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Venice Film Review: ‘Above The Law’

Venice Film Review: ‘Above The Law’
It’s no real spoiler to say that the rot goes right to the very top in Jean-François Hensgens and François Troukens’ capable and contained Brussels-set thriller “Above the Law.” The architecture of the seedy crime movie, in which gangster ruthlessness vies with police corruption in a kind of venality derby, is very familiar, as is the hard-boiled conclusion that a criminal with a code is better than a cop with none. But “Above the Law” — which manages to be a less generic title than its French-language original, “Tueurs” (“Killers”) — has more than just the fluid competence of its filmmaking to recommend it. While hardly boasting the most original of plots, it is informed by an authenticity rare for this popular genre with its pre-packaged tropes and formulae. That makes a certain gritty sense when you understand that Troukens, who co-wrote the film with Giordano Gederlini, is himself a fairly notorious ex-gangster; certain elements within this otherwise
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Foreign Productions Flock to Brussels’ Locations, Tax Incentives

Foreign Productions Flock to Brussels’ Locations, Tax Incentives
The city of Brussels has seen a lot of excitement lately. Gangsters have been running wild with racing-car drivers, the Hitler Youth have taken to marching in the street, and a submarine has sunk, costing hundreds of lives. It’s fair to say that, even as far as movie shoots go, Brussels is nothing if not diverse, playing itself in the 1980s for Michael R. Roskam’s crime drama “Racer and the Jailbird,” doubling as wartime Berlin in Amma Asante’s powerful love story “Where Hands Touch,” and even dressing up as Russia in Thomas Vinterberg’s “Kursk,” the story of the Russian submarine that exploded underwater during a naval exercise in 2000. No wonder they’re calling it “the queen of filming locations.”

There are many reasons for the rise of Brussels as an international shooting hub, starting with its location in the heart of Europe, just 80 minutes from Paris and two hours by Eurostar from London
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Heal the Living’ Blu-ray Review

Stars: Emmanuelle Seigner, Tahar Rahim, Anne Dorval, Bouli Lanners | Written by Katell Quillévéré, Gilles Taurand | Directed by Katell Quillévéré

This French-Belgian drama initially allures with an opening sequence that sees teenager Simon Limbres (Gabin Verdet) climb out of his girlfriend’s window and head to the beach with his buddies for a pre-dawn surf. It’s a mesmerising sequence with a dreamlike quality, as Simon observes the magnificence of nature from beneath the waves. On the way home, Simon falls asleep in the passenger seat. He will never wake up. And we will not see filmmaking of this quality again for the next 100 minutes.

Simon’s mother, Marianne (Emmanuelle Seigner), arrives at the hospital, to be told that her son is brain-dead. A young doctor, Thomas (Tahar Rahim), explains the rareness of Simon’s condition: he won’t live, but he has a body full of organs which are ripe for donation.
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Locarno: Films Boutique Handling Denis Côté’s ‘A Skin So Soft,’ Samuel Benchétrit’s’Dog’ (Exclusive)

Locarno: Films Boutique Handling Denis Côté’s ‘A Skin So Soft,’ Samuel Benchétrit’s’Dog’ (Exclusive)
Having represented the most talked-up title at this year’s Karlovy Vary, Berlin-based Films Boutique will hail into Locarno, Europe’s biggest summer festival, with two unannounced titles on its books: “Dog,” the latest from French auteur Samuel Benchetrit (“Macadam Stories”), and “A Skin So Soft,” from Canada’s Denis Côté.

A consistent festival prize winner in a short but prolific career, directing nine feature-length movies from 2005, Côté is best known for “Vic + Flo Saw a Bear,” which won the Alfred Bauer prize for opening up new perspectives at the 2015 Berlinale.

But more than any other festival, Côté’s career has turned around Locarno where a Golden Leopard for best video in 2005 allowed him to give quit his day job. 2008’s “All That She Wants” and 2010’s “Curling” both won best directing at Locarno.

Côté returns to the Swiss festival this year with “A Skin So Soft,” about a group of what is termed “modern-day gladiators,” high-level
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Trailer Watch: Katell Quillévéré’s “Heal the Living” Explores Each Side of a Heart Transplant

“Heal the Living”

“I can’t walk much. I can’t go upstairs,” a woman waiting for a heart transplant explains in the trailer for “Heal the Living.” “I’m not sure I want a dead person’s heart,” she adds.

From director Katell Quillévéré, “Heal the Living” follows two different families whose lives are forever changed by a heart transplant. Marianne and Vincent (Emmanuelle Seigner and Kool Shen) find out their son, Simon (Gabin Verdet), has been in a car accident and is now brain dead. Meanwhile, Claire (Anne Dorval), a 50-year-old woman with a family of her own, is unable to accept that someone will have to die in order for her to continue living.

