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Diary of an Awards Season Host: Behind the Scenes at the Wild and Powerful 2018 New York Film Critics Circle Awards

Diary of an Awards Season Host: Behind the Scenes at the Wild and Powerful 2018 New York Film Critics Circle Awards
Awards season has become a cluttered and homogenized series of celebrations in which it’s difficult to distinguish one flashy ceremony from the next. And this year, as chair of the New York Film Critics Circle, I became part of the machinery.

With winners announced in December, I spent the last month huddling with our group’s general manager, Marshall Fine, to nail down presenters, coordinate talent schedules, and juggle practical challenges in advance of the January 3 dinner event at Tao Downtown. But even with last-minute cancellations and an ever-changing seating chart, the East Coast’s first major awards event of 2018 was a lot more boisterous, carefree, and fun than our more tightly scripted (and televised) counterparts.

See More: New York Film Critics Circle Leans Into A24’s ‘Lady Bird’ and ‘The Florida Project

In between duties as the evening’s host, I got to witness an incredible mélange of
See full article at Indiewire »

Dan Talbot, In Memoriam: Exploring His Incalculable Legacy

  • Indiewire
Dan Talbot, In Memoriam: Exploring His Incalculable Legacy
Daniel Talbot, a distributor and exhibitor of enormous influence over specialized exhibition and distribution as well as the international film world, died Friday in Manhattan. He was 91. A memorial was held Sunday, December 31 at the Riverside Memorial Chapel with a capacity audience including many leading New York specialized players. Talbot’s wife and business partner, Toby Talbot, as well as daughters Nina, Emily and Sara attended the memorial, where the family spoke fondly about Talbot’s love for the comedian W.C. Fields.

Another more public post-holiday event marking the closing of the Lincoln Plaza Cinemas is scheduled on January 28 in New York. The last few weeks have seen Talbot’s legacy celebrated with reaction to the unexpected announcement that the six-screen Upper West Side theater would close at the end of January, at the expiration of its lease. Milstein Properties, who have been the Talbots’ co-partners in the theater since
See full article at Indiewire »

Review: "Father Goose" (1964) Starring Cary Grant And Leslie Caron; Olive Films Blu-ray Special Edition

  • CinemaRetro
By Lee Pfeiffer

Cary Grant was one of the few actors to defy the effects of aging. The older he got, the more popular his films became. By the late 1950s Grant had become uncomfortable making movies because he realized audiences only wanted to see him as a romantic lead and he felt self-conscious about studio insistence that he be seen on screen romancing female leads who were often decades younger than him. Nonetheless, Grant kept forestalling his frequent vows to retire from acting. He had taken much more control over his career by forming his own production company and the result were some of the biggest hits of his career ("Operation Petticoat", "That Touch of Mink", "Charade"). Grant's primary motivation for not retiring was his desire- or rather, obsession- with winning an Oscar. Alfred Hitchcock had advised him that the best way to do so was to get away
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Four Faces West

Westerns are all about values: good and bad, law and lawlessness, etc. Joel McCrea and Frances Dee’s ‘bad man’ saga isn’t faith based, exactly, but it’s great for humanitarian values, the simple notion that the good in people should be encouraged. And one important detail may make it unique. Hint: John Milius might be strongly prejudiced against this picture.

Four Faces West

Blu-ray

Kl Studio Classics

1948 / B&W / 1:37 flat Academy / 89 min. / Street Date December 19, 2017 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95

Starring: Joel McCrea, Frances Dee, Charles Bickford, Joseph Calleia, William Conrad.

Cinematography: Russell Harlan

Film Editor: Edward Mann

Original Music: Paul Sawtell

Written by C. Graham Baker, Teddi Sherman, William & Milarde Brent from the novel Pasó por aquí by Eugene Manlove Rhodes

Produced by Vernon E. Clark, Harry Sherman

Directed by Alfred E. Green

Faith-based westerns exist, but much more numerous are lightly inspirational sagebrush pictures that deal
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Sliff 2017 Review – The Hippopotamus

The Hippopotamus screens as part of the 26th Annual Whitaker St. Louis International Film Festival on Sunday, November 5 at 1 Pm at Landmark’s Tivoli Theatre. Click Here for ticket information. It also screens there on Sunday, November 12 at 9:15 Pm. Click Here for ticket information for that day.

