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Crazy for Polka Dots: Minnie Mouse’s Evolving Style

Over the years Minnie Mouse has transformed from sassy flapper girl to sweet style icon.

Known for her bright bows and polka dots, Mickey’s forever gal has inspired major fashion designers to create their own line of Minnie-inspired frocks over the past decade. And she continues to update her look — and gain new outfits — as Disney creates new adventures for her across the media landscape.

“I always tell people that she’s as much an actress as Meryl Streep,” says animator Rob Laduca, executive producer of “Mickey and the Roadster Racers,” in its first season on Disney Channel and Disney Junior. “Like any other actress, she’s given a part to play and wears an outfit for that character.”

On “Mickey and the Roadster Races,” for example, Minnie has an everyday outfit of a pink dress with polka dots — a traditional look for the famous toon character — plus a garage outfit and racing duds.

“Like everything
See full article at Variety - Film News »

When Elvis Costello Wrote a Song For ‘Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool,’ He Understood ‘Avoiding Your Own Reflection’

When Elvis Costello Wrote a Song For ‘Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool,’ He Understood ‘Avoiding Your Own Reflection’
Pop stars write closing credit songs all the time. But the story behind Elvis Costello’s moving song “You Shouldn’t Look at Me That Way,” about an older woman’s complicated allure, is crazy. Producer Barbara Broccoli and Peter Turner went to see his show at the London Palladium and were shocked to see a photo of Gloria Grahame on the stage. When they went backstage, they asked Costello to write a song for “Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool,” starring Annette Bening as the aging Hollywood actress who has an affair with younger actor Peter Turner (Jamie Bell).

Read More:Annette Bening Finds the Truth in the Very Strange Tale of Gloria Grahame and ‘Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool’

Costello had hung out with Alan Bleasdale, the playwright of one of the plays Turner starred in during that period. But while Costello is a film buff
See full article at Indiewire »

When Elvis Costello Wrote a Song For ‘Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool,’ He Understood ‘Avoiding Your Own Reflection’

When Elvis Costello Wrote a Song For ‘Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool,’ He Understood ‘Avoiding Your Own Reflection’
Pop stars write closing credit songs all the time. But the story behind Elvis Costello’s moving song “You Shouldn’t Look at Me That Way,” about an older woman’s complicated allure, is crazy. Producer Barbara Broccoli and Peter Turner went to see his show at the London Palladium and were shocked to see a photo of Gloria Grahame on the stage. When they went backstage, they asked Costello to write a song for “Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool,” starring Annette Bening as the aging Hollywood actress who has an affair with younger actor Peter Turner (Jamie Bell).

Read More:Annette Bening Finds the Truth in the Very Strange Tale of Gloria Grahame and ‘Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool’

Costello had hung out with Alan Bleasdale, the playwright of one of the plays Turner starred in during that period. But while Costello is a film buff
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

France Gall, French Singer Who Won 1965 Eurovision Song Contest and Inspired ‘My Way,’ Dies at 70

France Gall, French Singer Who Won 1965 Eurovision Song Contest and Inspired ‘My Way,’ Dies at 70
French singer France Gall has died. She was 70.

Gall, who owned France’s pop charts for decades and who inspired “My Way,” died Sunday morning in Paris’ American Hospital. Cause of death was a severe infection complicated by cancer, according to her publicist.

Born Isabelle Gall in 1947, she was the daughter of a songwriter who had penned hits for Edith Piaf and Charles Aznavour.

After her first theatre and radio performances, Gall was signed to a record label while still a minor, eventually releasing her first single in October 1963, “Ne Sois Pas Bete,” a French cover of the Laurie Sisters’ “Stand A Little Closer.
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

With a ‘Film Stars’ Song in Contention, Rock Star Elvis Costello Reflects on Moonlighting for the Movies

With a ‘Film Stars’ Song in Contention, Rock Star Elvis Costello Reflects on Moonlighting for the Movies
Elvis Costello wrote the closing song for the new movie “Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool,” but it’s a classic from his own canon that director Paul McGuigan planted as an Easter egg for music buffs. Costello’s “Pump It Up” is heard early on in the film to establish the late ’70s time frame, right before a scene that has the American actress Gloria Grahame (played by Annette Bening) meeting her younger Liverpudlian boyfriend (Jamie Bell) for the first time. Just after “Pump It Up” is heard on the soundtrack, the two lovers-to-be dance to “Boogie Oogie Oogie” — a cheeky nod to one of the silliest awards upsets of all time, when the ephemeral disco group A Taste of Honey famously beat Costello for the best new artist Grammy.

