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IFC Films Acquires Paul Dano’s ‘Wildlife’ — Sundance 2018

IFC Films Acquires Paul Dano’s ‘Wildlife’ — Sundance 2018
North American rights to “Wildlife,” Paul Dano’s first film as a writer-director, have been scooped up by IFC Films. Dano and fiancée Zoe Kazan adapted the film from the novel of the same name by Pulitzer Prize-winner Richard Ford. Set in Great Falls, Montana during 1960, the film premiered as part of the U.S. Dramatic Competition at the Sundance Film Festival on January 20. A Fall 2018 release is planned.

“For as long as I have wanted to make films, I have known I would make films about family,” said Dano in a statement. “To have brought together a creative family in the making of ‘Wildlife’ has been one of the great joys of my life. And now to extend that family further and collaborate with IFC, whose voice as a distributor has been vital to so many filmmakers I love all over the world, is an honor.”

Kazan also shared
See full article at Indiewire »

Paul Dano’s ‘Wildlife’ Acquired By IFC Films After Sundance Bow

Paul Dano’s ‘Wildlife’ Acquired By IFC Films After Sundance Bow
Paul Dano’s directorial debt Wildlife, the family drama that had its world premiere at last month’s Sundance Film Festival, has sold to IFC Films for North American rights. Carey Mulligan, Jake Gyllenhaal, Ed Oxenbould and Bill Camp star in the pic Dano and Zoe Kazan adapted from Richard Ford's novel. IFC says it is eyeing a fall 2018 theatrical release and awards campaign. The plot centers on 14-year-old Joe, the only child of Jeanette and Jerry—a housewife and a golf…
See full article at Deadline »

IFC Films Buys Jake Gyllenhaal, Carey Mulligan’s ‘Wildlife’

IFC Films has nabbed U.S. and Canada rights to Paul Dano’s directorial debut, “Wildlife,” following its world premiere at the Sundance Film Festival.

The film is an adaptation of a Richard Ford short story of the same name. “Wildlife” follows the collapse of a marriage in 1960s Montana. The dissolution of the family is observed by the couple’s 14-year-old son. Oscar nominees Carey Mulligan and Jake Gyllenhaal star alongside Ed Oxenbould (“Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day”) and Bill Camp (“The Night Of”). Gyllenhaal also serves as a producer.

In a positive notice, Variety‘s Owen Gleiberman praised the first-time filmmaker.

“Dano, it’s immediately clear, is a natural-born filmmaker, with an eye for elegant spare compositions that refrain from being too showy; they rarely get in the way of the story he’s telling,” he wrote in his review.

“Wildlife” was adapted for the screen by Dano and his
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Jake Gyllenhaal, Carey Mulligan Drama ‘Wildlife’ Sells to IFC Films

  • The Wrap
Jake Gyllenhaal, Carey Mulligan Drama ‘Wildlife’ Sells to IFC Films
Paul Dano’s directorial debut “Wildlife” has been acquired by IFC Films for its U.S. and Canadian rights, the distributor announced Monday.

The Sundance hit stars Jake Gyllenhaal, Carey Mulligan, Bill Camp and Ed Oxenbould. Gyllenhaal also stars as producer.

“Wildlife” was adapted for the screen by Dano and Zoe Kazan from Richard Ford’s acclaimed novel. The film was produced by Alex Saks of June Pictures, Dano, Oren Moverman of Sight Unseen Pictures, Ann Ruark and Nine Stories’ Gyllenhaal and Riva Marker, with Zoe Kazan, Ted Deiker and Eddie Vaisman serving as executive producers.
See full article at The Wrap »

Jake Gyllenhaal joins Zendaya and Ansel Elgort on crime thriller, Finest Kind

Author: Zehra Phelan

Stx International has announced that new Batman possibility Jake Gyllenhaal, alongside Baby Driver’s Ansel Elgort and Spider-Man: Homecoming and The Greatest Showman’s Zendaya have joined the cast of the crime thriller, Finest Kind.

The feature is written and directed by the Legend and A Knights Tale filmmaker Brian Helgeland and will tell the story of two brothers – who will be played by Gyllenhaal and Elgort – who strike a dangerous deal with a crime syndicate that draws them into the Boston underworld. As pressures mount, sacrifices must be made and bonds are put to the test.

