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Richard Hatch, First Captain Apollo on Battlestar Galactica, Dead at 71

  • TVfanatic
Richard Hatch, best known for his role as Captain Apollo on the original Battlestar Galactica, has passed away from cancer.

His friend, composer Bear McReary broke the news on Twitter today.

Hatch had been in hospice care after a long battle with pancreatic cancer. He was 71 years old.

Hatch began his long career in theater before catching his first television break on All My Children in 1971.

His theater credits include runs in the Los Angeles Resperatory Theater as well as in Chicago and off-Broadway roles.

He got his first big break with a role on The Streets of San Francisco in its final season as Inspector Dan Robbins.

It was on Battlestar Galactica in 1978 where Richard Hatch became a household name.

As Captain Apollo, Hatch starred alongside Dirk Benedict and Lorne Greene for one season.

Yes, the original series of Battlestar Galactica was on the air for only one season,
See full article at TVfanatic »

Richard Hatch Dies: ‘Battlestar Galactica’s Captain Apollo Was 71

Richard Hatch, who starred alongside Lorne Greene and Dirk Benedict in the 1970s sci-fi series Battlestar Galactica, has died. He was 71. Ronald D. Moore, who created the 2000s reboot of the show in which Hatch also appeared, tweeted the news: Richard Hatch was a good man, a gracious man, and a consummate professional. His passing is a heavy blow to the entire BSG family. — Ronald D. Moore (@RonDMoore) February 7, 2017 Alec Peters, who is working on the…
See full article at Deadline TV »

Battlestar Galactica Movie Targets Hunger Games Director

  • MovieWeb
Battlestar Galactica Movie Targets Hunger Games Director
After languishing in development since 2009, Universal Pictures' Battlestar Galactica movie is finally moving forward in the right direction. We reported last month that the studio has brought on Michael De Luca, Scott Stuber and Dylan Clark to produce this sci-fi reboot, but now even more progress is being made. Today we have word that HBO's Westworld co-creator Lisa Joy has signed on to write the screenplay, with Francis Lawrence (The Hunger Games: Mockingjay) circling the project as a director.

This new report from Deadline doesn't reveal if Francis Lawrence is in negotiations, or if he's just interested in taking on this coveted directorial gig. Much like the original 1978 TV series, and the critically-acclaimed 2003 TV reboot, this project will follow the longstanding battle between humans and the Cylons, although no specific plot details were given. We reported back in 2014 that this project will be a full reboot that is more
See full article at MovieWeb »

Remaking 'Roots' should have been an awful idea. But the new one's great.

  • Hitfix
Remaking 'Roots' should have been an awful idea. But the new one's great.
"This is how I heard about the boy, Kunta Kinte," Alex Haley (Laurence Fishburne) tells us in the opening moments of History's new miniseries Roots. "And this is how I'll tell you the story." The importance of stories, and the way that we tell them, form the heart of the new Roots, which debuts Monday night at 9 (the eight-hour project will air over four straight nights, simulcast on History, A&E, and Lifetime). From the time we meet Kunta (Malachi Kirby) as a young man abducted from his home in Juffure, Gambia by slavers, until we leave his descendants over 100 years later in the post-Civil War American South, Roots prizes the power of stories and tradition, from how Kunta's Uncle Silla (Derek Luke) teaches him the ways of the Mandinka warrior, to how Kunta's grandson Chicken George (Rege-Jean Page) will tell his own offspring stories about the grandfather he never met,
See full article at Hitfix »

Roots The Complete Series Comes to Blu-Ray in June

  • Cinelinx
Even as a new version of the classic mini-series is in the works, Warner Bros. is aiming to please fans by bringing the entire original series of Roots to the high definition format with a slew of bonus features. Come inside to learn more!

If you're a fan of the original Roots series, or weren't old enough to remember the iconic mini-series, then you're in luck. Today WB has announced a new blu-ray set to bring the entire series to blu-ray with loads of special features that dive into the heart of the story on June 7, 2016. All the details are below:

The groundbreaking, acclaimed television miniseries that captivated the entire nation and won multiple awards, Roots, will be released on Blu-ray™ for the first time, by Warner Bros. Home Entertainment (Wbhe) on June 7, 2016. The legendary family saga, which follows the inspiring story of Kunta Kinte (LeVar Burton, Transformers: Rescue Bots,
See full article at Cinelinx »

Universal Sets Its Sights On Space With A Battlestar Galactica Movie Franchise

Since its debut in 1978, Battlestar Galactica has never really been absent from popular culture. That first series may have only run for one season, but it has been rebooted, re-imagined and re-worked more times than anyone over the age of 35 would probably care to remember. Despite more failures to launch than successful orbits, Universal has assembled a team of powerhouse producers to make a Battlestar Galactica movie franchise a reality.

