News

Canon Of Film: ‘Murder on the Orient Express’ (1974)

In this week’s edition of Canon Of Film, we take a look Sidney Lumet‘s hypnotic ‘Murder on the Orient Express‘ just in time for the release of Kenneth Branagh‘s remake of the same name. For the story behind the genesis of the Canon, you can click here.

Murder On The Orient Express (1974)

Director: Sidney Lumet

Screenplay: Paul Dehn based on the novel by Agatha Christie (uncredited)

Strangely, the detective story is actually a fairly newer genre when compared to others, in terms of literary history, it is, and the inventor of the genre is not who you’d think it’d be either, it was Edgar Allen Poe, with his trilogy of C. Auguste Dupin stories, ‘The Murder of the Rue Morgue‘, ‘The Mystery of Marie Roget,’ and my favorite, ‘The Purloined Letter‘ back in the 1840s. I’m not sure why this genre didn’t pick up until then,
See full article at Age of the Nerd »

The Sound of Fear: 17 Creepy Choral Horror Soundtracks

Benjamin Wallfisch’s brilliantly sinister It score turns the human voice inside out – and it’s not the only one…

The world’s most terrifying clown Pennywise is back to stalk our nightmares in the new adaptation of It, on release now. Bill Skarsgard takes over from Tim Curry as the dreaded Stephen King creation and director Andy Muschietti’s movie has been praised for mixing genuine terror with Stand By Me levels of pathos.

It also marks the latest in a series of increasingly impressive chiller scores by British composer Benjamin Wallfisch. Having charged the likes of Lights Out, A Cure for Wellness and the recent Annabelle: Creation with a potent sense of musical fear, Wallfisch now scares the pants off us with his impressively creepy It soundtrack.

Sitting alongside some truly beautiful and tender material for our pre-teen heroes the Losers’ Club is an ear-shattering array of discordant horror techniques.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

The Beautiful and the Damned Dirty Apes: A History of The Planet of The Apes

Author: Cai Ross

The original Planet of The Apes movies occupied a curious netherworld of critical opinion. With each film, the budget was sawn in half, leading to a successive pattern of diminishing returns that led to a cheapening of its esteem. The spin-off TV show was quickly cancelled, further dulling the lustre and few people even remember the animated series that finally put the Apes to bed until a rude awakening in 2001.

However, for all their child-pleasing capers (the family-friendly G rating was a mandatory stipulation from the studios), the Apes movies deftly juggled important themes and arguments about slavery, free-will, nuclear war, vivisection, racism and oppression, and man’s innate capacity for cruelty. In pure storytelling terms, the circuitous plot links the first five movies (and the new post-Rise cycle) into a pleasing, if relentlessly pessimistic, self-perpetuating full-circle.

Enormous box office successes in their early stages, they spawned
See full article at HeyUGuys »

John le Carré’s ‘The Spy Who Came in From the Cold’ to Be Adapted for TV By Paramount TV, The Ink Factory

John le Carré’s ‘The Spy Who Came in From the Cold’ to Be Adapted for TV By Paramount TV, The Ink Factory
Octogenarian novelist John le Carré is enjoying quite a surge in popularity these days: Paramount Television and The Ink Factory have just put le Carré’s novel “The Spy Who Came in From the Cold” into development for TV. Character 7 will also assist with the financing and production.

Le Carré’s seminal 1963 novel was already adapted for the screen, an Oscar-nominated 1965 film Paul Dehn wrote for Paramount, and he’ll serve as an executive producer on the TV project. The Ink Factory’s Stephen and Simon Cornwell will executive produce as well, along with Character 7’s Stephen Garrett.

Simon Beaufoy, who penned Oscar-winner “Slumdog Millionaire,” will write. “Adapting one of the best thrillers ever written is a rare privilege,” he said.

The story centers on British intelligence operative Alec Leamas, the titular spy who adopts the guise of a turncoat to wreak vengeance on the East German Intelligence Service deputy director responsible for the death of one
See full article at Variety - TV News »

'The Spy Who Came In From The Cold' heads to TV

  • ScreenDaily
'The Spy Who Came In From The Cold' heads to TV
On the back of Emmy-nominated BBC and AMC series The Night Manager, The Ink Factory announced on Wednesday it would partner with Paramount TV on the latest John le Carré spy thriller.

