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Michelle Yeoh to Be Feted at Macau Festival

Michelle Yeoh to Be Feted at Macau Festival
Malaysian star Michelle Yeoh is to be the subject of the In Focus section at next month’s International Film Festival & Awards Macao. The festival (Dec. 8-14) has also completed its lineup.

Yeoh, whose credits stretch from “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon” to “Tomorrow Never Dies” and “Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2,” will appear in an in-conversation session Dec. 14. The festival will also screen her 2010 effort “Reign of Assassins,” directed by Su Chao-pin.

The festival added five films across its different sections and unveiled details of the Crossfire section, in which directors pick genre films that influenced them.

The festival added Craig Gillespie’s “I, Tonya,” Korean blockbuster “The Outlaws,” French smash hit “C’est La Vie!” (aka “Le Sens De La Fete”) from Olivier Nakache and Eric Toledano; and Macau film maker Lorence Chan’s “Passing Rain.” Iffam jury president Laurent Cantet will introduce a special presentation of his latest film, “The Workshop
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Official Oscar® Entry Best Foreign Language Film from France: ‘Bpm (Beats Per Minute)

  • Sydney's Buzz
Official Oscar® Entry Best Foreign Language Film from France: ‘Bpm (Beats Per Minute)
In this year’s foreign-language race, a number of Lgbt-oriented titles are vying for attention. France’s Bpm (Beats Per Minute), directed by Robin Campillo, could be the favorite: a rich, sensual, impassioned study of early AIDS activism and gay awakening in Paris, it took the Grand Prix at Cannes and has been winning hearts on the festival circuit and kudos from critics.

After Cannes, Bpm (Beats Per Minute) played Toronto International Film Festival and New York Film Festival among others, winning many awards along the way.

“Impassioned and deeply absorbing. Notable for both its hot-blooded sensuality and its intricate, bittersweet play with memory.”

- Justin Chang, Los Angeles Times

“Broadly enlightening and piercingly intimate. A vital contribution to queer and political cinema. Campillo has given his movie the breath of true life. It grieves and triumphs and haunts with abounding grace and understanding, its heartbeat thumping with genuine, undeniable resonance.
See full article at Sydney's Buzz »

Macau Film Festival: 'Paddington 2' Set as Opener, Laurent Cantet to Head Jury

Macau Film Festival: 'Paddington 2' Set as Opener, Laurent Cantet to Head Jury
The regional premiere of Paul King’s Paddington 2 will open the second edition of the International Film Festival & Awards Macao (Iffam), while French filmmaker Laurent Cantet will lead the event's main competition jury.

Running Dec. 8-14 in the former Portuguese colony, the Macau festival's main competition section will feature a lineup made up exclusively of films by first and second-time directors. The contenders include Tiff titles Borg McEnroe from Januz Metz and Michael Pearce's Beast, Wrath Of Silence by Xin Yukun, and Samuel Maoz's Foxtrot.

Hong Kong action hero and Rogue One co-star Donnie Yen, and Korean star D.O....
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Pablo Trapero, Martina Gusmán, Bérénice Bejo, Wild Bunch Team for ‘La Quietud’ (Exclusive)

Pablo Trapero, Martina Gusmán, Bérénice Bejo, Wild Bunch Team for ‘La Quietud’ (Exclusive)
One of Latin America’s highest-profile filmmakers, Pablo Trapero, will direct Martina Gusmán (“Lion’s Den”) and Bérénice Bejo (“The Artist”) in “La Quietud,” an intimate family drama turning on two sisters’ reencounter and attempt at closure on a common troubled past.

Wild Bunch will handle international sales and looks set to introduce the new title to buyers at next week’s American Film Market.

Edgar Ramírez (“Carlos”) plays the older sister’s husband; Graciela Borges (“Chronicle of a Lady,” “The Swamp”), one of Argentina’s grand dames, is the sisters’ mother; Joaquín Furriel (“The Bronze Garden”) has also joined the cast.

Going into production in the week of Nov. 20, and shooting on a country estate in the province of Buenos Aires, “La Quietud” is set up at Trapero and Gusmán’s Buenos Aires production house Matanza Cine. Headed by Melita Toscan du Plantier and Marie-Jeanne Pascal, Paris-based Macassar Productions co-produces out of France. Viacom-owned free-to-air
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Morelia: Toons Bookend 15th Annual Morelia International Film Festival

Morelia: Toons Bookend 15th Annual Morelia International Film Festival
Animation pics are bookending the Morelia International Film Festival for the first time in its 15-year history. Pixar Animation Studios’ latest opus, “Coco,” no less, receives its world premiere in Morelia on opening night, October 20, while Carlos Carrera’s “Ana & Bruno” marks its Latin American premiere when it wraps the fest on October 28.