“You know what? It didn’t register,” admits Costello, who didn’t get the embedded joke when he first saw the film, and whom the
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Johnny Hallyday, the Elvis of France, Dead at Age 74

  • PEOPLE.com
Johnny Hallyday, the Elvis of France, Dead at Age 74
French rock idol Johnny Hallyday, remembered as the nation’s answer to Elvis Presley in the 1960s, has died at age 74.

The legendary singer died from lung cancer, his family confirmed.

Johnny Hallyday has left us,” Hallyday’s wife, Laeticia, said in a statement to The Guardian. “I write these words without believing them. But yet, it’s true. My man is no longer with us. He left us tonight as he lived his whole life, with courage and dignity.”

Beginning in 1960, Hallyday was the heartbeat of Gallic rock n’ roll, becoming its best known and best-selling artist for nearly six decades.
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Johnny Hallyday, Singer Known as the ‘French Elvis,’ Dies at 74

Johnny Hallyday, Singer Known as the ‘French Elvis,’ Dies at 74
French rock star and actor Johnny Hallyday, who became the first Gallic singer to popularize rock ’n’ roll in France and sold over 110 million records during a music career spanning over half a century, has died, according to Agence France Presse. He was 74 and had been fighting cancer for several months.

Widely known as the “French Elvis,” Hallyday began his singing career at the end of the 1950s specializing in French-language cover versions of famous songs by artists like Gene Vincent, Eddie Cochrane and Elvis Presley — whose example inspired him to become a singer.

At the beginning of 1960 Hallyday released his first album, “Hello! Johnny.” The following year he performed at France’s first rock festival at the Palais des Sports in Paris, setting off a near-riot that led to a ban on rock ’n’ roll shows for several months.

Hallyday’s covers instantly proved a successful way for American rock ’n’ roll to infiltrate its way
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Cannes Director Thierry Fremaux On Harvey Weinstein Scandal: ‘It’s Not a Problem For the Film Community, It’s a Problem For the World’

Cannes Director Thierry Fremaux On Harvey Weinstein Scandal: ‘It’s Not a Problem For the Film Community, It’s a Problem For the World’
Revelations about Harvey Weinstein’s history of sexual assault jolted the film industry around the world. Yet even as victims continue to speak out, much of the community has been stunned into another silence.

Generations of former Weinstein employees, including those who toiled on his staff during the seminal Miramax days, refuse to speak publicly for fear that the association could make them complicit. Others who collaborated with Weinstein — an expansive Venn diagram of publicists, sales agents, programmers, and their institutions — remain wary of saying anything that could somehow drag them further into his orbit.

The Cannes Film Festival, where Weinstein was the steward for Palme d’Or winners “sex, lies and videotape” and “Pulp Fiction,” is no exception. Taking precedence over any other conversation, the world’s most revered gathering of international cineastes prefer to fixate on the art form. Cannes didn’t create Weinstein, but it was the
See full article at Indiewire »

Bindi Irwin Celebrates Late Father’s Hollywood Walk of Fame Announcement—See Who Else Will Get a Star!

Bindi Irwin Celebrates Late Father’s Hollywood Walk of Fame Announcement—See Who Else Will Get a Star!
Congratulations to the Hollywood Walk of Fame’s Class of 2018!

On Thursday, the Hollywood Chamber of Commerce announced the A-list roster of actors, musicians and television personalities, and the celebrity recipients took to social media to share the happy news.

“I am beyond excited to share with you all that we have just received the news that Dad will be honoured with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame,” Bindi Irwin, 18, wrote on Instagram to celebrate her late father Steve Irwin‘s honor.

“Dad changed the world by reaching out to people through their television screens to bring them
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Bindi Irwin 'Beyond Excited' for Dad Steve Irwin to Receive a Star on Hollywood Walk of Fame

Bindi Irwin 'Beyond Excited' for Dad Steve Irwin to Receive a Star on Hollywood Walk of Fame
Bindi Irwin is "beyond excited" for her father's latest honor.

The late Crocodile Hunter star Steve Irwin will receive a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in 2018, the Hollywood Chamber of Commerce announced on Thursday.

Related: Bindi Irwin Pays Tribute to Late Father Steve on His 55th Birthday

"Beyond excited to share with you all that we have just received news that Dad will be honoured with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame,
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

‘The Leftovers’ Review: The Most Profoundly Moving Boat Orgy Honoring a 92-Year-Old Lion You’ll Ever See

‘The Leftovers’ Review: The Most Profoundly Moving Boat Orgy Honoring a 92-Year-Old Lion You’ll Ever See
[Editor’s Note: The following review contains spoilers for “The Leftovers” through Season 3, Episode 5, “It’s a Matt, Matt, Matt, Matt World.”]

