Look Inside The Complicated (And Classic) 1977 Bond Film
It’s been nearly forty years since the tenth installment in the James Bond franchise, “The Spy Who Loved Me,” graced movie theatres everywhere, with its nefarious World War III apocalypse schemes and car-to-submarine Lotus Esprits. “The Making of the Spy Who Loved Me,” originally made for BBC Open University, packs over three hours’ worth of interviews, behind the scenes footage and sequences from the original film into a remarkable look into the production of the 1977 spy flick.

Read More: Watch: ‘The Magnificent Seven’ Documentary Details Showdown For Rights To The Classic American Western

In comparison with most of the James Bond films, “The Spy Who Loved Me” is not a direct adaptation of Ian Fleming’s original novel, and contains no similarities to the book other than the title, which the filmmakers were given permission to use by the Fleming estate. Since there was no material from which to adapt a film,
See full article at Indiewire »

Who should direct / star in the next Bond?

In not surprising news, Sam Mendes is moving on from the 007 franchise after Skyfall (2012) and Spectre (2015). Daniel Craig is probably moving on, too, but rumors about who will replace him are, as ever, premature. The names floating about this time are Idris Elba and Tom Hiddleston (wishful fan thinking, maybe, since the internet has been suggesting these two names forever) and 30 year old Jamie Bell which is an interesting idea and probably not a bad one. If chosen he'd be the youngest Bond since Sean Connery (who was 30 when he was cast for Dr. No (1962) though most subsequent Bonds have been around 40 when they started. Plus Bell is super charismatic but underused in cinema.

Though Bond films are largely regarded as producer driven and leading actor focused pictures, rather than directorial feats, the man in the chair is important. In the past the franchise has generally relied on mid level directors rather than auteurs,
See full article at FilmExperience »

Guy Hamilton Dead At Age 93; Directed Four James Bond Films And "Battle Of Britain".

  • CinemaRetro
Guy Hamilton and Roger Moore on the set of "The Man With the Golden Gun" in Thailand, 1974.

 

By Lee Pfeiffer

Cinema Retro mourns the loss of director Guy Hamilton, who has passed away at age 93. Guy was an old friend and supporter of our magazine and a wonderful talent and raconteur. Hamilton, though British by birth, spent much of his life in France. After WWII, he entered the film industry in England and served as assistant director to Sir Carol Reed, working on the classic film "The Third Man". He also served as Ad on John Huston's "The African Queen". Gradually, he moved up the ladder to director and helmed such films as "An Inspector Calls", "The Colditz Story" and "The Devil's Disciple", the latter starring Burt Lancaster, Kirk Douglas and Laurence Olivier. In 1964 Hamilton was hired to direct the third James Bond film "Goldfinger" and made cinema history.
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Review: "A Bullet For Joey" (1955) Starring Edward G. Robinson And George Raft; Blu-ray Edition From Kino Lorber

  • CinemaRetro
By John M. Whalen

A Bullet for Joey” (1955) with Edward G. Robinson, George Raft and Audrey Totter is one of those “Red scare” movies from the mid-fifties that combines elements of a crime plot with espionage and the evils of communism. It was the Cold War era and people were digging bomb shelters and practicing “duck and cover” air raid drills, while at the same time, congressional committees hauled in suspected Communist Party members, including actors, writers and directors, to testify and name names. Hollywood did its part, in turn, by black listing suspected commies and turning out anti-communism films like John Wayne’s “Big Jim McClain” “The Woman on Pier 13 (“I Married a Communist”), and “I Was a Communist for the FBI.” “A Bullet for Joey”, despite having two of Hollywood’s toughest tough guy actors in the cast, is one of the weaker examples of this sub-genre.
See full article at CinemaRetro »

BAFTA to honour Angels Costumes

  • ScreenDaily
Costume house that has serviced films from Hitchcock to Hammer and Harry Potter to receive honourary BAFTA.

Angels Costumes is to receive the Outstanding British Contribution to Cinema Award at the Ee British Academy Film Awards ceremony at London’s Royal Opera House on Feb 14.

Now in its 175th year, Angels Costumes is the world’s longest-established and largest professional costume house, and has worked with film luminaries including Alfred Hitchcock, Powell and Pressburger, David Lean, Martin Scorsese, and Steven Spielberg on features from the Ealing Comedies, films produced by Gainsborough Studios and Hammer, to the Carry On films, Bond, Star Wars, Pirates of the Caribbean, and Harry Potter.