Set in Mexico and against the country’s most important annual event, the Day of the Dead, “Coco” is an apt choice as Morelia and the nearby lakeside village of Patzcuaro are particularly renowned for their Day of the Dead festivities. Since the festival usually ends close to the eve of the holiday, some guests have stayed on to witness the pageantry.

Snagging the world premiere of Pixar’s latest animated feature began some two years ago when festival director Daniela Michel met Pixar Chief Creative officer John Lasseter at the Lumière Festival in Lyon where Lasseter told her that Pixar’s next project
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Venice Film Review: ‘Mektoub My Love: Canto Uno’

Venice Film Review: ‘Mektoub My Love: Canto Uno’
Late in “Mektoub My Love: Canto Uno,” two characters make plans for a quiet, home-cooked pasta dinner. Just tomatoes, basil and garlic for the sauce, slow-cooked until rich and integrated in flavor: It’s critical, they agree, that it takes its time to simmer. Abdellatif Kechiche’s filmmaking often follows a similar recipe of everyday components turned flavorfully complex with the patient investment of time: It’s how his Palme d’Or-winning “Blue is the Warmest Color” turned an ostensibly simple story of first love and heartbreak into a human odyssey of intricate interior detail. Another gorgeous three-hour study of young, attractively housed hearts in often turbulent motion, “Mektoub” is a frequently seductive sensory epic of equivalent ambition, yet despite its woozily pleasurable set pieces, the fraught emotions binding them are less urgent, and the perspective of its protagonist far less immediate.

Somehow Kechiche — loosely adapting the novel “La blessure, la
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Return to Ithaca review – Palme d'Or winner's Cuban comrades clean out their closets

Laurent Cantet, director of The Class, zeroes in on a Havana roof terrace for this wistful chamber piece in which old friends meet up to drink, reminisce and exhume old secrets

Laurent Cantet set the seal on his pre-eminence by winning the Cannes Palme d’Or in 2008 with the tough school drama Entre les Murs, or The Class; and then his English-language debut Foxfire (2012), adapted from Joyce Carol Oates, was respectfully received. But this is a very low-key chamber piece from 2014, about a reunion of middle-aged friends, which of course turns out to be an autumnal, bittersweet affair involving the exhumation of painful secrets. It is set mostly in one spot: a roof-terrace overlooking Havana’s Malecón, and has evidently grown out of Cantet’s contribution to the portmanteau movie 7 Days in Havana (2012).

Five old Cuban comrades meet up for drinks: troubled Tanía (Isabel Santos), boisterous neocapitalist Eddy (Jorge Perugorría
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Back to school for a class act by Richard Mowe

Actress Sara Forestier and director Hélène Angel on the set of Elementary Photo: Unifrance The French, without wishing to sound chauvinistic, hold their education system in high regard. Cinema has reflected that interest in films from Jean Vigo’s Zero de Conduite in 1933, through the gentle documentary about life in a country infant school Etre et Avoir (2002) by Nicolas Phlibert to Laurent Cantet’s Cannes Palme d’Or winner The Class (2008), set in a raw inner city school. And let’s not forget Abdellatif Kechiche’s L’Esquive (2003), Louis Malle’s 1987 Au Revoir Les Enfants, Julie Bertuccelli’s School of Babel (2013), and Christophe Barratier’s 2004 The Chorus.

Joining the throng is director Hélène Angel with Elementary (Primaire) in which Sara Forestier plays a primary school teacher who has no time for a personal life and lives in an apartment in the grounds with her ten-year-old son.

Angel says: “Education is
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

San Sebastian: ’Underground,’ ‘The Sower’ ‘Killing Jesus,’ ‘Princesita’ Make New Directors Cut

San Sebastian: ’Underground,’ ‘The Sower’ ‘Killing Jesus,’ ‘Princesita’ Make New Directors Cut
Madrid — Daniel Palacio’s “Underground,” Marine Francen’s “The Sower,” Laura Mora’s “Killing Jesus” and Marialy Rivas’ “Princesita” are among 13 first titles announced by Spain’s San Sebastian Festival for its New Directors section, the biggest sidebar at the Spanish-speaking world’s highest-profile film event.

Sponsored by the Basque Country’s Kutxabank, New Directors carries a €50,000 ($57,600) cash prize for the director and Spanish distributor of the winning film. It also serves to highlight some outstanding debuts or second films of the year: Pedro Almodovar, Olivier Assayas, Danny Boyle, Walter Salles, Nicolas Winding Refn and Laurent Cantet have seen early titles in its line-up.