Immediate Reaction

When Damon Lindelof said “The Leftovers” had “more dongs than ‘Game of Thrones,'” oh boy did he ever mean it. Even before the massive, 11-hour, seaward orgy began, “It’s a Matt, Matt, Matt, Matt World” kicked off with a buck naked French sailor running full speed down the narrow corridors of his ship, his penis bouncing between his legs in slow-motion. Rarely has the male body been celebrated so thoroughly on television, and we applaud the feminist spirit of Lindelof and director Nicole Kassell, who made sure for every bare-breasted woman with only a lion’s tail covering her backside, there was a man whose front-side tail was given the same unflinching attention.

But even more than the equality, we remain impressed — perhaps more so than ever — with how well “The Leftovers” blends absurdity with substance. Among the people in headdresses and people getting eating by lions (Ok,
See full article at Indiewire »

Au Bonheur Des Dames (The Ladies’ Paradise) May 6th at St. Louis Art Museum – Live Music by The Poor People of Paris

The silent French film Au Bonheur Des Dames (1930 – aka Ladies’ Paradise) screens Saturday May 6th at 11am at The St. Louis Art Museum (Forest Park, 1 Fine Arts Dr, St. Louis, Mo). The film will be accompanied by Elsie Parker and The Poor People of Paris. Tickets for this event are $15 general admission and $10 for museum members. Tickets can be purchased in advance from Metrotix or by calling 314.534.1111.

Julien Duvivier’s final silent film is a modern retelling of Emile Zola’s panoramic chronicle of mid-19th-century Parisian society, centering on a small fabric shop struggling to survive in the shadow of a luxury department store. With expressionistic shades of Erich von Stroheim and G.W. Pabst, the film captures the rhythms of urban life and creates a stinging portrait of capitalist ruthlessness, class tensions, and sexual competition. Scott Foundas in the Village Voice calls the film “an orgy of pure cinema,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Q&A: Urban Poet-Turned-Director Fabien Marsaud on his Anticipated Debut ‘Step by Step’

Q&A: Urban Poet-Turned-Director Fabien Marsaud on his Anticipated Debut ‘Step by Step’
Paris– Fabien Marsaud, aka Grand Corps Malade, is a popular French slam poet who has been filling concert halls across the country and has collaborated with some of France’s biggest music stars including Johnny Halliday and Charles Aznavour. But before undertaking this career in music, Marsaud was a promising basketball player whose dreams of becoming a professional athlete got smashed by an accident that left him quadraplegic for some time.

Step by Step” is the feature film adaptation of his autobiographical novel “Patients,” a bestseller which chronicles Marsaud’s experiences in a physical therapy center where he made true friends and regained, to some extent, the use of his limbs. “Step by Step” is produced by Mandarin Cinema, the Paris-based outfit behind “Oss 117,””Les Kairas,””Frantz” and “The Innocents.”

Gaumont is co-producing, selling and will be distributing in “Step by Step” in March. As with “Intouchables,” Gaumont has been
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Scorpion Releasing Announces Upcoming Blu-ray of And Then There Were None (1974)

  • DailyDead
Ten strangers. One hotel. One item on the agenda: murder. Tensions escalate as the body count rises in Peter Collinson's And Then There Were None, a 1974 adaptation of Agatha Christie's Ten Little Indians that's coming out on Blu-ray with a new HD master from Scorpion Releasing, Variety Films, and Kino Video in 2017.

From Scorpion Releasing: "Scorpion Releasing, in conjunction with Variety Films, coming in 2017, from a brand new 2016 HD master, Peter Collinson's Ten Little Indians (aka And There Were None) starring Oliver Reed, Richard Attenborough, Herbert Lom, Elke Sommers, Maria Rohm, Stephane Audran, Charles Aznavour, Gert Frobe, Adolfo Celi and Orson Welles. It will be released on DVD and BluRay, and sold at retailers via Kino."

Synopsis (via Blu-ray.com): "A group is invited, under false pretenses, to an isolated hotel in the Iranian desert. After dinner, a cassette tape accuses them all of crimes that they have gotten away with.
See full article at DailyDead »

Photo Flash: First Look at Bobby Steggert, Mara Davi & More in My Paris at Long Wharf Theatre

Long Wharf Theatre travels back in time to the romance and fun of Montmartre in the late 1800s in its production of the musical My Paris, an imaginative retelling of the life of the artist Henri Toulouse-Lautrec, directed by Tony Award-winning director Kathleen Marshall, with music from the legendary French performer Charles Aznavour, and a book by Pulitzer Prize-winner Alfred Uhry, and with English lyrics and musical adaptations by Tony-winner Jason Robert Brown The Last Five Years. Check out a first look below
See full article at BroadwayWorld.com »