The Ink Factory will finance and produce the limited television series in association with Paramount Television and Character 7. Paramount Worldwide Television Licensing & Distribution will handle worldwide distribution outside the UK.

The Ink Factory’s Stephen Cornwell and Simon Cornwell – le Carré’s sons – will serve as executive producers alongside Character 7’s Stephen Garrett and the author himself.

Simon Beaufoy will write the adaptation set within the shadow of the Berlin Wall as a British spy embarks on a revenge mission.

Paramount released a 1965 feature adaptation of The Spy Who Came In From The Cold starring Richard Burton in 1965. Carré and Paul Dehn adapted that version.

“On the heels of The Night Manager, we look forward to developing a further le Carré novel for a global
See full article at ScreenDaily »

The Best James Bond Films

Back in 2012, our staff decided to group together and come up with a list of the best films in the 007, James Bond franchise. With Spectre rolling out this weekend, we decided to republish the article. Let us know which is your favourite, and be sure to check out our review of Spectre here.

#1: From Russia With Love

Directed by Terence Young

Written by Richard Maibaum and Johanna Harwood

1963, UK

50 years later, and with twenty three “official” entries, From Russia With Love represents the very best of the Bond franchise. Skyfall is the closest to be considered, at best – almost equal to what was achieved in ’64 – but From Russia With Love is still unparalleled. Although it is the second in the series, and although it feels like no Bond film that followed, it is the film that solidifies all the Bond elements into a formula – a template that carries on,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

‘Goldfinger’ – 24 carat quality

Goldfinger

Directed by Guy Hamilton

Screenplay by Richard Maibaum and Paul Dehn

Starred: Sean Connery, Honor Blackman

Released September 1964 by United Artists

Even if you had never seen this film, just as with Ursula Andress rising from the waves like a bikini-clad version of Botticelli’s Venus in Dr. No, you’d recognize the iconic image. The girl, the bed, the gold paint. The sight of gilded Shirley Eaton spread out on the sheets is so evocative that – like Ursula – it was subjected to an ironic nod in a later Bond film. If Halle Berry wore the updated bikini in Die Another Day, instead of gold Gemma Arterton did sheet-duty wearing nothing but a coat of oil for Quantum of Solace.

Gold was the symbol of wealth in 1964, but in today’s world of global warming and fuel station queues, hydrocarbons have taken its place in the cultural lexicon. And
See full article at SoundOnSight »

200 Greatest Horror Films (20-11)



20. The Innocents

Directed by Jack Clayton

Written by William Archibald and Truman Capote

UK, 1961

Genre: Hauntings

The Innocents, which was co-written by Truman Capote, is the first of many screen adaptations of The Turn of the Screw. If you’ve never heard of it, don’t feel bad because most people haven’t – but The Innocents deserves its rightful spot on any list of great horror films. Here is one of the few films where the ghost story takes place mostly in daylight, and the lush photography, which earned cinematographer Freddie Francis one of his two Oscar wins, is simply stunning. Meanwhile, director Jack Clayton and Francis made great use of long, steady shots, which suggest corruption is lurking everywhere inside the grand estate. The Innocents also features three amazing performances; the first two come courtesy of child actors Pamela Franklin (The Legend of Hell House), and Martin Stephens (Village of the Damned
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Seven Anti-James Bond Movies You Haven’t Seen

The Bond franchise which has been with us so long, has become so deeply entrenched in popular culture, that we often forget what it was that first distinguished the Bonds a half-century ago. Skyfall might be one of the best of the Bonds, and even, arguably, one of the best big-budget big-action flicks to come along in quite a while, but it’s not alone. The annual box office is – and has been, for quite some time – dominated by big, action-packed blockbusters of one sort of another. The Bonds aren’t even the only action-driven spy flicks (Mr. James Bond, I’d like you to meet Mr. Jason Bourne and Mr. Ethan Hunt).

That’s not to take anything away from the superb entertainment Skyfall is, or the sentimentally treasured place the Bonds hold. It’s only to say that where there was once just the one, there are now many.
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Human See, Human Do: A Complete History of 'Planet of the Apes'

Human See, Human Do: A Complete History of 'Planet of the Apes'
A pop-culture touchstone, a nearly all-purpose metaphor and one of the most beloved sci-fi franchises of the Seventies and beyond, the Planet of the Apes films do what all good what-if fantasies should do: hold up a mirror to humanity and reflect our own conflicts, issues and failings back to us through a wildly outrageous premise. The original 1968 movie mixes satire, social commentary, action and suspense, capped by a first-rate twist at the end. ("Damn you, damn you all to hell!")