Gary Foster and Russ Krasnoff will be producing the feature through Krasnoff/Foster Entertainment. Imperative Entertainment’s Dan Friedkin and Bradley Thomas as well as Gyllenhaal and Riva Marker, under their Nine Stories banner, will also be producing.

“Brian and I have dreamed about making this film together for a long time.
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Watch Robert Pattinson, Tessa Thompson, Daveed Diggs, and More Discuss Their Sundance Projects at IndieWire’s Studio

At this year’s Sundance Film Festival, IndieWire debuted its inaugural IndieWire Studio at Sundance, presented by Dropbox, on Park City’s Main Street, which played home to interviews with some of indie film’s brightest stars. From the “Blindspotting” team reacting to the Opening Night response to their film just hours after it debuted to Robert Pattinson and Mia Wasikowska talking about the joys of working with a miniature horse to Nicolas Cage opening up about his totally wild turn in “Mandy” and “The Sentence” filmmaker Rudy Valdez tearing up while talking about his film’s subject (his very own sister), the studio featured intimate chats with the biggest names at the festival.

In addition to presenting sponsor Dropbox (which served the productions on more than 62 percent of the Sundance titles), sponsors included Adobe, which asked celebrity talent to share words of inspiration; Pizza Hut, which offered up essential
See full article at Indiewire »

“Film is About Making Magic with These Kind of Challenges”: Dp Diego García on Wildlife

For his directorial debut, Paul Dano adapted Richard Ford’s 1990 novel, telling the story of a marriage that falls apart between Jerry (Jake Gyllenhaal) and Jeanette Brinson (Carey Milligan), as seen through the eyes of their 14-year-old son Joe Brinson (Ed Oxenbould). Serving as Dano’s Dp, Diego García’s prominent recent credits include Apichatpong Weerasethakul’s Cemetery of Splendour and Gabriel Mascaro’s Neon Bull. Below, García discusses their mutual influences (including Kore-eda Hirokazu and The Master) and use of Panavision spherical primo lenses. Filmmaker: How and why did you wind up being the cinematographer of your film? What were the factors and attributes that led to your […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

Idris Elba, Emmy Rossum, and More Share Their Most Important Filmmaking Advice: ‘Be Honest in Whatever You Make’

Adobe celebrated #DiverseVoices this year at the 2018 Sundance Film Festival by asking actors and filmmakers to share words of inspiration to the next generation of talented artists. Actors such as Idris Elba, Emmy Rossum, and Paul Dano got in front of the Adobe camera at the IndieWire Studio presented by Dropbox to advise young artists to remain honest and think inclusively as their careers continue to grow.

Read More:Sundance 2018: A Slow Marketplace For Commercial Movies is Good News for a Festival Overwhelmed By Hype

“What’s really important because of the state of the world a this point is you be honest, be honest in whatever you make,” said Elba, who came to Sundance to premiere his directorial debut “Yardie.”

“You can make a YouTube film or a feature film, but whatever it is you make just be honest,” he said. “At this point in our world, we need honesty.
See full article at Indiewire »

Sundance 2018: From Survivors to Killers, Women Dominated a Festival Without Weinstein

Sundance 2018: From Survivors to Killers, Women Dominated a Festival Without Weinstein
As Hollywood explores the notion that female-driven movies aren’t just a good idea but also seriously bankable, the Sundance Film Festival in the post-Harvey Weinstein era unspooled its most female-facing slate in years. This year’s festival boasted a lineup packed with films that happily subverted the “strong female character” trope. Instead, we had a sprawling selection of complex, messy, rich, and real roles for actresses.

The festival’s most-talked about film, Jennifer Fox’s semi-autobiographical narrative debut, “The Tale,” offered that trope’s richest rebuke. The heartbreaking drama ostensibly follows Fox’s on-screen surrogate (Laura Dern) as she comes to terms with a decades-old molestation experience; it’s spawned by her mother’s (Ellen Burstyn) discovery of a “story” she wrote when she was 13, documenting her experiences with a pair of older coaches (Jason Ritter and Elizabeth Debicki). But Fox also uses the film as a clever way to explore memory,
See full article at Indiewire »

Review: Wildlife (Sundance)

