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Songs for Screens: Country Superstar Songwriter Natalie Hemby Steps Out; Sia Brings Holiday Cheer to JCPenney

Songs for Screens: Country Superstar Songwriter Natalie Hemby Steps Out; Sia Brings Holiday Cheer to JCPenney
“Songs for Screens” (formerly known as “Synch This”) is a Variety column written by Andrew Hampp, a VP at New York-based music sponsorship and experiential agency Mac Presents and former branding correspondent for Billboard. Each week, the column will highlight noteworthy use of music in advertising and marketing campaigns, as well as new and catalog songs that we deem ripe for synch use.

Natalie Hemby has written for many of country music’s biggest stars – including hits for Little Big Town, Lady Antebellum, and Miranda Lambert’s 2015 Acm Song of the Year award-winning “Automatic.” But for her long-awaited solo-artist debut “Puxico,” which is already ranking high on 2017 year-end lists, Hemby took a low-key approach.

The project began as the score to a documentary Hemby created on the album’s titular town, a tribute to her grandparents’ hometown in Southeast Missouri. After showcasing the film in Nashville, Hemby hadn’t intended for “Puxico” to have a life of
See full article at Variety - Film News »

The Hazy Romanticism of ‘I’m Not There’

Looking back on this still-young century makes clear that 2007 was a major time for cinematic happenings — and, on the basis of this retrospective, one we’re not quite through with ten years on. One’s mind might quickly flash to a few big titles that will be represented, but it is the plurality of both festival and theatrical premieres that truly surprises: late works from old masters, debuts from filmmakers who’ve since become some of our most-respected artists, and mid-career turning points that didn’t necessarily announce themselves as such at the time. Join us as an assembled team, many of whom were coming of age that year, takes on their favorites.

A kaleidoscopic portrait / exploration / celebration / etc. of Bob Dylan’s many contradictions and personas, I’m Not There isn’t the first pseudo-biopic from director Todd Haynes. His debut film, Superstar, unravels the life of singer Karen Carpenter and her eventual,
See full article at The Film Stage »

Benicio Del Toro's DJ Emerges from the Shadows of The Last Jedi

Benicio Del Toro's DJ Emerges from the Shadows of The Last Jedi
With exactly two weeks left until Star Wars: The Last Jedi hits theaters, a new photo of the enigmatic character DJ, played by Benicio del Toro, has emerged, along with new details from the actor himself. There is very little we know about this character up until now, except that he is an expert "slicer," the Star Wars universe term for a computer hacker, and that he is sought out by Finn (John Boyega) and Rose Tico (Kelly Marie Tran) on their mission to the casino planet of Canto Bight. Empire Magazine revealed a new photo of DJ, with the actor offering some new details about this character, who is not to be trusted.

"This character could come straight out of a Bob Dylan or Tom Waites song, or even a Dostoyevsky novel. He's like something out of Dickens; there have been characters like him in all kinds of literature.
See full article at MovieWeb »

New image of Benicio Del Toro’s DJ from Star Wars: The Last Jedi

One of the many questions surrounding Star Wars: The Last Jedi is the role that Benicio Del Toro’s DJ will play in the film. Aside from his name, and that he’s a “slicer” (a.k.a. hacker), we know little else about the mysterious character, or his allegiances. We do however have a brand new image of him, while Del Toro has shared a few comments on his role during an interview with Empire Online.

“This character could come straight out of a Bob Dylan or Tom Waites song, or even a Dostoyevsky novel,” said Del Toro. “He’s like something out of Dickens; there have been characters like him in all kinds of literature. He’s like a knife: if you grab him by the blade, he’ll cut you. If you grab him by the handle, he can be very, very useful.”

