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Come Fly With Me

Dolores Hart, Pamela Tiffin and Lois Nettleton are flight attendants aiming to snag three attractive, wealthy husbands right out of the air -- Karl Boehm, Hugh O'Brien and Karl Malden. There's more social comment in this 'coffee, tea or me' romantic comedy than can be found in a graduate thesis about the sexual habits of liberated stewardesses. And Hey, Frankie Avalon warbles the classy title tune! Come Fly with Me DVD-r The Warner Archive Collection 1963 / Color / 2:35 enhanced widescreen / 109 min. / Street Date June 30, 2015 / available through the WBshop / 18.49 Starring Dolores Hart, Hugh O'Brian, Karlheinz Bohm, Pamela Tiffin, Lois Nettleton, Karl Malden, Dawn Addams, Richard Wattis, Andrew Cruickshank, James Dobson, Lois Maxwell, John Crawford, Robert Easton, Maurice Marsac, George Coulouris, Ferdy Mayne. Cinematography Oswald Morris Film Editor Frank Clarke Original Music Lyn Murray Written by William Roberts from a book by Bernard Glemser Produced by Anatole De Grunwald Directed by Henry Levin

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

What?
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Deep in My Heart

The gaudy MGM musical bio gets one last go-round, gathering an all-star cast to illustrate the songbook of composer Sigmund Romberg. Gene Kelly dances with his brother Fred, and Cyd Charisse does a hot number with James Mitchell, while star José Ferrer goes on stage to perform with his wife Rosemary Clooney. Deep in My Heart Blu-ray Warner Archive Collection 1954 / Color / 1:37 flat Academy / 132 min. / Street Date November 10, 2015 / available through the WBshop / 17.95 Starring José Ferrer, Merle Oberon, Helen Traubel, Doe Avedon, Walter Pidgeon, Jim Backus, Rosemary Clooney, Gene Kelly, Fred Kelly, Jane Powell, Ann Miller, Cyd Charisse, Howard Keel, Vic Damone, Tony Martin, Joan Weldon, Fred Kelly, Russ Tamblyn. Susan Luckey, Robert Easton, Barrie Chase, Douglas Fowley. Cinematography George J. Folsey Film Editor Adrienne Fazan Original Music Alexander Courage, Adolph Deutsch Written by Leonard Spigelgass from a book by Elliott Arnold Produced by Roger Edens Directed by Stanley Donen

Reviewed
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

The Giant Spider Invasion – The Blu Review

Wisconson-based regional filmmaker Bill Rebane’s no-budget wonder ($300k to be exact) The Giant Spider Invasion was a hilariously cheesy 1975 throwback to the giant-monster flicks of the 50s, a trend then enjoying a revival with films like Empire Of The Ants and Food Of The Gods. This outrageous mix of giant monster motifs and backwoods sleaze plays like a hybrid of Tarantula and The Blob with its mixture of giant spiders and falling meteors. I saw The Giant Spider Invasion at the long-shuttered Ellisville Cinema in West St. Louis County (on a double bill with the David Niven vampire comedy Old Dracula). I recall the poster in the lobby which featured a gargantuan spider bearing down on a group of terrified people. In the air above the mega-arachnid was three helicopters and lying crumpled at the spider’s legs were burning cars as spotlights filled the sky. One of the
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Sold! Miley Cyrus Parts Ways With Luxe Toluca Lake Family Mansion for $6 Million—Check Out the Pics!

Sold! Miley Cyrus Parts Ways With Luxe Toluca Lake Family Mansion for $6 Million—Check Out the Pics!
Going, going, gone! After listing her family's Toluca Lake Mansion for $5.995 million back in January, Miley Cyrus' massive pad is officially off the market. Nestled behind walls and hedges for ample privacy, Miley and her fam enjoyed the 8,700 square-foot home for just under eight years. Designed by esteemed architect Bob Easton, the Tuscan-inspired home features six bedrooms and seven baths set amidst a spacious 8,700 square feet. But that's nothing compared to the whopping 26,939-square-foot lot on which the property sits. Amongst a backyard skateboard ramp and a romantic Juliet balcony, the property also comes with plenty of Cyrus-family history. Note, this is the same house in which two...
See full article at E! Online »

Interview: Lesley Ann Warren on the 30th Anniversary of "Victor Victoria" and the Upcoming "Clue" Mini-Reunion