  • JoBlo
Plot: The disintegration of a marriage, as seen through the eyes of a couple’s fourteen-year-old son. Review: Wildlife marks the directorial debut of actor Paul Dano, in a film he co-wrote with his partner, Zoe Kazan, and is based on the short novel by Richard Ford. Already, it’s raking-up acclaim, with many critics here claiming Dano’s film is nothing short of brilliant. While I... Read More...
See full article at JoBlo »

Paul Dano Brings Carey Mulligan To Sundance With His Directorial Debut ‘Wildlife’ – Sundance Studio

Paul Dano Brings Carey Mulligan To Sundance With His Directorial Debut ‘Wildlife’ – Sundance Studio
Paul Dano has been a Sundance fixture since his first trip to the festival when he was 16. He returns this year for the first time as a director, with his adaptation of Richard Ford’s Wildlife, co-written by Zoe Kazan. At Deadline’s Sundance Studio he expounded on his love of Ford’s work. When he picked up Wildlife, he told me, “Pretty much from the first sentence I knew I was going to love this book. I thought after reading it there might be a film here and maybe a film…
See full article at Deadline »

Scott Reviews Paul Dano’s Wildlife [Sundance 2018]

The prestige debut film is cornerstone of the modern art house market, and thus a persistent presence at Sundance. They are beautifully (almost too-cleanly) photographed, ostentatiously performed, over-explanatory, and narratively tidy. Paul Dano’s Wildlife has some of these pitfalls – in particular, it feels terribly insular to the point that anyone besides the four main performances feels under-directed – but is on the whole a mature, thoughtful film that I found awfully affecting.

Joe (Ed Oxenbould) has been on the move. His parents are habitually restless, rambling generally eastward in search of new jobs, new neighborhoods, new lives. At fourteen, he’s too old to keep going through it and too young to do anything about it. Lately, they’ve settled in Montana. They don’t know anyone. Jerry (Jake Gyllenhaal), is making the best of his job at a golf course, which means nothing when he is suddenly fired. His wife,
See full article at CriterionCast »

Wildlife review - Carey Mulligan plays flirtatious under big skies in Paul Dano's directorial debut

Mulligan is an unhappy wife and mother looking to break free in this adaptation of Richard Ford’s Montana-set novel

They call Montana “Big Sky Country” which I’ve always found to be the most beautiful nickname. It doesn’t quite make sense – how could the sky be bigger there than in London or Paris or Asbury Park, New Jersey? – but somehow an image still develops in the mind. Those snowy mountaintops and unobstructed horizons get plenty of screen time in Wildlife, a small gem of a film directed by Paul Dano, adapted by him and Zoe Kazan from a Richard Ford novel.

It is a quiet, subtle story and, as is so often the case when an actor takes their first trip behind the camera, a showcase for terrific performances. Front and center here is Carey Mulligan as a young wife and mother in 1960 edging toward independence. Jeanette (Mulligan
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

‘Wildlife’ Review: Carey Mulligan Astounds in Paul Dano’s Directorial Debut | Sundance 2018

Wildlife is a film about faces. The face of a young boy, confused and inquisitive, attempting to untangle the mystery behind his parents’ quiet conversations. The face of a mother, resilient yet fragile, attempting to put on a façade of optimism when surrounded by impending destruction. The face of a father, embarrassed and defeated, trying to maintain a shred of dignity as he loses his job. That Paul Dano chose the Richard Ford novel Wildlife as his directorial debut was a feat of ambition, but in practice—working from a meticulous and introspective script he co-wrote with Zoe …
See full article at Collider.com »

Keira Knightley Says Streaming Services Are Helping Create More Compelling Roles for Women in Film — Sundance 2018

Keira Knightley Says Streaming Services Are Helping Create More Compelling Roles for Women in Film — Sundance 2018
There’s no big secret as to why Keira Knightley keeps gravitating towards historical and period-set movies: they just happen to offer her the kind of roles she’s eager to sink her teeth into. Recently, the actress told Variety, “I don’t really do films set in the modern day because the female characters nearly always get raped. I always find something distasteful in the way women are portrayed.” For her, the “very inspiring” characters keep showing up in movies set decades, even centuries ago.

Such is the case with Wash Westmoreland’s “Colette,” which just debuted at the Sundance Film Festival, starring Knightley in the eponymous role of the trailblazing French author. But while “Colette” itself includes plenty of “modern” touches and ideas, Knightley is also enthused by what she sees as an uptick in better, beefier roles for women in modern-set movies.