The Outstanding British Contribution to Cinema Award is presented annually in honour of film producer Michael Balcon and previous recipients include Mike Leigh, Kenneth Branagh, Derek Jarman, Mary Selway, Ridley and Tony Scott, Working Title Films, Lewis Gilbert, the Harry Potter series of films, John Hurt, [link
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Best James Bond Scenes: The Roger Moore era part 1: 1970s

  • SoundOnSight
It is no secret that Roger Moore holds the record as the actor who played James Bond the most, his tally an impressing 7. There are a bevy of reasons why this was the case, the most obvious being that each one of his films were massive financial successes, the only bump in the road being his second outing, The Man With the Golden Gun, which itself speaks to the immense stature of the franchise when the film that earns 97 million dollars is the ‘bump in the road.’ There was a shift in tone that permeated in the Bond films once Roger Moore took over the mantle from Sean Connery. Whereas the latter brought toughness and grittiness to his interpretation of the famous super spy all the while proving to be as smooth as butter, the former injected some light comedic flair. It was definitely still James Bond on the screen,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

‘Moonraker’ Delivers Bond to a Post ‘Star Wars’ Generation

  • SoundOnSight
Moonraker

Directed by Lewis Gilbert

Screenplay by Christopher Wood

UK, 1979

Moonraker has the unique distinction of being the most absurd and over-the-top Bond film produced in 50 years of the series. Spy films exist in a genre unto themselves, but the Bond films sometimes like to crossover into other popular genres as well. The first clear example of this was 1973’s Live and Let Die, which mimicked the then popular Blaxploitation genre. When Moonraker was released however, the Bond series took this genre crossover to its extreme, resulting in a Bond film as much a science fiction saga as it is screwball comedy. Certainly one of the strangest Bond films to date, Moonraker holds a unique admiration among Bond fans and remained the highest grossing of all the Bond films until the release of Goldeneye in 1995.

Before Moonraker came 1977’s The Spy Who Loved Me which concluded with the end credit
See full article at SoundOnSight »

‘The Spy Who Loved Me’ is a thrilling showcase of Roger Moore’s turn as the Mi-6 agent

  • SoundOnSight
The Spy Who Loved Me

Directed by Lewis Gilbert

Screenplay by Christopher Wood and Richard Maibaum

UK, 1977

There’s an undeniable lasting appeal to Bond. Lasting 50 years is certainly proof of that, but there’s something deeper. After all, one can point to Star Trek and Doctor Who as cultural icons that have stood the test of time, but there’s something different about Bond. Trekkies or Whovians faced ostracization for many years, the fans relegated to dark corners and hushed tones of conversation. Ordering a vodka martini, shaken not stirred, however, paints someone as the very opposite of a nerd, something that has never changed throughout the run of Bond. So what stands Bond apart? It can’t be the saving the world aspect of things; after all, there are many heroes and heroines who’ve saved the world on a regular basis, perhaps with more frequency than Bond,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

‘You Only Live Twice’ – an incredulous plot but an influential Bond film

  • SoundOnSight
You Only Live Twice

Directed by Lewis Gilbert

Written by Roald Dahl

1967, UK

Easily the most parodied of all the James Bond films, You Only Live Twice is the fourth film starring Sean Connery as 007. After five years portraying the secret agent, it took producers Albert R. Broccoli and Harry Saltzman (as well as an increased fee) to persuade Connery to become Bond once more, before the five-year hiatus before his last official outing, Diamonds Are Forever.

You Only Live Twice is a completely different story in comparison to Ian Fleming’s original novel, as the film sees numerous manned spacecraft disappearing from orbit, with Russia and USA blaming each other during the Cold War. After faking his death, Bond travels to Japan to join forces with Japanese Secret Service to investigate and meets the head of Spectre, Ernst Stavro Blofeld.

First off, there is one certain inconsistency that dents
See full article at SoundOnSight »

The Death of Marilyn Monroe, The Birth of James Bond

  • SoundOnSight
Editor’s Note: This article was originally published November 1, 2012.

Fifty years ago this month, Marilyn Monroe passed away from a suspected accidental drug overdose (although conspiracy geeks love to contemplate more nefarious scenarios). The commemoratives are already showing up on magazine and newspaper entertainment pages, cable channels have announced their Marilyn film fests and documentary tributes. There’s little of worth I can add either in academic consideration or aesthetic appreciation to all the testimonials as well as the previous fifty years of ruminating in print and on film re: the lasting appeal of La Monroe. I can only wonder, with a sort of melancholy amazement, over the fact we’re still talking about her all these years later.

That persistent hold she has on popular culture is a fascinating study in itself. Her career had already been faltering when she died, she’s been gone a half-century, yet there
See full article at SoundOnSight »
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