From across the pond comes a pitch black comedy set amongst the veddy, veddy upper classes. Proving that Larry David doesn’t have a monopoly in the Us as an ill-tempered cranky curmudgeon, celebrated actor/ writer Stephen Fry gives us a most unlikely screen hero, middle-aged failed poet, reviled theatre critic, and “boozehound” Ted Wallace. He’s played with swaggering bravado by Roger Allam, an actor known for his deep baritone, who has amassed a long list of supporting roles (The Queen, The Book Thief) and now proves that he’s more than ready for a leading role. After being canned from
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Film Review: ‘Wait for Your Laugh’

Film Review: ‘Wait for Your Laugh’
The recent death of fabled French star Danielle Darrieux at age 100 prompted speculation that she might have sustained the longest career in showbiz. However, still-alive-and-kicking Rose Marie has the edge — though retired (most reluctantly) at a mere 94 years, she started nine full decades earlier, racking up a career that encompassed practically every popular performance medium in the U.S. As lively and likable as its subject, Jason Wise’s documentary “Wait for Your Laugh” pays fond tribute to a tireless trooper whom generations have known mostly as a wisecracking second banana often funnier than the bigger stars she supported. It should draw out patrons “of a certain age” who likely haven’t journeyed to the multiplex for some while.

Wheelchair-bound now, Rose Marie’s mind remains sharp as a tack, and she happily walks us through one hell of a professional resume. Born Rose Marie Mazetta in 1923 Manhattan, she was taken to shows from an early age by
See full article at Variety - Film News »

How Much Shock Can You Stand?

Ghosts are famous for their flexibility, spiraling through keyholes and up from the floorboards in search of their next mark. But movies about ghosts can be flexible too. Three classics of the genre, The Uninvited, House on Haunted Hill and The Innocents, demonstrate that there’s more than one way haunt a house.

These films never appeared on any triple bill that I know of, but I’d like to think they did, somewhere in some small town with a theater manager that knew a good scare when he saw it. How could the programmer resist it? Each film is united by a beautiful black and white sheen, eerie locales and their ability to scare the bejeezus out of you. But they’re also alike in their differences, coming at their specters from distinctly different vantage points.

1944’s The Uninvited, a three-hankie haunted house tale with a dysfunctional family subplot,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Frederick Wiseman on ‘Ex Libris,’ the Democracy of Libraries, and Why His Films Would Never Work as a TV Series

The Stephen A. Schwarzman Building, also known as the “Main Branch” of the New York Public Library, is located at 42nd Street and 5th Avenue, next to Bryant Park. Almost 150 years ago that was the setting of the Murray Hill Reservoir, which supplied drinking water for most of the city through the end of the 19th century. It’s perhaps no coincide that the Nypl’s headquarters are located there, since they have taken on the duty of supplying the city with knowledge and culture, elements which are as essential to New Yorkers as water. The iconic building is at the center of Frederick Wiseman’s Ex Libris, an enthralling documentary that chronicles the work the Nypl continues to do since its inception in 1911.

Wiseman’s enlightening, often quite moving film, explores the Nypl’s reach beyond 42nd Street, through its almost 90 branches, which provide courses, talks and, of course,
See full article at The Film Stage »

'Tomorrow and Thereafter' ('Demain et tous les autres jours'): Film Review | Locarno 2017

'Tomorrow and Thereafter' ('Demain et tous les autres jours'): Film Review | Locarno 2017
Happily disobeying W.C. Fields' counsel against working with children and animals, writer-director-performer Noemie Lvovsky gamely lets herself be doubly upstaged in her sixth directorial outing, Tomorrow and Thereafter (Demain et tous les autres jours). A mildly fantastical tale of an eccentric mother, her precocious 8-year-old daughter and the latter's sagacious pet owl, this is a sensitively rendered slice of therapeutic autobiography for Lvovsky, one of France's most popular thespians. A crowd-pleaser with a gently melancholy undertow, the Locarno opener is likely to share the fortunes of her five previous directorial outings, scoring decent returns at home...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

The Truth About Zardoz, Plus Nine Other Things I Learned At Tcmff 2017

Just back from the 2017 TCM Classic Movie Festival with a few thoughts and thoughts about thoughts. I certainly held my reservations about this year’s edition, and though I ultimately ended up tiring early of flitting about from theater to theater like a mouse in a movie maze (it happens to even the most fanatically devoted of us on occasion, or so I’m told), there were, as always, several things I learned by attending Tcmff 2017 as well.