How do you think
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

‘Wonderstruck’ Dp Ed Lachman: “I Always Feel Like A Cinematographer Is Another Actor” – The Contenders Video

‘Wonderstruck’ Dp Ed Lachman: “I Always Feel Like A Cinematographer Is Another Actor” – The Contenders Video
Since they first collaborated on 2002's Far From Heaven, Ed Lachman has been an integral part of Todd Haynes' core team, serving as cinematographer on films as complex as the director's experimental 2007 Bob Dylan biography I'm Not There or as straightforward as 2015's Patricia Highsmith adaptation Carol. "He always puts me in places I don’t want to be," Lachman told me during Deadline’s The Contenders event this month in front of an Sro crowd of Academy and guild voters…
See full article at Deadline »

The Last Jedi: Benicio Del Toro Dishes On DJ As New Action Shot Surfaces

Vice Admiral Holdo, Rose Tico, and DJ are undoubtedly the three buzzworthy newcomers to Star Wars: The Last Jedi‘s human cast. But whereas Holdo and Tico fight on behalf of the Resistance, it’s difficult to know exactly where Benicio Del Toro’s hacker stands in the imminent sequel.

Back when the actor first climbed on board, his underworld drifter became associated with the word ‘villain,’ but it turns out DJ actually operates between good and evil – between the light and the dark. Granted, Del Toro’s character is still riddled with mystery and head-scratching ambiguity, but thanks to Empire Magazine, we now have some new intel (along with a high-res action shot!) pertaining to Benicio Del Toro’s newcomer. And, well, let’s just say it’s better to stay in his good books.

This character could come straight out of a Bob Dylan or Tom Waites song,
See full article at We Got This Covered »

Post Malone Says He Was Not Dissing Hip-Hop

  • TMZ
[[tmz:video id="0_46qcned2"]] Post Malone says he'd been drinking a ton of beer when he said people shouldn't listen to hip-hop if they want to feel something. Post has taken a ration of crap for the comment he made during an interview in Poland.  He's now walking it back, saying his personal preference when he wants to feel something or cry is not hi- hop ... it's Bob Dylan.  The rapper says the criticism is misplaced because he's rooted in hip-hop.
See full article at TMZ »

AC/DC Guitarist Malcolm Young Passes Away at 64

AC/DC Guitarist Malcolm Young Passes Away at 64
For those about to rock, we salute you. Malcolm Young, founding member of AC/DC and brother to lead guitarist Angus Young, has passed away at the age of 64. Malcolm suffered through dementia and cancer for the last years of his life and has not toured or recorded with the band since 2008's Black Ice. Malcolm Young was the band's rhythm guitar player and is responsible for many of AC/DC's best-known songs that have topped the charts as well as helped launch movies into the top of the box office with his contributions to soundtracks.

In a statement on the Malcolm Young's Facebook, his family said, "Renowned for his musical prowess, Malcolm was a songwriter, guitarist, performer, producer and visionary who inspired many." While the statement is accurate, it also underscores just how amazing Malcolm Young really was. Arnold Schwarzenegger's The Last Action Hero was a box office bomb,
See full article at MovieWeb »

Benicio Del Toro Says Star Wars: The Last Jedi’s DJ Character Is Neither Hero Nor Villain

Vice Admiral Amilyn Holdo, Rose and DJ – the three buzzworthy human additions to the cast of Star Wars: The Last Jedi.

The first two hail from the ranks of the Resistance, and will be played by Laura Dern and Kelly Marie Tran. But it’s Benicio Del Toro’s roguish DJ character who has sparked the most debate among the Star Wars community.

Described as an “enigmatic figure whose tattered, threadbare clothes and lackadaisical attitude conceal a sharp mind and expert skills,” DJ has already drawn comparisons to the great Han Solo for his sense of swagger. However, Del Toro himself has offered up some new intel relating to his character in The Last Jedi, and it seems he’s neither a hero, nor a villain – meaning he doesn’t exactly side with the Resistance or the First Order.

SciFi Now (via Screen Rant) caught up with the Oscar-winner to
See full article at We Got This Covered »

The Last Word: Michael Moore on Trump, Springsteen and Where We're Headed

The Last Word: Michael Moore on Trump, Springsteen and Where We're Headed
Illustration by Mark Summers for Rolling Stone

On July 21st, 2016 – at a time when nearly every political pundit and member of the mainstream media thought that Donald Trump didn't have even a chance of beating Hillary ClintonMichael Moore went public with his belief that the Republican candidate was going to win. "You are living in a bubble that comes with an adjoining echo chamber where you and your friends are convinced the American people are not going to elect an idiot for president," he wrote in a pleading messages to Americans,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

From Grammys to Bono: 3 Wild Stories from Notorious Gate Crasher Craig Schmell’s New Book

From Grammys to Bono: 3 Wild Stories from Notorious Gate Crasher Craig Schmell’s New Book
Driving in President Reagan’s motorcade and talking with Bono about Irish football — these are some of the crazy things that Craig Schmell got to experience during the peak of his celebrity event crashing days.