Victor Victoria, the adventurously frank, bawdy, and hilarious musical starring Julie Andrews as a poor singer who becomes the toast of Paris when she reinvents herself as gay Polish female impersonator Count Victor Grazinski, turns 30 this year, which officially validates its timelessness. The Blake Edwards-directed romp is equal parts farce and social commentary, and it features unforgettable performances by Robert Preston as Victoria's gay mentor Carroll "Toddy" Todd, James Garner as nightclub owner King Marchard, and perhaps most notably, Lesley Ann Warren as the squeaky, naughty, and hysterical showgirl Norma Cassady. Norma is Judy Holliday on a horny sugar high, and that coquettish insanity earned Warren a Best Supporting Actress nomination at the '82 Oscars.

The most famous projects in Warren's oeuvre are as extreme and unpredictable as Norma herself. As a teenager, Warren played the titular naif in Rodgers and Hammerstein's '65 TV version of Cinderella
See full article at The Backlot »

The Giant Spider Invasion – A Retrospective

A 35-minute cut of The Giant Spider Invasion will be shown on Super-8 sound film at Super-8 Giant Monster Movie Madness next Tuesday, May 1st at The Way Out Club in St. Louis.

Wisconson-based regional filmmaker Bill Rebane’s no-budget wonder The Giant Spider Invasion was a hilariously cheesy 1975 throwback to the giant-monster flicks of the 50s, a trend then enjoying a revival with films like Empire Of The Ants and Food Of The Gods. This outrageous mix of giant monster motifs and backwoods sleaze plays like a hybrid of Tarantula and The Blob with its mixture of giant spiders and falling meteors. I saw The Giant Spider Invasion at the long-shuttered Ellisville Cinema in West St. Louis County (on a double bill with the David Niven vampire comedy Old Dracula). I recall the poster in the lobby which featured a gargantuan spider bearing down on a group of terrified people.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Robert Easton, Legendary Dialect Coach, Dead At 81

  • CinemaRetro
Robert Easton's name may not be familiar to the public but for decades he has been the "go-to" guy for prominent actors who needed to master the art of speaking in different dialects. Easton started out as a character actor but feared that his southern accent would keep him typecast as hillbillies. He began to study regional accents and foreign languages and discovered he had an uncanny knack for not only mastering them, but for teaching them as well. In short order, he became a real life Henry Higgins, teaching such diverse talents as Charlton Heston, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Robert Duvall, Robert VaughnAnne Hathaway and Forest Whitaker. As recently as a couple of weeks ago, he completed working with John Travolta on a project. Easton died this week of undisclosed causes at age 81. All the while, Easton worked as a supporting player and appeared in dozens of prominent films
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Top Hollywood Dialect Coach Easton Dies

  • WENN
Top Hollywood Dialect Coach Easton Dies
The renowned Hollywood dialect coach who helped Forest Whitaker hone his accent as Ugandan dictator Idi Amin in The Last King Of Scotland has died.

Character actor and language expert Robert Easton passed away from natural causes at his home in Toluca Lake, Los Angeles last Friday at the age of 81.

Easton began his career as an actor and landed roles on TV shows such as The Munsters, Get Smart and The Adventures of Superman and in films like 1961's Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea and Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country in 1991.

But he became famed for his skills as a phoneticist and was regularly referred to as the Henry Higgins of Hollywood, in reference to the strict speech tutor in My Fair Lady.

As a dialect coach, Easton taught actors including Arnold Schwarzenegger, Liam Neeson, Sir Ben Kingsley and Anne Hathaway, while his work on 2006's The Last King of Scotland landed Whitaker the Oscar for Best Actor.

Easton continued to work right up until his death, even recording a speech tape for John Travolta to use for an upcoming project.

His daughter Heather Woodruff Perry tells the Los Angeles Times, "A month ago, he did an entire script on tape for John Travolta."

Paying tribute to the veteran, Robert Duvall, who worked with Easton on Gods and Generals in 2003, says, "They (film producers) said, 'We want Virginia accents'. Bob said, 'Which one? There are 12 distinct accents, from the Piedmont to the ocean.' He knew them all.

"He was a wonderful man, a very unique personality, and a master at his craft."