Michael De Luca (Captain Phillips, Moneyball, The Social Network, and the Fifty Shades franchise), Scott Stuber (The Break-Up, The Kingdom, Ted) and Dylan Clark (The Heat, the Planet Of The Apes franchise) are combining their considerable forces to begin piecing together what the studio hopes will become a movie series of the tent-pole variety. While that sounds, perhaps, ill-advised, it is certainly the case that the Battlestar Galactica brand has enormous potential for development.

Created by Glen A. Larson (Magnum P.
See full article at We Got This Covered »

‘Battlestar Galactica’ Reboot Names Michael De Luca, Scott Stuber as Producers

  • The Wrap
‘Battlestar Galactica’ Reboot Names Michael De Luca, Scott Stuber as Producers
Battlestar Galactica” is coming back — again — this time to the big screen with Michael De Luca (“Fifty Shades of Grey”) and Scott Stuber as producers, along with Dylan Clark of Bluegrass Films. The Universal film, based on the iconic 1970s sci-fi series and 2003 revival, is in the early stages of development but has yet to find a writer. Created by Glen A. Larson, the first “Battlestar Galactica” series premiered in 1978 and starred Lorne Greene and Richard Hatch, focusing on a group of humans’ bloody war against a cybernetic race known as the Cylons while searching for Earth. Also Read: Danny McBride
See full article at The Wrap »

'Battlestar Galactica' Movie Is Back on Track with New Producers

  • MovieWeb
'Battlestar Galactica' Movie Is Back on Track with New Producers
Way back in 2009, Universal Pictures announced plans to bring Battlestar Galactica back to the big screen, following the success of Ronald D. Moore's hit Syfy series which ended its run that year. Over the years, Bryan Singer was attached to direct at one point, although be parted ways with the project in 2014. Today we have word from The Hollywood Reporter that the studio is taking another crack at the big-screen project, with producers Michael De Luca, Scott Stuber and Dylan Clark boarding the project.

We last reported on the Battlestar Galactica movie back in 2014, when Transcendence writer Jack Paglen was brought on to work on the script. Back in 2011, John Orloff (Anonymous) signed on to write the script, which was said, at the time, to be based on the original 1978 Battlestar Galactica TV series, and not the 2003 Battlestar Galactica remake series. The project doesn't currently have any writers attached,
See full article at MovieWeb »

‘Battlestar Galactica’ Movie Adds Michael De Luca, Scott Stuber as Producers

‘Battlestar Galactica’ Movie Adds Michael De Luca, Scott Stuber as Producers
Universal has brought on “Fifty Shades of Grey” producer Michael De Luca along with Dylan Clark and Scott Stuber for its movie version of the sci-fi franchise “Battlestar Galactica.”

De Luca finalized a three-year first-look deal to produce movies for Universal Pictures last year and is producing the next two “Fifty Shades of Grey” films. Stuber and Clark operate through Bluegrass Films, based at Universal.

Variety reported in April 2014 that original series creator Glen Larson was on board to produce the “Battlestar Galactica” film at Universal with “Transcendence” writer Jack Paglen on board. Larson died later that year.

There have been four “Galactica” TV series (including the brief “Galactica 1980” and “Caprica”). The first, starring Lorne Greene and Richard Hatch, ran during the 1978-79 season and was centered on humans engaged in a lengthy war against a cybernetic race known as the Cylons while searching for Earth.

In 2003, a reimagined
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Top Screenwriting Team from the Golden Age of Hollywood: List of Movies and Academy Award nominations

Billy Wilder directed Sunset Blvd. with Gloria Swanson and William Holden. Billy Wilder and Charles Brackett movies Below is a list of movies on which Charles Brackett and Billy Wilder worked together as screenwriters, including efforts for which they did not receive screen credit. The Wilder-Brackett screenwriting partnership lasted from 1938 to 1949. During that time, they shared two Academy Awards for their work on The Lost Weekend (1945) and, with D.M. Marshman Jr., Sunset Blvd. (1950). More detailed information further below. Post-split years Billy Wilder would later join forces with screenwriter I.A.L. Diamond in movies such as the classic comedy Some Like It Hot (1959), the Best Picture Oscar winner The Apartment (1960), and One Two Three (1961), notable as James Cagney's last film (until a brief comeback in Milos Forman's Ragtime two decades later). Although some of these movies were quite well received, Wilder's later efforts – which also included The Seven Year Itch
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Trends in 70's Cinema: Disaster Movies

  • Cinelinx
Let’s face it, most of us have a soft spot for things blowing up in movies, and for a long time movies have been happy to feed our appetite for destruction. But it wasn’t always that way.