'Dawn of the Planet of the Apes'
See full article at Rolling Stone »

The Poirot Collection: Blu-ray box set

(Sidney Lumet, John Guillermin, Guy Hamilton, 1974-82; StudioCanal, PG)

The production partnership of John Brabourne (the Eton-educated seventh Baron Brabourne) and Richard B Goodwin (who started out as a teenage tea boy with the Rank Organisation) is one of the most interesting in the British cinema. Its highlights include David Lean's A Passage to India and the two-part Little Dorrit, but its most popular works were the period Agatha Christie pictures that brought all-star casting and unfashionably high production values to the whodunit and set new standards for the string of TV productions that followed. Brabourne's father-in-law Lord Mountbatten helped secure the rights from Dame Agatha, and the three best are the Hercule Poirot mysteries in this Blu-ray set. Ustinov plays the Belgian sleuth both in John Guillermin's Death on the Nile (1978), scripted by Anthony Shaffer and superbly photographed by Jack Cardiff, and in Guy Hamilton's bland
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

31 Days of Horror: 100 Greatest Horror Films: Top 50

Every year, we here at Sound On Sight celebrate the month of October with 31 Days of Horror; and every year, I update the list of my favourite horror films ever made. Last year, I released a list that included 150 picks. This year, I’ll be upgrading the list, making minor alterations, changing the rankings, adding new entries, and possibly removing a few titles. I’ve also decided to publish each post backwards this time for one reason: the new additions appear lower on my list, whereas my top 50 haven’t changed much, except for maybe in ranking. Enjoy!

****

Special Mention:

Shock Corridor

Written and directed by Samuel Fuller

USA, 1963

Shock Corridor stars Peter Breck as Johnny Barrett, an ambitious reporter who wants to expose the killer at the local insane asylum. To solve the case, he must pretend to be insane so they have him committed. Once in the asylum,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Seven Anti-007 Movies You Haven’t Seen

(*My apologies for this coming so long after Sound on Sight’s celebration of 50 years of James Bond, but I’ve been swamped with end-of-semester work and only just now managed to finish this. Hope you all still find this of interest.)

As a coda to the Sos’s James Bond salute, there’s still a point I think deserves to be made.

The Bond franchise which has been with us so long, has become so deeply entrenched in popular culture, that we often forget what it was that first distinguished the Bonds a half-century ago. Skyfall might be one of the best of the Bonds, and even, arguably, one of the best big-budget big-action flicks to come along in quite a while, but it’s not alone. The annual box office is – and has been, for quite some time – dominated by big, action-packed blockbusters of one sort of another.
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Nine Best James Bond Films

Concluding a very successful James bond marathon, comes our list of the very best 007 films, as chosen by the Sound On Sight staff. In just 30 days, we managed to publish over 40 articles and reviews, making it our most successful monthly movie club to date. I’d like to once again thank everyone who participated and furthermore, thank everyone who voted for having good taste. I cannot argue with the final results. These are indeed the best Bond films. Enjoy!

#1: From Russia With Love

Directed by Terence Young

Written by Richard Maibaum and Johanna Harwood

1963, UK

50 years later, and with twenty three “official” entries, From Russia With Love represents the very best of the Bond franchise. Skyfall is the closest to be considered, at best – almost equal to what was achieved in ’64 – but From Russia With Love is still unparalleled. Although it is the second in the series, and although
See full article at SoundOnSight »

50 Years of Bond: ‘Goldfinger’ – 24 carat quality

Goldfinger

Directed by: Guy Hamilton

Screenplay by: Richard Maibaum and Paul Dehn

Starred: Sean Connery, Honor Blackman

Released September 1964 by United Artists

Even if you had never seen this film, just as with Ursula Andress rising from the waves like a bikini-clad version of Botticelli’s Venus in Dr No, you’d recognize the iconic image. The girl, the bed, the gold paint. The sight of gilded Shirley Eaton spread out on the sheets is so evocative that – like Ursula – it was subjected to an ironic nod in a later Bond film. If Halle Berry wore the updated bikini in Die Another Day, instead of gold Gemma Arterton did sheet-duty wearing nothing but a coat of oil for Quantum of Solace.