“This situation makes organ donation possible,” a doctor (Bouli Lanners) gently tells Simon’s heartbroken parents. That’s true from a medical perspective, but it’s an impossible situation for Marianne, Vincent, and Claire.

In an interview with Women and Hollywood (which you can read in full below), Quillévéré emphasized how she wants her film to change the way audiences think of their hearts. “I hope they’ll listen to their heartbeat in a new way,” she said. “I hope that the film will have suggested some new ways of considering this organ that is the heart, at once a fascinating muscle and the keeper of our emotions, our soul. I hope they will consider becoming donors if they aren’t already, and that they will discuss it with people they know.”

Quillévéré co-wrote “Heal the Living” with Gilles Taurand. Based on Maylis de Kerangal’s novel “The Heart,” the film screened at the Toronto International Film Festival last fall.

Love Like Poison,” “Suzanne,” and “À bras les corps” are among Quillévéré’s previous credits.

“Heal the Living” opens Friday in NY. Check out the trailer and our interview with Katell Quillévéré below.

https://medium.com/media/4308221dd6b1ccac5415e29316d3c3b5/href

W&H: Describe the film for us in your own words.

Kq: The film is the story of a heart’s voyage from the body of a teenager who loses his life in an accident to a 50-year-old woman awaiting the transplant that will prolong her life. It’s a scientific, emotional, and spiritual adventure around the question of organ donation.

W&H: What drew you to this story?

Kq: I was really moved by Maylis de Kerangal’s novel, which the movie is based on. Above all, the emotions I’d felt reading the book guided me. I felt close to this story, for my own personal reasons no doubt, and also for its strong cinematic possibilities.

My previous film, “Suzanne,” was also haunted by loss — the death of a mother — and at the same time focused on the living, those who remain, propelled by their urge to live. I’m always interested in stories of resilience.

W&H: What do you want people to think about when they are leaving the theater?

Kq: I hope they’ll listen to their heartbeat in a new way. I hope that the film will have suggested some new ways of considering this organ that is the heart, at once a fascinating muscle and the keeper of our emotions, our soul.

I hope they will consider becoming donors if they aren’t already, and that they will discuss it with people they know.

W&H: What was the biggest challenge in making the film?

Kq: The surfing sequence was extremely difficult to pull off and required a lot of hard work. For example, we had to build special boxes for our cameras, the conditions for the cameraman and the surfers were very difficult and risky, and editing it was a bitch! But it was a great challenge to take on.

The surgery scenes were also very complex, because all of the special effects were on-set. It required months of working hand in hand with real surgeons, who also trained the actors. It was very important to me that the scenes extracting the heart and transplanting it be as realistic as possible.

W&H: How did you get your film funded? Share some insights into how you got the film made.

Kq: The film was financed in the standard way, through government grants and private investors in France and Belgium.

W&H: What does it mean for you to have your film play at Tiff?

Kq: I’m thrilled. Especially to be part of the prestigious Platform competition. And this is my first time in Toronto!

W&H: What advice do you have for other female directors?

Kq: If you want to make films, first of all you have to give yourself permission — tell yourself you’re capable. Then work relentlessly.

W&H: Name your favorite woman-directed film and why.

Kq: I admire Jane Campion’s films because of her great way with storytelling, direction, and emotion.

W&H: Have you seen opportunities for women filmmakers increase over the last year due to the increased attention paid to the issue? If someone asked you what you thought needed to be done to get women more opportunities to direct, what would be your answer?

Kq: For my generation in France today, I don’t think women directors have it any harder than the men do when it comes to getting theirs films made. This is thanks to previous generations’ struggles and the progress of society. Anything a male director can do, a female director can do. That idea needs to take hold everywhere.

Trailer Watch: Katell Quillévéré’s “Heal the Living” Explores Each Side of a Heart Transplant was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Official Us Trailer for Drama 'Heal the Living' Featuring Tahar Rahim

"We can try to figure out what Simon would have wanted." Cohen Media Group has debuted an official Us trailer for the French indie drama Heal the Living, based on the book of the same name (Réparer les vivants) by Maylis De Kerangal. The film stars Tahar Rahim (from A Prophet and The Past) as Thomas Rémige, a doctor who is tasked with caring for a young teenage surfer boy who is in a coma after a car crash. The story follows the lives of three different people, and how they connect after a horrific accident. The cast includes Emmanuelle Seigner, Anne Dorval, Bouli Lanners, Kool Shen, Monia Chokri, and Alice Taglioni. The film already played at film festivals last fall, and opens this month. This has some stunning cinematography, and it looks like a tender, emotional film about grief. This trailer totally got my attention. Here's the official Us
See full article at FirstShowing.net »

Tahar Rahim Attempts to ‘Heal the Living’ in U.S. Trailer for French Drama

After a festival run that included Venice, Toronto, London and more, the U.S. trailer has arrived for Heal the Living, Katell Quillévéré‘s latest drama, which follows the lives of three people, and how they connect through a horrific accident, which leads to a coma. Set for a theatrical release this week, Heal the Living looks to be a tender and emotionally complex look at coping with grief and moving forward in life.