1) TCM Staffers Are Unfailingly Polite And Helpful

Thankfully I wasn’t witness, as I have been in past years, to any pass holders acting like spoiled children because they had to wait in a long queue or, heaven forbid, because they somehow didn’t get in to one of their preferred screenings. Part of what makes the Tcmff experience as pleasant as it often is can be credited to the tireless work
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

A Tcmff 2017 Preamble

“It’s the most wonderful time/Of the year…” – Andy Williams

Well, yes and no. There is, after all, still about a week and a half to go before we can put the long national, annual nightmare of the tax season behind us. But it’s also film festival season, which for me specifically means the onset of the 2017 TCM Classic Film Festival, the eighth iteration of what has become a perennial moviegoing event. More and more people flock to Hollywood Boulevard each year from all reaches of the country, and from other countries, to revel in the history of Hollywood and international filmmaking, celebrate their favorite stars (including, this year, beloved TCM host Robert Osborne, who died earlier this year and whose presence has been missed at the festival for the past two sessions) and enjoy a long-weekend-sized bout of nostalgia for the movie culture being referred to when
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Jean Rouverol Butler, Blacklisted Screenwriter, Dies at 100

  • The Wrap
Jean Rouverol Butler, Blacklisted Screenwriter, Dies at 100
Jean Rouverol Butler, an actress turned screenwriter who was blacklisted by Sen. Joseph McCarthy in the 1950s and fled to Mexico with her husband, died Friday at the age of 100, according to a funeral notice posted by her family. Rouverol Butler’s introduction to showbiz came at an early age. Her mother, playwright Aurania (Ellerbeck) Rouverol, was the creator of Andy Hardy and many films for MGM. At 17, the young Rouverol was discovered in true Hollywood style while in a high school production. Her first professional acting role was as W.C. Fields’ daughter in “It’s a Gift” (1934), and...
See full article at The Wrap »

Jean Rouverol, Blacklisted Screenwriter, Dies at 100

Jean Rouverol, Blacklisted Screenwriter, Dies at 100
Jean Rouverol, who played W.C. Fields' daughter in It's a Gift and then became a screenwriter who was blacklisted in Hollywood and driven with her husband to self-exile in Mexico, has died. She was 100.

Rouverol died Friday at a nursing home in Wingdale, N.Y., Rick Lertzman, co-author of the 2015 book The Life and Times of Mickey Rooney, told The Hollywood Reporter.

In recent years, Rouverol had been living with actor Cliff Carpenter, who also had been blacklisted, in Pawling, N.Y. He died in 2014 at age 98.

...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Jean Rouverol, Blacklisted Screenwriter, Dies at 100

Jean Rouverol, who played W.C. Fields' daughter in It's a Gift and then became a screenwriter who was blacklisted in Hollywood and driven with her husband to self-exile in Mexico, has died. She was 100.

Rouverol died Friday at the home of her caregiver in Wingdale, N.Y., Rick Lertzman, co-author of the 2015 book The Life and Times of Mickey Rooney, told The Hollywood Reporter.

In recent years, Rouverol had been living with actor Cliff Carpenter, who also had been blacklisted, in Pawling, N.Y. He died in 2014 at age 98.

...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - TV News »

Wilson – Review

This week sees another comic book adaptation arrive at movie theatres, while the Lego Batman and Logan are still pulling audiences in at the multiplex. Ah, but this film is not another superhero slugfest (we’ll have three more of those from Marvel Studios, and two from Warner/DC by the year’s end). No this comes from the “upper classes” of illustrated narratives, those “serious and somber” graphic novels (kind of a “highfalutin'” moniker). Several prestige flicks have been based on such books, like The History Of Violence and The Road To Perdition (both earned Oscar noms). The “graphic artist” (hey, I’ll bet he’d prefer cartoonist) behind this new film is no stranger to cinema. Matter of fact, this is his third feature-length movie adaptation. The first was my personal favorite flick of 2001, the quirky Ghost World (no ectoplasmic apparitions, but a teenage Scarlett Johansson). Five years
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Three Classic Films Screening at The Tivoli March 7th – 9th

My Little Chickadee, White Heat, and Raging Bull constitute the three-film series sponsored by The Mildred Kemper Art Museum next week at The Tivoli Theater (6350 Delmar in the University City Loop). This ties into the museum’s current exhibit “Rosalyn Drexler: Who Does She Think She Is?” These are Free screenings!