Candy

The dirty book of the '60s became an all-star dirty movie with Brando, Burton, Starr, Coburn, Matthau, Astin, Aznavour and Huston all wanting a taste of the Swedish nymphet Ewa Aulin. Camerawork by Rotunno, designs by Dean Tavoularis, effects by Doug Trumbull -- and the best material is Marlon Brando making goofy faces as a sub-Sellers Indian guru. Candy Blu-ray Kl Studio Classics 1968 / Color / 1:78 widescreen / 124 min. /Candy e il suo pazzo mondo / Street Date May 17, 2016 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95 Starring Ewa Aulin, Charles Aznavour, Marlon Brando, James Coburn, Richard Burton, John Astin, John Huston, Walter Matthau, Ringo Starr, Anita Pallenberg, Elsa Martinelli. Cinematography Giuseppe Rotunno Production Designer Dean Tavoularis Opening and closing designed by Douglas Trumbull Film Editor Giancarlo Cappelli, Frank Santillo Original Music Dave Grusin Writing credits Buck Henry from the book by Terry Southern and Mason Hoffenberg Produced by Robert Haggiag Directed by Christian Marquand

Reviewed
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Bobby Steggert, Mara Davi & More to Reprise Roles in My Paris at Long Wharf Theatre; Kathleen Marshall Directs

Long Wharf Theatre travels back in time to the romance and fun of Montmartre in the late 1800s in its production of the musical My Paris, a imaginative retelling of the life of the artist Henri Toulouse-Lautrec, directed by Tony Award-winning director Kathleen Marshall, with music from the legendary French performer Charles Aznavour, and a book by Pulitzer Prize-winner Alfred Uhry, and with English lyrics and musical adaptations by Tony-winner Jason Robert Brown The Last Five Years.
See full article at BroadwayWorld.com »

10 Underseen Films By Alfred Hitchcock and François Truffaut

In 1962, two filmmakers met in a room at Universal Studios to discuss (what else?) cinema. Those directors were François Truffaut and Alfred Hitchcock. (Providing assistance was French-language translator Helen Scott.) Together, they talked for over 50 hours, poring over every film the old master ever made. In 1967, Truffaut published what has universally come to be known as an essential text, titled Hitchcock/Truffaut, which contains rich and detailed transcripts of the extraordinary conversation.

Filmmaker Kent Jones‘ documentary about this historic meeting of the minds is now out, which inspired The Film Stage to look back at some of the forgotten, overlooked, and underrated films from these two beloved directors. The following ten titles contain all of the nuance, mystery and joy that we’ve come to expect from Hitchcock and Truffaut, with many overlapping themes and stylistic sensibilities.

Please enjoy the list, and don’t forget to suggest your own favorites in the comments.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Reboot of Classic Christie Mega-Bestseller to Be Directed by Oscar-Nominated Filmmaker

'And Then There Were None' movie with Barry Fitzgerald, Walter Huston, June Duprez, Louis Hayward and Roland Young. 'And Then There Were None' movie remake to be directed by Oscar nominee Morten Tyldum One of the best-known Agatha Christie novels, And Then There Were None will be getting another big-screen transfer. 20th Century Fox has acquired the movie rights to the literary suspense thriller first published in the U.K. (as Ten Little Niggers) in 1939. Morten Tyldum, this year's Best Director Academy Award nominee for The Imitation Game, is reportedly set to direct. The source for this story is Deadline.com, which adds that Tyldum himself “helped hone the pitch” for the acquisition while Eric Heisserer (A Nightmare on Elm Street 2010, The Thing 2011) will handle the screenplay adaptation. And Then There Were None is supposed to have sold more than 100 million copies worldwide, thus holding the
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Christie's "None" Gets A New Film Adaptation

Still the best-selling novelist of all time with over two billion books sold (beaten only by the Bible and Shakespeare), Dame Agatha Christie's singularly most famous mystery is set to get another film adaptation.

"The Imitation Game" director Morten Tyldum has been hired to helm a new film version of "And Then There Were None" which 20th Century Fox has just acquired the feature film rights to.

Eric Heisserer ("The Thing," "Final Destination 5") has been hired to pen the script for the new version which Shawn Levy, Dan Levine, Dan Cohen and Hilary Strong will produce. The new one which reportedly boasts a "take that got the Christie estate excited."

The story follows ten strangers who are invited to an isolated island for a dinner party at the behest of a mysterious host. It's soon revealed they have been cut off from the mainland, and one of the
See full article at Dark Horizons »
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