Set with a lush color palette and some striking lens work from Tom Harari and music from Alexandre Desplat, see the trailer below, along with a poster and synopsis for the film starring Tahar Rahim, Emmanuelle Seigner, Anne Dorval, Bouli Lanners and Kool Shen.

An interweaving of three stories connected to each other via an accident.

Heal the Living opens on April 14.
See full article at The Film Stage »

‘Raw’ Review

Stars: Garance Marillier, Ella Rumpf, Rabah Nait Oufella, Laurent Lucas, Joana Preiss, Bouli Lanners, Marion Vernoux, Thomas Mustin, Marouan Iddoub, Jean-Louis Sbille | Written and Directed by Julia Ducournau

I’ve read the hype, I’ve heard of the faintings and walkouts. And I have no idea what film those “newsworthy” stories were based around. It’s certainly not the film that I saw… In fact I found the film to be somewhat timid compared to the online furore surrounding Julia Ducournau’s film. As a strange, ethereal coming-of-age tale, Raw is very, Very, effective. But as some kind of Martyrs-esque French fear-flick shocker? Less so. Much less so. Don’t buy into the hype and instead enjoy an pathos-filled tale of growing up. All wrapped up in the story of cannibal sisters attending veterinary school! Hey, I never said Raw wasn’t a strange film…

The film follows shy vegetarian
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Movie Review – Raw (2016)

Raw, 2016.

Written and Directed by Julia Ducournau.

Starring Garance Marillier, Ella Rumpf, Rabah Nait Oufella, Laurent Lucas, Joana Preiss, Bouli Lanners, Marion Vernoux, and Jean-Louis Sbille.

Synopsis:

When a young vegetarian undergoes a carnivorous hazing ritual at vet school, an unbidden taste for meat begins to grow in her.

A coming-of-age cannibal movie could – as you’d expect – never be a sweet, gentle tale of teenage years. The synopsis alone is enough to draw away your regular cinema-going audience, but those who are smart and semi-curious should flock to see this film. It won’t take long for word-of-mouth to spread around about the film and hopefully draw in the crowds. For a feature directorial debut, Julia Ducournau has immediately cemented herself as one of the 21st century’s most promising talents. Her efforts and tact with the material warrants the aforementioned word-of-mouth and those who may flock.

Raw concerns
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Heal The Living Review: We are all connected.

  • ShockYa
Heal The Living Review: We are all connected.
Heal The Living (Réparer les vivantes) Director: Katell Quillévéré Written by: Katell Quillévéré, Gilles Taurand from the novel “The Heart” by Maylis de Kerangal Cast: Tahar Rahim, Emmanuelle Seigner, Anne Dorval, Bouli Lanners, Kool Shen, Monia Chokri, Alive Taglioni Opens: April 14, 2017 “We’re all connected” sounds like a tagline for a phone company and […]

The post Heal The Living Review: We are all connected. appeared first on Shockya.com.
See full article at ShockYa »

Movie Review – Raw (2017)

Raw, 2017.

Written and Directed by Julia Ducournau.

Starring Garance Marillier, Ella Rumpf, Rabah Nait Oufella, Laurent Lucas, Joana Preiss, Bouli Lanners, Marion Vernoux, and Jean-Louis Sbille.

Synopsis:

When a young vegetarian undergoes a carnivorous hazing ritual at vet school, an unbidden taste for meat begins to grow in her.

