Paddy Chayefsky - News Poster

News

Network review – Bryan Cranston creates studio mayhem

Lyttelton, London

Cranston is compelling as the TV anchorman-gone-rogue in Ivo Van Hove and Lee Hall’s dazzling stage version of the 1976 film

Flesh and gizmo. Substance and reflections. Watchers and watched. A massive whirling mix of the mechanical and the human. Ivo van Hove’s electric staging of Network restores at a stroke my faltering esteem for this director. Lee Hall’s adaptation of Paddy Chayefsky’s 1976 film makes this look like a prescient, urgent text. It lands with messianic zeal: on press night the audience at the National, not instinctive risers, were up on their feet as if at a revivalist meeting.

A jutting-jawed anchorman, galvanically embodied by Breaking Bad’s Bryan Cranston, gets fired from a commercial news channel because of poor ratings – and cracks up. Or cracks open, to reveal a palpitating, anti-news-as-entertainment spirit. “I’m mad as hell and I’m not going to take it any more!
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Bryan Cranston Says There May Be A Way Back For Spacey And Weinstein

Former Breaking Bad actor Bryan Cranston believes there may be a way back for Kevin Spacey and shamed Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein, whose allegations of sexual misconduct and harassment have triggered a series of stories and revelations designed to expose the industry’s long history of abuse.

Make no mistake, Cranston still roundly condemned Weinstein and Spacey for their predatory and wildly inappropriate behavior, and stressed that the latter’s career is ostensibly dead and buried: “He’s a phenomenal actor but he’s not a very good person.”

As for what the future holds, Cranston showed a hint of optimism, and told BBC News that, “it would take time, it would take a society to forgive them, and it would take tremendous contrition on their part,” beginning with the omission that they each “have a deeply rooted psychological and emotional problem.”

If they were to show us that they
See full article at We Got This Covered »

Bryan Cranston interview: Philip K. Dick’s Electric Dreams

Rob Leane Oct 23, 2017

Bryan Cranston chats to us about his involvement in Channel 4 and Amazon’s Phillip K. Dick anthology series, Electric Dreams...

Amazon and Channel 4’s Philip K. Dick anthology series, Electric Dreams, adapts ten of the iconic author’s short stories into hour-long TV dramas.

The show has the mighty Bryan Cranston involved as an actor and an executive producer. This marks the second Amazon production that Cranston has pulled double duty on, following on from Sneaky Pete.

Along with a bunch of other journalists, Den Of Geek took part in a roundtable interview with Cranston on the set of Electric Dreams, on an offensively hot day back in June. Here’s how it went...

I think what we all want to know is the genesis of how Electric Dreams came together.

It did come together. I bumped into Michael Dinner, who was a director that I knew,
See full article at Den of Geek »

Love with the Proper Stranger

What are two individualistic, highly motivated movie stars supposed to do when faced with an unimaginative studio system eager to misuse their talents? Natalie Wood and Steve McQueen collaborate with a great writer, director and producer for an urban romance with an eye on the sexual double standard. It’s a hybrid production: a gritty drama that’s also a calculated career move.

Love with the Proper Stranger

Blu-ray

Kl Studio Classics

1963 / B&W / 1:85 widescreen / 100 min. / Street Date September 19, 2017 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95

Starring: Natalie Wood, Steve McQueen, Edie Adams, Tom Bosley, Herschel Bernardi, Harvey Lembeck, Agusta Ciolli, Nina Varela, Marilyn Chris, Richard Dysart, Arlene Golonka, Tony Mordente, Nobu McCarthy, Richard Mulligan, Vic Tayback, Dyanne Thorne, Val Avery.

Cinematography: Milton Krasner

Film Editor: Aaron Stell

Original Music: Elmer Bernstein

Written by Arnold Schulman

Produced by Alan J. Pakula

Directed by Robert Mulligan

1963’s Love with the Proper Stranger is
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

The Dceu Must Die -- The Lrm Weekend

By David Kozlowski | 25 August 2017

Welcome to Issue #10 of The Lrm Weekend, a weekly column offering opinions about film, TV, comics, Star Wars, Marvel, DC, animation, and anime. We also want to hear from you! Share your feedback and ideas for future columns: @LRM_Weekend

Previous Issues: 8.18.17 | 8.11.17 | 8.4.17 | 7.28.17 | 7.21.17 | 7.14.17

Hey Lrm Weekenders, we've hit double-digits! This week we're taking a dive into the odd career of martial artist-action star Steven Seagal, exploring the creations of Hellboy's Mike Mignola, and reaching back to the amazing, epic sci-fi films of the 80s. But first, in our editorial we explain why WB needs to stick a knife between the ribs of the Dceu and dump it into the nearest body of water.