Inevitably, the films also say something also about the zeitgeist, captured often by disaffected directors seeking to make their mark with bold visions of youth and its discontents.

Produced by Cannes Competition regular Brillante Mendoza, for instance, Daniel Palacio’s Philippines-set “Underground” weighs in as a grounded cemetery-set young family drama come grave
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Karlovy Vary Film Review: ‘Corporate’

Karlovy Vary Film Review: ‘Corporate’
“Fire” can be an oddly inappropriate verb for the act of ending a person’s employment: It implies a decision committed in heated fury, whereas frosty impersonality is so often closer to the mark. So it largely proves in “Corporate,” a smart, slow-simmering French workplace thriller that wades in deep, chilly waters of moral corruption and compromise. That blandly prosaic title — one can’t help suspecting freshman writer-director Nicolas Silhol would rather have titled it “Inhuman Resources” — and a clinical, slightly televisual aesthetic shouldn’t deter international distributors from a mostly engrossing what-would-you-do drama, headed by the ever-interesting Céline Sallette as a human resources manager whose professional sangfroid cracks in the wake of an employee’s suicide. Released in France in April, “Corporate” had its international premiere in Karlovy Vary; multi-platform release prospects are strong.

French cinema has a tradition of dramas in which the politics and vagaries of respectable employment are scrutinized with rare intensity. “Corporate
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Rare Cannes Swedish Favorite, AIDS Drama and Best Actor Winner Phoenix Oscar Chances?

Palme d'Or winner 'The Square' with Claes Bang: 'Gobsmackingly weird' Cannes Film Festival favorite may have a tough time landing a Best Foreign Language Film Academy Award nomination. Ruben Östlund's comedy-drama is totally unrelated to Jehane Noujaim's 2013 Oscar-nominated political documentary of the same title, which refers to downtown Cairo's Tahrir Square. Cannes' Palme d'Or winner 'The Square' & other Official Competition favorites' Oscar chances Screenwriter-director Ruben Östlund's The Square was the Palme d'Or winner at the 2017 Cannes Film Festival, which wrapped up on May 28. (See list of Palme d'Or and other 2017 Cannes winners further below.) Clocking in at about 2 hours and 20 minutes, Östlund's unusual comedy-drama revolving around the chaotic p.r. campaign to promote the opening of the titular installation – a symbolic square of light – at a contemporary art museum in Stockholm has been generally well-received by critics. In the opinion of The Guardian's Peter Bradshaw,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Curzon adds Cannes quartet including 'I Am Not A Witch'

  • ScreenDaily
Curzon adds Cannes quartet including 'I Am Not A Witch'
Exclusive: Claire Denis comedy and Léonor Serraille’s Camera d’Or winner also among haul.

UK art-house kingpin Curzon Artificial Eye has locked up a further four Cannes titles bringing its current haul from the festival to a mighty 10 movies.

New to the slate are Claire Denis’ Let The Sunshine In (Un Beau Soleil Interieur), joint winner of the Sacd award in Directors’ Fortnight, Laurent Cantet’s well-received The Workshop (L’Atelier), Léonor Serraille’s Camera d’Or winner Young Woman (Jeune Femme) and Rungano Nyoni’s striking Directors’ Fortnight entry I Am Not A Witch.

As previously announced the distributor has acquired Palme d’Or winner The Square, Grand Prix winner 120 Beats Per Minute, best screenplay winner The Killing Of A Sacred Deer, Fatih Akin’s Competition drama In The Fade (Aus Dem Nichts), for which Diane Kruger won the best actress prize, Michael Haneke’s Happy End and Francois Ozon’s L’Amant Double.

Directors
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Cannes Awards: Controversial Swedish Satire ‘The Square’ Wins Palme d’Or

Cannes Awards: Controversial Swedish Satire ‘The Square’ Wins Palme d’Or
Cannes — The 70th anniversary Cannes Film Festival has wrapped, culminating with an unconventional awards ceremony in which Pedro Almodóvar and his jury bestowed a couple unexpected bonus prizes, including a tie for screenplay and a special award to Nicole Kidman, who appeared in four projects in this year’s official selection, including competition titles “The Killing of a Sacred Deer” and “The Beguiled,” season two of “Top of the Lake” and special screening “How to Talk to Girls at Parties.”

Meanwhile, the fabled Palme d’Or went to Swedish director Ruben Östlund’s cutting art-world (and real-world) satire “The Square,” which dares to bring aspects of conceptual and performance art into the sphere of cinema. The choice came as something of a surprise, if only because the masterful, 142-minute film has divided audiences so far, and jury prizes rely on consensus.