Dialect Coach Robert Easton Dies: Henry Higgins of Hollywood Coached Anne Hathaway, Arnold Schwarzenegger, John Travolta

Actor and dialect coach Robert Easton, known as the "Henry Higgins of Hollywood," died of "natural causes" on Friday, Dec. 16, in the Los Angeles suburb of Toluca Lake. Easton was 81. Even if he never coached My Fair Lady/Pygmalion's Audrey Hepburn, Julie Andrews, or Wendy Hiller, according to the Los Angeles Times obituary Easton's dialect students included Anne Hathaway, Liam Neeson, John Travolta, Patrick Swayze, Ben Kingsley, Charlton Heston, Arnold Schwarzenegger (who learned to talk with a Russian accent, as per the Times), and Forest Whitaker, who learned to talk like Idi Amin Dada for his Oscar-winning role in The Last King of Scotland. When not coaching, Easton taught at UCLA and USC. Additionally, he had small supporting roles in movies such as Joshua Logan's Paint Your Wagon (1969), starring Clint Eastwood, Lee Marvin, and Jean Seberg; Mike Nichols' Working Girl (1988), with Melanie Griffith, Sigourney Weaver, and Harrison Ford
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Hollywood Dialect Coach Passes Away

Hollywood Dialect Coach Passes Away
Los Angeles -- Character actor and Hollywood dialect coach Robert Easton, whose successes include teaching Forest Whitaker to speak like Idi Amin in the 2006 movie "The Last King of Scotland," has died in Los Angeles. He was 81.

His movie credits include "Paint Your Wagon," "Pete's Dragon," "Pet Sematary II" and "Primary Colors."

When he was younger, he mainly played country bumpkins on TV shows because of his Southern drawl.

He feared being typecast so he worked on different accents and learned he could mimic regional speech patterns.

As a dialect coach, he worked Arnold Schwarzenegger, Charlton Heston, Liam Neeson, Anne Hathaway and Robert Duvall.
See full article at Huffington Post »

Interview: Robert Duvall and Sissy Spacek dish on how to ‘Get Low’

By Todd Gilchrist

hollywoodnews.com: Although he’s just shy of 80, Robert Duvall seems as active as he did when he started his acting career some 50 years ago: from Boo Radley in To Kill a Mockingbird to Felix Bush in Get Low, Duvall has played every variety of cultured, ignorant, aggressive, deferential, poetic, blustery character you can imagine, and shows no signs of slowing down. In Get Low, his latest, he’s commanding the screen as a bearded, eccentric recluse who emerges from self-imposed exile to enlist a funeral director and his assistant for a living funeral – as in one for himself that he wants to attend while he’s still around.

Hollywood News joined a small group of press Wednesday to talk to Duvall and his co-star, Sissy Spacek, about this idiosyncratic little film. In addition to talking about the appeal of Felix Bush, both actors examined their approach to playing various roles,
See full article at Hollywoodnews.com »

Robert Duvall and Sissy Spacek Interview Get Low

To get Get Low off the ground, the filmmakers knew they would need a highly skillful and creative actor in the lead role of Felix – someone capable of making a character who seems right out of a backwoods fable feel palpably real and alive. They found that quality in Robert Duvall, one of America’s most diverse and respected actors, and winner of the Academy Award for his performance as a broken-down country singer trying to turn his life around in Bruce Beresford’s Tender Mercies.

Sissy Spacek, an Oscar winner for her incisive portrait of Loretta Lynn in Coal Miner’s Daughter and whose work has been a staple of modern American filmmaking, was another important casting choice for the role of the strong, independent widow, Maddie, the old flame who thinks she is the only person on earth to have ever loved Felix, only to discover the terrible
See full article at Collider.com »

Cinematical (Double-o) Seven: Ways They Almost Killed 007

I guess he'll die another way, to paraphrase Madonna's lousy theme song for the 20th Bond movie. Bond's survival of baroque death traps has been mocked on screen all the way back to 1965, when the noted character actor Robert Easton had the following line as a fruity-accented Bond type in The Loved One: "I think it could be dicey if he decides to use the giant squid." There was a giant octopus in the novel of Dr. No, though no villain ever actually employed sharks with laser helmets as in the Austin Powers films. However, there had been a planned robot shark in the kinda-non canonical Bond adventure Never Say Never Again. Our hero has dealt with seven especially exotic murder weapons over the years:

1. Death by giant yo-yo: Octopussy (1983) Resting after an exhausting shag with Maud Adams, Commander Bond (Roger Moore) is awakened by the sudden arrival in
See full article at Cinematical »

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