A kiss. A punch. A body braced for impact. The paintings of Rosalyn Drexler exude uncanny stillness, anticipation and, frequently, the dread of imminent violence. Moments of intimacy and conflict are frozen, sliced and readied for examination — excerpts from narratives whose conclusions can only be guessed. From Feb. 10 to April 17, the Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum at Washington University in St. Louis will present “Rosalyn Drexler: Who Does She Think She Is?”, the first full-career retrospective for the multi-talented artist. Surveying six decades of work, the exhibition features major paintings and collages alongside rarely seen early sculptures.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Cats on Camera: How to Shoot Feral Felines and Make Them Into Stars, According to the Director of ‘Kedi’

Cats on Camera: How to Shoot Feral Felines and Make Them Into Stars, According to the Director of ‘Kedi’
Plenty of directors have gleefully disregarded W.C. Fields’ old movie adage – “never work with children or animals” – but documentary filmmaker Ceyda Torun all but tossed it out the window when it came time to make her feature debut. With “Kedi,” Torun is all about the animals, specifically an adorable series of Turkish street cats that happily make their homes on the streets of Istanbul. The result is a wonderfully unique and deeply charming look at feral felines and the many humans who love and care for them, all told from a distinctly cat’s eye view.

For the Turkish filmmaker, the indelible cats that roam the various neighborhoods that make up her hometown are more than just subjects, they are cherished friends, and the film finds its true heart when it illuminates the special bonds between the cats and the people who endeavor to make their lives better though food,
See full article at Indiewire »

A Dog’S Purpose – Review

Excuse the pun, but Hollywood has gone to the dogs. And it’s not the first time. Man’s (and the movies’) best friend has been the hero and heroine of many a flick since the old nickleodeon days. The first canine superstar was probably Rin-Tin-tin way back in the silent era. He was a German Shepherd who rescued human co-stars and even a soon to be major studio (the Warner Brothers might not have survived without his box office bucks). Then came Lassie in her many media incarnations, along with other dogs that provided comic relief from Nick and Nora’s terrier Asta to that Saint Bernard behemoth, Beethoven. With the advent of social media there’s been an avalanche of pet adoration, with funny home videos of dogs taking a big bite out of the bandwidth. This helped fuel last summer’s animated smash The Secret Life Of Pets (primarily dogs,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Why the Band's 'The Last Waltz' Is the Greatest Concert Movie of All Time

Why the Band's 'The Last Waltz' Is the Greatest Concert Movie of All Time
"This film should be played loud!" It's a cliché now, a concert-movie disclaimer that's become the equivalent of that hippie-dippy tagline from those Freedom Rock compilation ads ("Well, turn it up, maaaaan.") But in the late Seventies, when it first flashed onscreen in all white font against a stark black background before the credits of The Last Waltz, you knew it meant business. Keep moving that volume knob clockwise, folks. Let the needle swing into the red.

And then we begin at the end, with the weary members of the
See full article at Rolling Stone »

The Chase

Horton Foote, Lillian Hellman and Arthur Penn's All-Star vision of an Ugly America found few friends in 1965; now its overstated scenes of social injustice and violence are daily events. Marlon Brando leads a terrific cast -- Robert Redford, Jane Fonda, Angie Dickinson, Robert Duvall! -- to endure the worst Saturday ever to hit one cursed Texas township. The Chase (1966) Blu-ray Twilight Time 1966 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 134 min. / Street Date October 11, 2016 / Available from the Twilight Time Movies Store / 29.95 Starring Marlon Brando, Jane Fonda, Robert Redford, E.G. Marshall, Angie Dickinson, Janice Rule, Miriam Hopkins, Martha Hyer, Richard Bradford, Robert Duvall, James Fox, Diana Hyland, Henry Hull, Jocelyn Brando, Clifton James, Steve Ihnat Cinematography Joseph Lashelle Production Designer Richard Day Art Direction Robert Luthardt Film Editor Gene Milford Original Music John Barry Written by Lillian Hellman from the novel by Horton Foote Produced by Sam Spiegel Directed by Arthur Penn

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson
See full article at Trailers from Hell »
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