Östlund’s follow-up to Un Certain Regard winner “Force Majeure,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Cannes: Predicting This Year’s Palme d’Or Winner and Other Awards

Cannes: Predicting This Year’s Palme d’Or Winner and Other Awards
It’s crunch time. All 19 competition films in this year’s Cannes Film Festival have been seen and scrutinized, and now jury president Pedro Almodovar — along with Jessica Chastain, Maren Ade, Will Smith, Agnes Jaoui, Park Chan-wook, Paolo Sorrentino, Fan Bingbing and Gabriel Yared — have the next day to argue amongst themselves over which title is most deserving of the Palme d’Or, among other prizes.

Every year, predicting the jury’s favorites is something of a fool’s errand, fraught with inconsistencies and unknowns: Who but the most gifted mind-reader, for example, can imagine how the Fresh Prince might groove to a Naomi Kawase film? Who foresaw last year’s jury shutting out critics’ darling “Toni Erdmann?” But it’s all in the game, so with a strict warning not to place any monetary bets on my say-so alone, here are my best guesses for tomorrow’s awards.

Palme D’Or: “A Gentle Creature,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Why This Year’s Cannes Lineup May Be Too Edgy for Oscar

Why This Year’s Cannes Lineup May Be Too Edgy for Oscar
For me, tweeting praise for a film at Cannes tends to elicit a two-tiered response from excited movie fans far away from the Croisette. First, quite understandably, come the general exclamations of euphoria and relief that a beloved director or star hasn’t dropped the ball. For days, my mentions will be full of vicarious celebration and can’t-wait-to-see-this buzz from devotees of Sofia Coppola (on wicked form with “The Beguiled”) and Robert Pattinson (hitting a career peak in “Good Time”), which is as it should be. At the same time, however, the good news is met with a more complicated query, usually worded along these lines: “Glad to hear it’s great! Oscar chances?”

As I wrote in my festival preview, Cannes is a festival of mixed fortunes for awards-season geeks: Though it occasionally mints a future titan like “The Artist” or “No Country for Old Men,” its programming
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Cannes Review: ‘The Workshop’ is an Intense Return to Form for Laurent Cantet

Laurent Cantet has been a bit absent in the international cinema scene ever since winning the Palme d’Or for 2008’s The Class. It’s not for a lack of trying, of course. He’s released two feature since then (Foxfire and Return to Ithaca), but they just didn’t catch on the way his best movies (Time Out, Human Resources) have in the past. He’s now back at Cannes in the Un Certain Regard section with The Workshop, (L’Atelier), which has Cantet’s gift of mixing social relevance through wordy dialogue with nail-biting tension, and is as relevant as anything playing at the festival. The tension takes time to build, but when it finally explodes, it brings a whiplash one never sees coming.

Its characters, all high school students off for the summer, attend a workshop for fictional writing headed by well-known French novelist Olivia (Marina Foïs). The multiculturalism is,
See full article at The Film Stage »

Cannes Film Review: ‘The Workshop’

Cannes Film Review: ‘The Workshop’
For how long can a film level-headedly discuss the rules and mechanics of a thriller before becoming something of a thriller itself? That’s the teasing hook, but not even the most loaded question, dangled by “The Workshop,” a sly, supple and repeatedly surprising collision of literary, moral and political lines of debate that marks an enthralling return to form for writer-director Laurent Cantet. Gathering a diverse group of teens to intellectually tussle in a structured educational environment — in this case, a summer creative writing workshop moderated by an acclaimed novelist — the film initially recalls the lively docu-fiction form of Cantet’s 2008 Palme d’Or winner “The Class.” Yet Cantet isn’t out to make the same film twice, deftly wrongfooting viewers as focus is pulled by the group’s most reactionary, volatile member, brilliantly played by newcomer Matthieu Lucci. The tense, excitingly topical result is entirely its own animal,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘The Workshop’ Cannes Review: Art and Politics Collide in Timely Drama

  • The Wrap
‘The Workshop’ Cannes Review: Art and Politics Collide in Timely Drama
Playing in Un Certain Regard at the 2017 Cannes Film Festival, “The Workshop” reteams Laurent Cantet and his co-screenwriter Robin Campillo (also the writer/director of this year’s awards frontrunner “120 Beats Per Minute”) in what initially seems like an attempt to make lightning strike twice. Cantet’s “The Class” scored a stunning Palme d’Or upset at Cannes in 2008 Cannes. His was the last film screened, and few had particularly high hopes for it in a competition that also included Paolo Sorrentino’s “Il Divo” and Ari Folman’s “Waltz With Bashir.” But Cantet’s film about a multi-ethnic Paris high school turned out.
See full article at The Wrap »
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