Herschel Bernardi - News Poster

News

Love with the Proper Stranger

What are two individualistic, highly motivated movie stars supposed to do when faced with an unimaginative studio system eager to misuse their talents? Natalie Wood and Steve McQueen collaborate with a great writer, director and producer for an urban romance with an eye on the sexual double standard. It’s a hybrid production: a gritty drama that’s also a calculated career move.

Love with the Proper Stranger

Blu-ray

Kl Studio Classics

1963 / B&W / 1:85 widescreen / 100 min. / Street Date September 19, 2017 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95

Starring: Natalie Wood, Steve McQueen, Edie Adams, Tom Bosley, Herschel Bernardi, Harvey Lembeck, Agusta Ciolli, Nina Varela, Marilyn Chris, Richard Dysart, Arlene Golonka, Tony Mordente, Nobu McCarthy, Richard Mulligan, Vic Tayback, Dyanne Thorne, Val Avery.

Cinematography: Milton Krasner

Film Editor: Aaron Stell

Original Music: Elmer Bernstein

Written by Arnold Schulman

Produced by Alan J. Pakula

Directed by Robert Mulligan

1963’s Love with the Proper Stranger is
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Review: "The Front" (1976) Starring Woody Allen; Twilight Time Blu-ray Release

  • CinemaRetro
“Don’T Mess With Huac”

By Raymond Benson

Perhaps the first film we saw that convinced us that Woody Allen could actually act—i.e., not be his nebbish, nervous comic persona from his early directorial efforts—was Martin Ritt’s 1976 comedy/drama, The Front, which appeared a year before Allen’s Annie Hall.

The Front was perhaps the first Hollywood film to tackle the subject of “the blacklist” that occurred in the movie industry in the late 1940s and throughout most of the 50s. This abominable practice was due to the investigation of “Communist infiltration” in Tinsel Town by Huac—the House Un-American Activities Committee. It was truly a dark time in U.S. history, one in which friends were pressured to “name names” or face the prospect of unemployment or worse, such as jail time. Note that the Hollywood studio heads were responsible for the actual blacklisting. The
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Stakeout on Dope Street

With a title like this you know it has to be good. Irvin Kershner got his start directing on this small-scale tale of kids and crime. Jonathan Haze and Abby Dalton are standouts in the cast, while the uncredited executive producer who put up the cash is said to have been Roger Corman. It's a beautiful widescreen transfer -- the film was one of the first features shot by Haskell Wexler, who is also uncredited. Stakeout on Dope Street DVD-r The Warner Archive Collection 1958 / B&W / 1:85 widescreen / 83 min. / Street Date June 22, 2016 / available through the WBshop / 21.99 Starring Yale Wexler, Jonathon Haze, Morris Miller (Stever Marlo), Abby Dalton, Allen Kramer, Herman Rudin, Philip Mansour, Andrew J. Fenady, Herschel Bernardi, Coleman Francis. Cinematography Mark Jeffrey (Haskell Wexler) Film Editor Melvin Sloan Original Music Richard Markowitz Story and Screenplay by Andrew J. Fenady, Irvin Kershner, Irvin Schwartz Produced by Andrew J. Fenady Directed
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Cinema Gadfly – Episode 20 – The Front

My guest for this month is West Anthony, and he’s joined me to discuss the film he chose for me, the 1976 comedy-drama film The Front. You can follow the show on Twitter @cinemagadfly.

Show notes:

Not sure what happened to the audio in the introduction, apologies! The Hollywood blacklist is a term for the treatment of people in the entertainment industry who refused to name names to the House Un-American Activities Committee from 1947 to 1960 For a more in depth take on the blacklist, check out the latest season of the phenomenal You Must Remember This podcast WonderCon is a comic book convention that was held annually in Sf until it was cruelly moved to the La area in 2012. Yes I’m still bitter about it. West also recommends the Gabrielle de Cuir directed Thirty Years of Treason by Eric Bentley Among the people famously blacklisted were Lillian Hellman, Lionel Stander,
See full article at CriterionCast »

Al Pacino Talks Danny Collins

Al Pacino stars as aging 1970s rocker Danny Collins, who can’t give up his hard-living ways.But when his manager (Christopher Plummer) uncovers a 40-year-old undelivered letter written to him by John Lennon, he decides to change course and embarks on a heartfelt journey to rediscover his family, find true love and begin a second act.