Warner Bros. Must Come To Their Senses And Kill The Dceu -- Focus On Stand-Alone Solo and Elseworlds Films!

Hollywood has fallen deeply, tragically in love with trilogies, franchises, and connected universes, often to the detriment of simple,
See full article at LRM Online »

Michelle Dockery Cast Opposite Bryan Cranston in 'Network'

Michelle Dockery Cast Opposite Bryan Cranston in 'Network'
Playwright Lee Hall and director Ivo van Hove have cast Michelle Dockery as the female lead in their highly anticipated London stage adaptation of the Sidney Lumet film, Network.

The Downton Abbey star will play Diana Christensen, the ambitious U.S. television executive who blurs the lines separating entertainment, news and naked human suffering in her unethical quest for ratings glory. The role won an Oscar for Faye Dunaway in the 1976 film, which was written by Paddy Chayefsky.

Dockery joins previously announced lead Bryan Cranston, who will make his British stage debut as Howard Beale, the psychologically unstable news anchor...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Martin Landau, Oscar Winner for ‘Ed Wood,’ Dies at 89

Martin Landau, Oscar Winner for ‘Ed Wood,’ Dies at 89
Oscar-winning actor Martin Landau, most closely associated with scene-stealing character turns in such films as “North by Northwest,” “Crimes and Misdemeanors” and “Ed Wood” as well as the classic TV series “Mission: Impossible,” died Saturday in Los Angeles, according to his publicist. He had been hospitalized at UCLA where he experienced complications. He was 89.

The lanky, offbeat-looking veteran of the Actors Studio, for he which he was currently West Coast co-artistic director, had many ups and downs in his career. His greatest successes (three Oscar nominations and one win) came later in life when he returned to character roles like the one that first won him notice, as James Mason’s sinister gay henchman in Alfred Hitchcock’s “North by Northwest.”

He was Emmy-nominated five times, and most of his leading man roles came on television, most notably as Rollin Hand, a master of disguise on “Mission: Impossible.” He later spent a couple of years starring in
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Martin Landau, Oscar Winner for ‘Ed Wood’ Dies, at 89

Martin Landau, Oscar Winner for ‘Ed Wood’ Dies, at 89
Oscar-winning actor Martin Landau, most closely associated with scene-stealing character turns in such films as “North by Northwest,” “Crimes and Misdemeanors” and “Ed Wood” as well as the classic TV series “Mission: Impossible,” died Saturday in Los Angeles, according to his publicist. He had been hospitalized at UCLA where he experienced complications. He was 89.

The lanky, offbeat-looking veteran of the Actors Studio, for he which he was currently West Coast co-artistic director, had many ups and downs in his career. His greatest successes (three Oscar nominations and one win) came later in life when he returned to character roles like the one that first won him notice, as James Mason’s sinister gay henchman in Alfred Hitchcock’s “North by Northwest.”

He was Emmy-nominated five times, and most of his leading man roles came on television, most notably as Rollin Hand, a master of disguise on “Mission: Impossible.” He later spent a couple of years starring in
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Wild, Dangerous, Imperfect, Wounded Grandeur: 18 Double Features About America

The United States is “my country, right or wrong,” of course, and I consider myself a patriotic person, but I’ve never felt that patriotism meant blind fealty to the idea of America’s rightful dominance over global politics or culture, and certainly not to its alleged preferred status on God’s short list of favored nations, or that allegiance to said country was a license to justify or rationalize every instance of misguided, foolish, narrow-minded domestic or foreign policy.

In 2012, when this piece was first posted, it seemed like a good moment to throw the country’s history and contradictions into some sort of quick relief, and the most expedient way of doing that for me was to look at the way the United States (and the philosophies at its core) were reflected in the movies, and not just the ones which approached the country head-on as a subject.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

American Horror Story: Season Seven; Cheyenne Jackson Returning

The new season of American Horror Story will see the return of a familiar face. According to JustJared, Cheyenne Jackson will star in season seven of the FX TV series.Jackson has appeared in the past two seasons of the horror anthology drama, playing Will Drake in American Horror Story: Hotel and Sidney Aaron James in the show's sixth season, American Horror Story: Roanoke.Read More…
See full article at TVSeriesFinale »

‘American Horror Story’: Sarah Paulson Wants to Reprise Her ‘Coven’ Character

‘American Horror Story’: Sarah Paulson Wants to Reprise Her ‘Coven’ Character
PaleyFest La wrapped its week of TV panels with FX’s “American Horror Story: Roanoke.”

Executive producer Brad Falchuk revisited his original interest in the concept of “Roanoke” during a Q&A on Sunday at Hollywood’s Dolby Theatre.