You’ve probably seen a coming-of-age story before, now try watching a coming-of-cannibalism arc. However, to be honest, it is frustrating and unfortunate that French-Belgium production Raw has garnered massive notoriety due to a select few film festival moviegoers fainting from the all-out horrific body horror; it’s misrepresentative to the film’s true nature. It’s not some tacky gross-out experience devoid of any substance, but rather a stylistic terror tale of finding one’s own identity, blended with scenes of fingers being eaten like Buffalo Wild Wings. Dinner is served and Raw is one tasty cinematic cuisine… (I apologize
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Raw Movie Review: The Action Is Literally Blood-Curdling

  • ShockYa
Raw Movie Review: The Action Is Literally Blood-Curdling
Raw (Grave) Focus World Reviewed by: Harvey Karten, Shockya Grade: B+ Director: Julia Ducournau Written by: Julia Ducournau Cast: Garance Marillier, Ella Rumpf, Rabah Nait Oufella, Joana Preiss, Laurent Lucas, Bouli Lanners Screened at: Review 1, NYC, 2/1/17 Opens: March 10, 2017 You are sitting in a restaurant with a woman who has been a lifelong […]

The post Raw Movie Review: The Action Is Literally Blood-Curdling appeared first on Shockya.com.
See full article at ShockYa »

Watch: New Red Band Trailer for Acclaimed Cannibal Indie Film 'Raw'

"A deliciously fevered stew of nightmare fuel." Focus World has debuted a juicy red band trailer for a highly acclaimed indie drama titled Raw, which played to rave reviews at the Toronto Film Festival and Fantastic Fest last fall. The film is about a young veterinarian student named Justine, played by Garance Marillier, who is a vegetarian. Everything changes when she's forced to eat raw meat as part of a hazing ritual at the vet school, and things get bloodier from there on out. The cast includes Ella Rumpf, Rabah Nait Oufella, Laurent Lucas, Joana Preiss, Bouli Lanners, Marion Vernoux. This acclaimed film is also playing at Sundance coming up this month. This looks disgusting, but the rave reviews have me interested anyway. Here's the official red band trailer (+ poster) for Julia Ducournau's Raw, direct from YouTube: Everyone in Justine’s family is a vet. And a vegetarian. At
See full article at FirstShowing.net »

‘Elle,’ ‘The Dancer,’ ‘Frantz,’ ‘Staying Vertical’ Vie for Lumiere Awards

‘Elle,’ ‘The Dancer,’ ‘Frantz,’ ‘Staying Vertical’ Vie for Lumiere Awards
Paul Verhoeven’s “Elle,” Stéphanie di Giusto ’s “The Dancer,” François Ozon’s “Frantz” and Alain Guiraudie’s “Staying Vertical” are leading nominations at the 22nd edition of the Lumiere Awards, France’s equivalent to the Golden Globes.

Voted on by Paris-based members of the foreign press, the Lumiere Awards are often considered a milestone in France’s awards season which ends with the Cesar Awards in February.

Besides “Elle” and “Staying Vertical” which premiered at Cannes in competition, other best film contenders include Albert Serra’s “The Death of Louis Xiv,” Léa Fehner’s “Les ogres,” Bertrand Bonello’s “Nocturama” and Stéphane Brizé’s “Une vie.”

Houda Benyamina’s Directors’ Fortnight player “Divines” is vying for best feature debut and its two lead actresses Oulaya Amamra and Déborah Lukumuena are nominated for best female newcomer.

Gaspard Ulliel is nominated for his performance in Xavier Dolan’s “It’s Only
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Venice Film Review: ‘Heal the Living’

Venice Film Review: ‘Heal the Living’
A 17-year-old car crash victim lies brain-dead in hospital, as doctors urgently pitch the virtues of organ donation to his distraught parents; over in another town, a middle-aged mother of two with a severely degenerative heart condition goes on the waiting list for a transplant. What sounds like fodder for a routinely gripping episode of “ER” is complicated with rare depths of personal and sensual detail in French director Katell Quillévéré’s sublimely compassionate, heart-crushing third feature “Heal the Living.” More polished but no less authentically humane than her previous works “Suzanne” and “Love Like Poison,” this spidering ensemble piece — adapted from Maylis de Kerangal’s internationally acclaimed 2014 novel — boasts beautifully pitched performances from a handpicked cast that includes Tahar Rahim and Emmanuelle Seigner. But it’s Quillévéré’s soaring visual and sonic acumen (with an assist from composer Alexandre Desplat, here in matchless form) that suffuses a potentially familiar hospital weeper with true grace.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Tiff 2016 Reveals Platform Line-Up With ‘Jackie,’ ‘Nocturama,’ ‘Moonlight,’ and More

Toronto International Film Festival continues to add to its already eclectic slate by announcing their Platform line-up today. Beginning last year as a special program to highlight auteur-driven features from around the world, this year’s line-up looks remarkably strong, opening with Bertrand Bonello‘s Paris-set terrorism drama Nocturama.

Also featuring new films from Fien Troch, Zacharias Kunuk, Kiyoshi Kurosawa, Ivan Sen, Katell Quillévéré, Khyentse Norbu, Pablo Larraín, William Oldroyd, Mijke de Jong, Barry Jenkins, Mathieu Denis, and Simon Lavoie, check out the line-up below.