I know it’s hard to imagine, but there was a time when explosions weren’t so common in movies. Back then, big-budget movies had dancing and singing, and everyone had a merry time. After WWII though, things started to change. In newspapers and magazines, Americans were being exposed to terrible images of war-torn Europe and Japan. This imagery was haunting, yet it sparked some imaginations. At first, Hollywood was careful not to glamorize it. They figured out a way to show massive destruction and violence while making it fun and moderately profitable instead of soul-crushing and distasteful. The 50’s became known for its low-budget cheese-fests; sci-fi B movies featuring such
See full article at Cinelinx »

Oscar-Nominated Film Series: First 'Pirates of the Caribbean' One of Most Enjoyable Summer Blockbusters of Early 21st Century

'Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl': Johnny Depp as Capt. Jack Sparrow. 'Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl' review: Mostly an enjoyable romp (Oscar Movie Series) Pirate movies were a Hollywood staple for about three decades, from the mid-'20s (The Sea Hawk, The Black Pirate) to the mid-to-late '50s (Moonfleet, The Buccaneer), when the genre, by then mostly relegated to B films, began to die down. Sporadic resurrections in the '80s and '90s turned out to be critical and commercial bombs (Pirates, Cutthroat Island), something that didn't bode well for the Walt Disney Company's $140 million-budgeted film "adaptation" of one of their theme-park rides. But Neptune's mood has apparently improved with the arrival of the new century. He smiled – grinned would be a more appropriate word – on the Gore Verbinski-directed Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Do audiences want quality movies? L.A. Earthquake Flick to Pass Domestic $100M Mark Today

'San Andreas' movie with Dwayne Johnson. 'San Andreas' movie box office: $100 million domestic milestone today As the old saying (sort of) goes: If you build it, they will come. Warner Bros. built a gigantic video game, called it San Andreas, and They have come to check out Dwayne Johnson perform miraculous deeds not seen since ... George Miller's Mad Max: Fury Road, released two weeks earlier. Embraced by moviegoers, hungry for quality, original storylines and well-delineated characters – and with the assistance of 3D surcharges – the San Andreas movie debuted with $54.58 million from 3,777 theaters on its first weekend out (May 29-31) in North America. Down a perfectly acceptable 52 percent on its second weekend (June 5-7), the special effects-laden actioner collected an extra $25.83 million, trailing only the Melissa McCarthy-Jason Statham comedy Spy, (with $29.08 million) as found at Box Office Mojo.* And that's how this original movie – it's not officially a remake,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

'Blackhat', 'Mortdecai' & 'Still Alice' Lead This Week's New DVD & Blu-ray Releases

Blackhat What an ugly week for new DVD and Blu-ray releases. It's hard to even take it seriously, but at the top of the heap (only because it's the first one I'm writing about) is Michael Mann's supremely disappointing Blackhat. Some people attempted to make excuses for this attempted mess of a cyber thriller, but if you're interested in my take, click here.

Mortdecai I skipped this one and I feel no shame in doing so. In fact, that's all I'm going to say about it.

Still Alice Okay, now this isn't a bad film, I guess I just get frustrated every time I see it mentioned because Julianne Moore did not deliver the best female performance last year and yet, here we are, Oscar winner Julianne Mooore... because "it was her time".

The Cobbler I could have sworn this had already been released, but I guess I was wrong.
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

Memorable Highlights From The 2015 TCM Film Festival

For the sixth consecutive year, thousands of movie lovers from around the globe descended upon Hollywood for the TCM Classic Film Festival. The 2015 festival took take place Thursday, March 26 – Sunday, March 29, 2015 and no matter your favorite genre, attendees were treated to an extensive lineup of great movies, appearances by legendary stars and filmmakers, fascinating presentations and panel discussions, special events and more.

Friday night’s screening of Apollo 13 was definitely one of the most exciting events of the festival. Celebrating its 20th anniversary, Ron Howard’s impressive telling of the nearly doomed mission of the 3 astronauts aboard Apollo 13 looked as spectacular as the first time audiences saw it 20 years ago.

Host and long-time Nasa enthusiast Alex Trebek was on hand to introduce the film, as well as introduce fans in attendance to the real Captain Jim Lovell (played in the film by Tom Hanks). Also joining them on
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Dwayne Johnson Stars in First San Andreas Trailer

Warner Bros. Pictures has released the brand new trailer for next summer’s disaster-suspense film San Andreas.

The film stars Dwayne Johnson, Carla Gugino, Alexandra Daddario, Ioan Gruffudd, Archie Panjabi, Hugo Johnstone-Burt, Art Parkinson and Paul Giamatti.