Read More:Keira Knightley Stays Away
See full article at Indiewire »

Carey Mulligan Talks About Being Directed by Longtime Friend and First-Time Filmmaker Paul Dano — Sundance

Carey Mulligan Talks About Being Directed by Longtime Friend and First-Time Filmmaker Paul Dano — Sundance
Friendly collaboration is a part of independent film, but it’s always a challenge to work with your actual friends. At the IndieWire Sundance Studio presented by Dropbox, “Wildlife” star Carey Mulligan shared her experiences working with longtime friends Paul Dano and Zoe Kazan.

“There was a kind of triple threat of fear involved in working with people I’ve known as friends for a decade,” Mulligan said. “It was really amazing to be able to work with someone who understands acting so well and understands the holes that you get into when you can’t understand something or the problems that you have in the room, in the moment with that one line.”

Read More:‘Wildlife’ Review: Carey Mulligan Is on Fire in Paul Dano’s Stunningly Beautiful Directorial Debut — Sundance 2018

Mulligan stars in the film as Jeanette, a mother trying to keep her family intact after her husband
See full article at Indiewire »

Carey Mulligan Shines In Emotionally Distant ‘Wildlife’ [Sundance Review]

Sometimes actors can really direct. Case in point, Paul Dano. Having worked with masters of the form in his short but impressive career, Dano seems to have learned a lot from the likes of Steve McQueen, Denis Villeneuve, Paul Thomas Anderson and Rian Johnson. One would easily think that the 35-year-old actor, now turned filmmaker, looked closely and attentively at these filmmakers at work to prepare for his eventual debut, “Wildlife.” The result is a precise, controlled, but perhaps emotionally distant adaptation of Richard Ford’s short novel.

Continue reading Carey Mulligan Shines In Emotionally Distant ‘Wildlife’ [Sundance Review] at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

‘Wildlife’ Review: Carey Mulligan Is on Fire in Paul Dano’s Stunningly Beautiful Directorial Debut — Sundance 2018

‘Wildlife’ Review: Carey Mulligan Is on Fire in Paul Dano’s Stunningly Beautiful Directorial Debut — Sundance 2018
Families are built upon two things: blood and belief. They can get by on the strength of one or the other (to have both is something of a luxury), but when the latter starts to wither, the former can only do so much to save it. This strange alchemy — the science responsible for so many American lives — percolates inside every frame of Paul Dano’s remarkable “Wildlife,” a tender, gorgeous, and exquisitely understated drama about a family that loses its faith in itself.

Adapted from Richard Ford’s 1990 novel of the same name, “Wildlife” begins in a calm and idyllic Montana town circa early 1960s. More specifically, it begins on the front lawn of a small house where a father and son are throwing a football just before dinner, disrupting the Edward Hopper tableaux like a fleck of stray paint. The two of them disappear around the side of the property,
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Wildlife’ Review: Paul Dano’s Directorial Debut Is an Austere Portrait of a Family in Crisis

  • The Wrap
‘Wildlife’ Review: Paul Dano’s Directorial Debut Is an Austere Portrait of a Family in Crisis
Actors Paul Dano and Idris Elba both premiered their feature directing debuts on Saturday at the Sundance Film Festival, but it would be hard to imagine two films more dissimilar than Dano’s “Wildlife” and Elba’s “Yardie.” The latter, which TheWrap will cover separately, is a rough and violent story set in East London in the 1970s. But Dano’s film, which he adapted with his partner, Zoe Kazan, from the Richard Ford novel, is quiet and contemplative; there’s emotional tumult, to be sure, but “Wildlife” is stylishly understated and slow-paced to a degree that may alienate some viewers, who’ll find the...
See full article at The Wrap »

'Wildlife': Film Review | Sundance 2018

'Wildlife': Film Review | Sundance 2018
Actor Paul Dano has made a small gem in Wildlife, his first film as a director. Precise, controlled and emotionally acute, this adaptation of Richard Ford’s short fourth novel, published in 1990, examines the disintegration of a marriage from the point of view of the couple’s 14-year-old son (he was two years older in the book) and does so with gentle precision and narrative economy. Unusually restrained and unemphatic by contemporary standards, the film possesses an integrity and economy of means that earns respect, even if it will probably feel old-fashioned to contemporary adolescents in the same age bracket as...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »
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