“Even before the show, we were always fascinated by it. It’s one of the few American mysteries so it was always in the back of our head. It was nice to have something that had just a kernel of truth in it and we could fill in whatever we want,” said Falchuk.

“Every season we’ve always tried to do something different. We really wanted to be as scary as possible. I wanted to beat the hell out of the cast in a different way,” he added.

Sarah Paulson, who played three characters during “Roanoke,” including reprising “Asylum’s” Lana Winters, compared this season to her previous ones on show.

“Usually
See full article at Variety - TV News »

SXSW Film Review: ‘This Is Your Death’

SXSW Film Review: ‘This Is Your Death’
Would you watch a reality show in which contestants killed themselves live on air? The screenwriters of “This Is Your Death” think you would, and they’re deeply disappointed in you. And so, out of deep concern for both your entertainment and enlightenment, they have written a dark social satire — serviceably directed by “Breaking Bad” baddie Giancarlo Esposito — in which they can have their cake, while you eat it, too. That means theatrical audiences (of whom there will be few) will have the chance to tsk-tsk as “real people” drown, shoot, electrocute, and otherwise off themselves, only to have the movie turn around and tsk-tsk them back for watching.

Those old enough to have lived through the first Golden Age of Television will recognize the pun in the film’s title — a riff on 1950s spirit-lifter “This Is Your Life” — while also remembering a time when even standard small-screen programming
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Robert Osborne, TCM Host and Film Historian, Dies at 84

Robert Osborne, TCM Host and Film Historian, Dies at 84
Film historian Robert Osborne, the effervescent primetime host of Turner Classic Movies since the cabler’s inception in 1994, has died. He was 84.

TCM’s general manager Jennifer Dorian released a statement saying, “All of us at Turner Classic Movies are deeply saddened by the death of Robert Osborne. Robert was a beloved member of the Turner family for more than 23 years. He joined us as an expert on classic film and grew to be our cherished colleague and esteemed ambassador for TCM. Robert was embraced by devoted fans who saw him as a trusted expert and friend. His calming presence, gentlemanly style, encyclopedic knowledge of film history, fervent support for film preservation and highly personal interviewing style all combined to make him a truly world-class host. Robert’s contributions were fundamental in shaping TCM into what it is today and we owe him a debt of gratitude that can never be repaid. Our
See full article at Variety - TV News »

USC School of Cinematic Arts Launches John Wells Division With Endowment

USC School of Cinematic Arts Launches John Wells Division With Endowment
John Wells, best known for executive producing “The West Wing,” “ER” and “Shameless,” has endowed USC’s School of Cinematic Arts with a significant gift to name its Division of Writing for Screen & Television.

The division will be called the John Wells Division of Writing for Screen & Television. The gift was announced by the school’s dean, Elizabeth Daley. Wells is a 1982 graduate of the school’s Peter Stark Producing Program.

The dedication of the school took place Thursday and featured a conversation between Wells and “The West Wing” star Bradley Whitford. The division’s curriculum covers feature-length screenplays and television episodes in comedy and drama, web series and scripts for games and immersive media.

Wells is currently executive producer on the TNT drama series “Animal Kingdom” and on Showtime’s “Shameless.” He was executive producer on “Southland,” “Mildred Pierce” and “China Beach.” He’s also directed “Love and Mercy,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

USC School of Cinematic Arts Launches John Wells Division With Endowment

USC School of Cinematic Arts Launches John Wells Division With Endowment
John Wells, best known for executive producing “The West Wing,” “ER” and “Shameless,” has endowed USC’s School of Cinematic Arts with a significant gift to name its Division of Writing for Screen & Television.

The division will be called the John Wells Division of Writing for Screen & Television. The gift was announced by the school’s dean, Elizabeth Daley. Wells is a 1982 graduate of the school’s Peter Stark Producing Program.

The dedication of the school took place Thursday and featured a conversation between Wells and “The West Wing” star Bradley Whitford. The division’s curriculum covers feature-length screenplays and television episodes in comedy and drama, web series and scripts for games and immersive media.

Wells is currently executive producer on the TNT drama series “Animal Kingdom” and on Showtime’s “Shameless.” He was executive producer on “Southland,” “Mildred Pierce” and “China Beach.” He’s also directed “Love and Mercy,” “August: Osage County
See full article at Variety - TV News »

‘Separate Tables’ Screenwriter John Gay Dies at 92

‘Separate Tables’ Screenwriter John Gay Dies at 92
John Gay, known for writing movies including “Run Silent Run Deep,” “Separate Tables,” “The Hallelujah Trail” and “The Courtship of Eddie’s Father,” died on Feb. 4 in Santa Monica. He was 92.