Recently, Al Pacino sat down with a small group of press to talk about taking on the role of Danny Collins, his relationship with Bobby Cannavale, and passing John Lennon in Central Park. Check it out below.

Inspired by a true story, Danny Collins co-stars Annette Bening and Jennifer Garner. Written and directed by Dan Fogelman (writer of Last Vegas and Crazy, Stupid, Love).

(Al Pacino starts out…)

Al Pacino: Dan wanted me to be in the picture. He saw me in the part, and that’s always kind of, to me, it’s always surprising.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Screenwriter Walter Bernstein at 95: Still Front and Center

Ask Walter Bernstein what makes for a good screenplay, and he’ll answer you with a (possibly apocryphal) story about Henry David Thoreau. “He was living out at Walden Pond and a friend came to tell him that Samuel Morse had just made the first successful wireless telegraph transmission from Boston to Portland, or something like that,” Bernstein says with the practiced storyteller’s delight in a well-told tale. “And Thoreau asked, ‘But what did it say?’ That’s always stuck with me. With all the technology and everything else, what’s it about?”

“What’s it about?” is a question Bernstein, who turned 95 this month, has been asking himself in one form or another for most of his 65-year career, which has stretched from the early days of live television to the modern era of binge watching, and from the lionized “golden age” of the studio system to the low-budget indie renaissance.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Never-Aired Pilot Highlights Dr. Kildare The Complete First Season

  • Comicmix
We here at ComicMix celebrate all manner of pop culture from today’s obvious hits to the arcane wonders of yesteryear. every now and then we get a notice about something that seems just outside our realm of interest but there’s a thing or two that grabs us. Something like an unaired pilot to the legendary Dr. Kildare series is one of those things. Not only that, but the series gave us Richard Chamberlain as a star (long before he was resurrected for Leverage). The show not only boasted an impressive guest cast, as noted below but it featured some of the best writers working in television including a pre-Star Trek Gene Roddenberry. So, here’s the press release for those who remember and remain interested:

Warner Archive Collection continues to unveil some of the finest series in television history with its release this week of Dr. Kildare: The First Complete Season.
See full article at Comicmix »

DVD Review: "Peter Gunn:- The Complete Series" Released By Timeless Video

  • CinemaRetro
Normal 0 false false false En-us X-none X-none

By Harvey F. Chartrand

Peter Gunn: The Complete Series is now available for the first time ever as a 12-dvd box set from Timeless Media Group… all 114 episodes, with a running time of over 58 hours.

Peter Gunn – created and produced by Blake Edwards – ran for three seasons – from 1958 to 1961. This classic detective show was a delightful blend of film noir and fifties cool, featuring a modern jazz score by Henry Mancini (a bonus CD of the soundtrack is included in the set), outbreaks of the old ultra-violence, a gallery of eccentric and sleazy characters (usually informants, gangsters and Beat Generation bohemians), and great acting by series leads Craig Stevens (as Gunn), Lola Albright (as his squeeze, sultry nightclub singer Edie Hart) and Herschel Bernardi (as Gunn’s friend and competitor Lieutenant Jacoby, who seems to work all by himself 24 hours a day
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Remembering Annette Cardona

  • Backstage
One of my most indelible memories of my dear friend Annette Cardona, who passed away last Wednesday at age 63 after a swift and unexpected battle with cancer, is sitting with her at the opening night of the revival of "A Chorus Line" a few years ago. Tears streamed down her face through most of the performance, partially because her mentor and pal Michael Bennett had asked her to play one of the major roles in the original New York production, but after a long and arduous decision process, Annette had chosen instead to take another juicy offer—to play Aldonza/Dulcinea in "The Man of La Mancha" on Broadway opposite Herschel Bernardi.But neither the memory of her fast friendship with the late great Bennett nor the loss of a plum role in a historic production was the main reason "A Chorus Line" brought tears to Annette's eyes. Granted, as she was.
See full article at Backstage »

See also

Credited With | External Sites