Shot on location in The Gold Coast and Brisbane, Queensland, Australia, and in Los Angeles and San Francisco, San Andreas is slated to open in theatres in both 3D and 2D format on Friday, May 29, 2015.

This isn’t the first film where Southern California has been destroyed on the silver screen. San Francisco (1936) is based on the April 18, 1906 San Francisco earthquake. Directed by Woody Van Dyke, the drama stars Clark Gable, Jeanette MacDonald, and Spencer Tracy.

Airport originated the 1970s disaster film genre and audiences were deluged with a series of movies including the original Earthquake (1974). These films always included a huge cast, where many of the actors usually perished by the climax.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Top 5: Iconic TV shows of the 1970s

Legendary TV producer and writer Glen A. Larson sadly passed away recently aged 77 – Larson was most famous for creating Battlestar Galactica one of the most spectacular and ambitious television programmes ever produced in the 1970s. And with Battlestar Galactica: The Complete Original Series being released on Blu-ray for the first time last month we’re remembering some of the most iconic TV shows of the 1970s.

Happy Days

Created by Garry Marshall, the series presents an idealised view of Us life in the 1960s and was one of the highest-rated Us TV shows in the 1970s. ‘The Fonz’: Early episodes of the Happy Days revolve around Richie Cunningham (Ron Howard) and his friends but high school dropout and ladies man Arthur ‘The Fonz’ Fonzarelli (Henry Winkler) proved a favourite with viewers so more story lines were written to reflect this popularity. Fun Facts! Robin Williams appeared in the
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Battlestar Galactica: The Definitive Collection & The Remastered Collection Blu-ray Release Details & Cover Art

  • DailyDead
Sandwiched between Star Wars and Star Trek: The Motion Picture in the heyday of late 1970’s sci-fi entertainment was Battlestar Galactica. The show pitted Cylons against the crew of the Galactica for 24 episodes before being followed by Galactica 1980, and fans of the franchise should be pleased to hear that Universal is releasing both series on two separate Blu-ray releases—each with a bunch of bonus features:

(Press release via TVShowsOnDVD.com.) “Universal City, Calif., Nov. 24, 2014 – From renowned writer/producer Glen A. Larson, the creative force behind Knight Rider, The Six Million Dollar Man, and Buck Rogers in the 25th Century, comes the groundbreaking TV series that launched one of the most beloved sci-fi franchises in history, now available in widescreen and high definition as both Battlestar Galactica: The Definitive Collection and Battlestar Galactica: The Remastered Collection come to Blu-ray on May 12, 2015 from Universal Pictures Home Entertainment.
See full article at DailyDead »

Glen A. Larson: 8 Outlandish Projects From the Creator of ‘Knight Rider,’ ‘Battlestar Galactica’

Glen A. Larson: 8 Outlandish Projects From the Creator of ‘Knight Rider,’ ‘Battlestar Galactica’
In his prime, Glen A. Larson could have sold a pilot for ice to the Eskimo Network.

The prolific producer, who died Friday at the age of 77, was not afraid of stretching the limits of physics and credulity in the pursuit of a hit series. He gave us K.I.T.T., the talking supercomputer car of “Knight Rider.” He gave us Steve Austin, the astronaut whose creaky atomic-powered implants gave him superhuman strength. He put Lorne Greene in a track suit and cape to lead “Battlestar Galactica.” And he sicced a mild-mannered Nyu professor who turns into fierce animals on NBC with “Manimal.”

But even with a track record of success that also included “Quincy,” “Magnum, P.I.,” “The Fall Guy” and, yes, “B.J. and the Bear,” Larson had plenty of ones that got away. Culled from the pages of Variety, here’s a look at a few Larson pilots
See full article at Variety - TV News »

David G.B. Brown, ‘Scarecrow and Mrs. King’ Writer, Dies at 67

David G.B. Brown, ‘Scarecrow and Mrs. King’ Writer, Dies at 67
David G.B. Brown, a TV writer who wrote episodes of “Scarecrow and Mrs. King,” as well as “Hunter,” “Max Headroom” and “Lovejoy,” died September 6. He was 67.

Brown penned seven episodes of the CBS spy dramedy “Scarecrow and Mrs. King,” which starred Kate Jackson and Bruce Boxleitner.

His first screen credit was for writing an episode of “Alice” spinoff “Flo” in 1981.

He was also story editor and wrote seven of the 11 episodes of “Code Red,” a fire department-themed show that starred Lorne Greene and Andrew Stevens and ran briefly in 1981-82.

Brown also penned an episode of “Tales of the Golden Monkey” in 1983.
See full article at Variety - TV News »
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