Gay shared an Oscar writing nom with Terrence Rattigan for the screenplay for “Separate Tables,” a 1958 romantic drama starring Burt Lancaster, Rita Hayworth, Deborah Kerr, and David Niven.

Long active in the Writers Guild of America, Gay wrote 14 feature films and 39 miniseries and TV movies, scripting projects for John Huston, Vincent Minnelli and John Sturges. He helped lead the Writers Guild through difficult negotiations while serving on the Wgaw’s Board of Directors (1971-75, 1977-79), and as Vice President (1985-87).

Gay started out in live television starring with his wife Barbara in “Mr. and Mrs. Mystery,” and went on to write for numerous live TV dramas. Lancaster helped recruit him to Hollywood, where he wrote Clark Gable-Lancaster starring submarine film “Run Silent Run Deep.” He
See full article at Variety - TV News »

‘Separate Tables’ Screenwriter John Gay Dies at 92

‘Separate Tables’ Screenwriter John Gay Dies at 92
John Gay, known for writing movies including “Run Silent Run Deep,” “Separate Tables,” “The Hallelujah Trail” and “The Courtship of Eddie’s Father,” died on Feb. 4 in Santa Monica. He was 92.

Gay shared an Oscar writing nom with Terrence Rattigan for the screenplay for “Separate Tables,” a 1958 romantic drama starring Burt Lancaster, Rita Hayworth, Deborah Kerr, and David Niven.

Long active in the Writers Guild of America, Gay wrote 14 feature films and 39 miniseries and TV movies, scripting projects for John Huston, Vincent Minnelli and John Sturges. He helped lead the Writers Guild through difficult negotiations while serving on the Wgaw’s Board of Directors (1971-75, 1977-79), and as Vice President (1985-87).

Gay started out in live television starring with his wife Barbara in “Mr. and Mrs. Mystery,” and went on to write for numerous live TV dramas. Lancaster helped recruit him to Hollywood, where he wrote Clark Gable-Lancaster
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Read Aaron Sorkin’s Anti-Trump Tirade at WGA Awards

  • The Wrap
Read Aaron Sorkin’s Anti-Trump Tirade at WGA Awards
Aaron Sorkin lit into President Donald Trump in a “Network”-inspired speech at the Writers Guild of America Awards on Sunday. Here are his remarks about Trump transcribed. (We added the word “don’t” in brackets in two places where Sorkin dropped it.) From time to time I write stories about politics so it was suggested to me that I might have something to say about the situation in which we currently find ourselves. It’ll come as no surprise that I do. So, in the spirit of Paddy Chayefsky, here goes. We’ve been told that as coastal elites
See full article at The Wrap »

In Anti-Trump Speech, Aaron Sorkin Is Mad as Hell and Not Gonna Take It Anymore (Video)

  • The Wrap
In Anti-Trump Speech, Aaron Sorkin Is Mad as Hell and Not Gonna Take It Anymore (Video)
As “West Wing” creator Aaron Sorkin accepted an award named for Paddy Chayefsky on Sunday, he sounded like one of the “Network” screenwriter’s characters: He was mad as hell at President Donald Trump and not gonna take it any more. He urged a room filled with Writers Guild of America writers — “old and young, black and white, gay and straight, wealthy and struggling, and yes, liberal and conservative,” he said — to write stories that will change the state of the country. “The most powerful delivery system ever invented for an idea is a story,” he said. Also Read: Read Aaron Sorkin's Anti-Trump.
See full article at The Wrap »

Trump, Triumph and Speaking Truth to Power: Politics Take a Bow at 2017 Writers Guild Awards

Trump, Triumph and Speaking Truth to Power: Politics Take a Bow at 2017 Writers Guild Awards
When you think about the Writers Guild of America, which hosted two award ceremonies on Sunday night in two Blue cities, New York and Los Angeles, it’s no surprise that the writers spoke out. (Check out videos of some of the best bits below.)

For example, while accepting his life achievement award, filmmaker Oliver Stone got two standing ovations. After conservative James Woods was targeted at the top of the evening by WGA West Awards show host Patton Oswalt, retaliating by going onstage to steal his shoe, Woods presented the WGA award to the ultra liberal Stone, who starred him in “Salvador,” won three Oscars for “Midnight Express,” “Born on the Fourth of July” and “Platoon,” and penned “greed is good.”

Stone thanked mentors Robert Bolt and Ernest Lehman as well as Wma agent Ron Mardigian. He reminded that when he told Billy Wilder about his “Nixon” running time of 3 hours 10 minutes,
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »
loading
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Credited With | External Sites