Gold was the symbol of wealth in 1964, but in today’s world of global warming and fuel station queues, hydrocarbons have taken its place in the cultural lexicon. And
See full article at SoundOnSight »

100 + Greatest Horror Movies (pt.6) 25-1

Throughout the month of October, Editor-in-Chief and resident Horror expert Ricky D, will be posting a list of his favorite Horror films of all time. The list will be posted in six parts. Click here to see every entry.

As with all lists, this is personal and nobody will agree with every choice – and if you do, that would be incredibly disturbing. It was almost impossible for me to rank them in order, but I tried and eventually gave up.

****

Special Mention:

Shock Corridor

Directed by Samuel Fuller

Written by Samuel Fuller

1963, USA

Shock Corridor stars Peter Breck as Johnny Barrett, an ambitious reporter who wants to expose the killer at the local insane asylum. In order to solve the case, he must pretend to be insane so they have him committed. Once in the asylum, Barrett sets to work, interrogating the other patients and keeping a close eye on the staff.
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Countdown to Skyfall - Goldfinger (1964)

Flickering Myth's writing team count down to the release of Skyfall by discussing their favourite James Bond films; next up is Simon Columb with Goldfinger...

The 1001 Movies To See Before You Dieonly lists one James Bond adventure: Sandwiched between Joseph Losey's The Servant and Kenneth Anger’s Scorpio Rising sits, awkwardly, Goldfinger. Kim Newman finishes his brief article on the film by stating that “Ever since, the series has been recycling”. Maybe so, but what a formula they created! Guy Hamilton, directing his first film in the series, managed to combine the cool of From Russia with Love with new, innovative elements - gadgets that were more than a briefcase, and an introduction that was simply unforgettable. Is it a duck? No, it’s James Bond. He is wearing a tuxedo underneath his wetsuit. Is this impossible? Not for 007.

This is the most iconic James Bond adventure – and the one film which,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

The Films Of Sidney Lumet: A Retrospective

It has been a year since Sidney Lumet passed away on April 9, 2011. Here is our retrospective on the legendary filmmaker to honor his memory. Originally published April 15, 2011.

Almost a week after the fact, we, like everyone that loves film, are still mourning the passing of the great American master Sidney Lumet, one of the true titans of cinema.

Lumet was never fancy. He never needed to be, as a master of blocking, economic camera movements and framing that empowered the emotion and or exact punctuation of a particular scene. First and foremost, as you’ve likely heard ad nauseum -- but hell, it’s true -- Lumet was a storyteller, and one that preferred his beloved New York to soundstages (though let's not romanticize it too much, he did his fair share of work on studio film sets too as most TV journeyman and early studio filmmakers did).

His directing career stretched well over 50 years,
See full article at The Playlist »

James Bond Declassified: File #3 - 'Goldfinger' takes the series into the realm of pop cartoon

  • Hitfix
James Bond Declassified: File #3 - 'Goldfinger' takes the series into the realm of pop cartoon
James Bond 007 Declassified File #3: "Goldfinger" This series will trace the cinema history of James Bond, while also examining Ian Fleming's original novels as source material and examining how faithful (or not) the films have been to his work. Directed by Guy Hamilton Screenplay by Richard Maibaum & Paul Dehn Produced by Albert R. Broccoli and Harry Saltzman Characters / Cast James Bond / Sean Connery Pussy Galore / Honor Blackman Auric Goldfinger / Gert Frobe Jill Masterson / Shirley Eaton Tilly Masterson / Tania Mallet Oddjob / Harold Sakata M / Bernard Lee Solo / Martin Benson Felix Leiter...
See full article at Hitfix »

James Bond Retrospective: Goldfinger (1964)

As James Bond prepares for his 23rd official outing in Skyfall and to mark next year’s 50th Anniversary of one of the most successful movie franchises of all time I have been tasked to take a retrospective look at the films that turned author Ian Fleming’s creation into one of the most recognised and iconic characters in film history.

When the second James Bond film From Russia With Love managed to top the box-office receipts of Dr. No, producers Albert R. Broccoli and Harry Saltzman knew they had struck gold with the character. Looking to expand the appeal of the next film to a more worldwide audience, in particular the American market, they chose Fleming’s seventh Bond novel Goldfinger as the third film in their series. With much of the story taking place in the American states of Kentucky and Florida as well as Switzerland and the
See full article at Obsessed with Film »
loading
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Credited With | External Sites