Schmell famously spent his 20s scheming his way into some of the biggest celebrity events of the time. In his new book, The Uninvited, he details some of his best crashes and how he ended up turning his cheating ways around.

During his heyday, Schmell got into some serious hijinks, like getting high inside of the Kremlin, but the book dives deeper past the scheming
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

‘Long Strange Trip’ Director: Childhood Trauma Drove Grateful Dead’s Jerry Garcia

‘Long Strange Trip’ Director: Childhood Trauma Drove Grateful Dead’s Jerry Garcia
The music documentary has become a bedrock of the nonfiction form, producing some of its most memorable films: 1967’s Dont Look Back, about Bob Dylan, 1970's Gimme Shelter about the Rolling Stones, and in just the past few years a couple of Oscar winners—20 Feet from Stardom, and Amy, Asif Kapadia's documentary on the late Amy Winehouse. This year, no fewer than 14 music-themed documentaries have qualified for Oscar consideration, including ones on Lady Gaga, Whitney…
See full article at Deadline »

Review: "Festival: Folk Music At Newport 1963-1966" (1967); Criterion Blu-ray Special Edition

  • CinemaRetro
By Hank Reineke

From 1963 through 1966 Murray Lerner would make the yearly trek from New York City to the tony seaside town of Newport, Rhode Island. Once there, the documentarian seemingly photographed every major and minor player of the 1960’s folk music craze for his resulting award-winning film Festival (1967). Depending on one’s personal taste in music, the celluloid snippets offered in the film’s final edit – several capturing folk and blues artists performing in the prime of their careers – are either frustratingly truncated or mercifully brief in length.

As a lifelong folk music enthusiast, I would find this film a treasure even if the film’s “star players” (Bob Dylan, Joan Baez, Peter, Paul & Mary) were not featured. Watching snippets of such legends as Son House or Mississippi John Hurt sing the blues, Tex Logan and the Lilly Bros. sing their brand of high, lonesome bluegrass or Minneapolis’ Spider John
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Rome Film Fest: Michael Shannon on Invoking Bob Dylan in 'Trouble No More'

Rome Film Fest: Michael Shannon on Invoking Bob Dylan in 'Trouble No More'
Trouble No More is a goldmine for Bob Dylan fans. The new documentary from Jennifer Lebeau, which played at Rome Film Fest after its world premiere at New York Film Festival, brings to light lost footage from Dylan’s gospel years, during which he released a trilogy of Christian albums.

Among those hardcore fans is Michael Shannon, who was recruited to perform a series of sermons, written by Luc Sante, that are intercut with the concert footage in the film.

Speaking to press in Rome, Shannon said he has always been a huge fan of the singer, and his very first...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Bob Dylan Gospel-Era Doc To Get One-Night-Only Screening Pre-dvd Release

Bob Dylan Gospel-Era Doc To Get One-Night-Only Screening Pre-dvd Release
Abramorama and Columbia Records/Legacy Recordings will premiere Jennifer Lebeau’s Bob Dylan concert documentary Trouble No More with Landmark Theatres, screening the film for one night only on Thursday, November 2. Trouble No More, which intersperses concert footage from Dylan’s 1980-ear Gospel period with sermons written by Luc Sante and delivered by Michael Shannon, made its bow at this year’s New York Film Festival. Executive produced by White Horse Pictures, the doc…
See full article at Deadline »

Interview, Audio: Director Todd Haynes Becomes ‘Wonderstruck’

Chicago – Todd Haynes is an American auteur, as every one of his films bear the distinct mark of his creativity. From his beginnings with the indie masterpiece “Safe” (1995) through unforgettable films like “Far From Heaven” (2002), “I’m Not There” (2007) and “Carol,” Haynes has made cinematic art. His latest film is “Wonderstruck.”