Daguerrotype (Le Secret de la chambre noire) Kiyoshi Kurosawa, France/Japan/Belgium

World Premiere

Kiyoshi Kurosawa makes his first film outside Japan with this French-language ghost romance fantasy, about an aging photographer whose obsession with an archaic technique draws his young assistant and beautiful daughter into a dark and mysterious world. Starring Tahar Rahim, Constance Rousseau, Olivier Gourmet, and Mathieu Amalric. ***

Goldstone Ivan Sen, Australia
See full article at The Film Stage »

New Talent Emerges From Belgian Cinema Scene

New Talent Emerges From Belgian Cinema Scene
Although the Dardenne brothers cast a long shadow over French-language Belgian cinema, a new saviour emerged just last year. Premiering in Directors’ Fortnight, Jaco Van Dormael’s religious comedy “The Brand New Testament” – in which God lives with his feisty daughter in modern-day Brussels – not only became a cult hit internationally, it also brought in the elusive domestic attendances that will enable the indigenous film industry to grow.

“The main concern we have is to find a local audience for our films,” says Jeanette Brunfaut of promotion agency Centre du cinéma et de l’audiovisuel de la Fédération Wallonie Bruxelles (Cca). “So far we have been more successful outside the country than inside, unlike Flemish films, for instance. And the big change was ‘The Brand New Testament,’ which was the biggest hit for us since the late ’90s. It’s not something that happens very often, and it’s really
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Dardenne Brothers’ First Cannes Win Opened Door for Belgian Cinema

Dardenne Brothers’ First Cannes Win Opened Door for Belgian Cinema
When Luc and Jean-Pierre Dardenne’s “Rosetta” snatched the Palme D’Or from under Pedro Almodóvar’s nose in 1999 — the Spaniard was considered the hot favorite with “All About My Mother” that year — it was one of the biggest upsets in Cannes history. At the time, the David Cronenberg-led jury was accused of favoring, and possibly even patronizing, the underdog, just to snub commercial European arthouse cinema.

Fast-forward 17 years and not only are the Dardennes eyeing the prospect of an unprecedented three-time win, but Belgium’s Wallonia region has become a fertile breeding ground for talent, with a star system that has brought us Benoît Poelvoorde, François Damiens, Cécile de France and Bouli Lanners.

Today, the importance of “Rosetta” to the French-speaking film industry cannot be overstated.

“There was hardly an industry in Wallonia before this amazing Palme d’Or win,” says Philippe Reynaert, CEO of funding body Wallimage
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Ex-con Francois Troukens to co-direct 'Above The Law'

  • ScreenDaily
Ex-con Francois Troukens to co-direct 'Above The Law'
Exclusive: Former gangster Francois Troukens will co-direct the $7m crime thriller.

Reformed gangster Francois Troukens turned Belgian media celebrity is to co-direct new $7m (€6m) crime thriller Above The Law (Au-Dessus Des Lois).

Jacques-Henri Bronckart of Belgian outfit Versus has revealed details of the production, which is due to shoot in the summer and will be handled internationally by TF1.

The film centres on a small-time crook who is framed for murder and has to go on the run to prove his innocence.

Troukens was an armed robber, targeting security vans in the 1990s. He was convicted and sentenced to 28 years in prison while on the run and was finally caught in 2004.

In jail, he studied philosophy and turned his life around prior to being released conditionally for good behaviour in 2010. Since his release, he has gone on to become a well-known TV personality, with his own show, Un Crime Parfait.

The former
See full article at ScreenDaily »

'The Innocents' wins Colcoa audience award

  • ScreenDaily
'The Innocents' wins Colcoa audience award
Anne Fontaine’s drama claimed the Colcoa Audience Award as the nine-day celebration of French cinema came to a close in Los Angeles.

Music Box holds Us rights to the film (pictured) about wartime atrocities committed by the Nazis at a Polish convent.

Christian Carion’s Come What May earned the Colcoa Lafca Critics Award and will open in the Us through Cohen Media Group.

Made In France by Nicolas Boukhrief won the Audience Special Prize while the Critics Special Prize went to Bouli Lanners’ The First, The Last.

The Best Documentary Award went to Tomorrow co-directed by Cyril Dion and Mélanie Laurent, while The First Feature Awards went to Film Movement’s Neither Heaven Nor Earth by Clément Cogitore.

It’s Caviar by Sarah Lelouch won the audience award in the Short Competition category, while Mother(s) from Maïmouna Doucouré won the jury award.

Natalie Beder’s Millions Of Tears won both the juried award and the
See full article at ScreenDaily »
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