The film is adapted from a popular young adult novel by Brian Selznick, which was combined with distinct graphic art. Haynes use the art to dreamily interpret the book, as the film is set in the 1920s and 1970s New York City. Jumping from era to era is the catch of the story, as a deaf girl (Millicent Simmonds) from the ‘20s is interconnected to a newly deaf boy (Oakes Fegley) in the 1970s. The film features Julianne Moore in a dual role, and also features Michelle Williams.

Todd Haynes at the Chicago International Film Festival in 2015

Photo credit:
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Bob Dylan Performs ‘Learning To Fly’ In Honour Of Former Traveling Wilburys Bandmate Tom Petty

Bob Dylan paid tribute to the late Tom Petty during a Saturday-night concert in Broomfield, Colorado, by performing Petty’s “Learning to Fly” during the encore, on the night after what would have been Petty’s 67th birthday. The song, from Petty’s first sans-Heartbreakers solo album, “Into the Great Wide Open”, was co-written by Petty and Elo […]
See full article at ET Canada »

Jean-Luc Godard’s Bewitchingly Self-Reflexive Midlife Crisis

Emerging from his politically radical period of low-budget, didactic political commentaries with revolutionary overtones, produced primarily on 16mm or tape for television broadcast, prolific French avant-garde iconoclast Jean-Luc Godard unexpectedly returned to commercial filmmaking with Every Man for Himself, finding reinvention in the age of video — a new formal frontier for the now-middle-aged provocateur. Godard’s star-studded return to more conventional cinemas, featuring Isabelle Huppert, Nathalie Baye, and Jacques Dutronc as Paul Godard (of course), a loathsome filmmaker humiliated by having been reduced to working for a TV studio, though shy of being considered a phenomenon in France or elsewhere, was well-publicized worldwide. Uncharacteristically, the aging filmmaker promoted the film extensively, pensively referring to it as his “second first film,” a somewhat deadpan admission that, to begin again, he had to shed the baggage of his underground period. Through this mainstream amelioration began a self-reflective period of filmmaking, reverse-engineering his formal fascinations — disruptive non-linear editing,
See full article at The Film Stage »

Todd Haynes on ‘Wonderstruck,’ Perceptions of Childhood, and David Bowie

It’s no small testament to Todd Haynes that this is the second interview this website’s conducted with him since August. Although the opening of his newest film, Wonderstruck, is a proper excuse, that’s only ostensibly the occasion; the truth is that we’d gladly go over his decades- and genre-spanning filmography any day of the week and still have plenty of ground to cover.

So it’s doubly to our fortune that Wonderstruck befits multiple rounds of discussion. A children’s adventure movie wrapped in a two-pronged period piece that can hardly conceal the tragedies this kind of work so often doesn’t want you to think about, it finds Haynes and the usual band of collaborators — Dp Ed Lachman, composer Carter Burwell, and costume designer Sandy Powell among them — working on their biggest canvas yet. For recalling the director’s artistic history as much as anything else,
See full article at The Film Stage »

Junior Bonner

Sam Peckinpah was a fine director of actors when the material was right, and his first collaboration with Steve McQueen is an shaded character study about a rodeo family dealing with changing times. Joe Don Baker and Ben Johnson shine, but the movie belongs to Ida Lupino and Robert Preston.

Junior Bonner

Blu-ray

Kl Studio Classics

1972 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 100 min. / Special Edition / Street Date October 31, 2017 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95

Starring: Steve McQueen, Robert Preston, Ida Lupino, Joe Don Baker, Ben Johnson, Mary Murphy, Dub Taylor, Don ‘Red’ Barry, Bill McKinney.

Cinematography: Lucien Ballard

Film Editors: Frank Santillo, Robert L. Wolfe

Second Unit Director: Frank Kowalski

Bud Hurlbud: Special Effects

Original Music: Jerry Fielding

Written by Jeb Rosebrook

Produced by Joe Wizan

Directed by Sam Peckinpah

I suppose there were plenty of successful rodeo-themed westerns back in the day, perhaps the kind interrupted by a cowboy song every ten minutes or so.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »
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