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#Raindance2017: In Another Life, Hello Again, Maya Dardel

Quick takes from the 25th Raindance Film Festival, with public screenings in London through October 1st, 2017.

In Another Life

British filmmaker Jason Wingard went to the Jungle, the refugee camp in Calais, intending to make a documentary about life there. But after befriending those living in squalor out of desperation, he decided to make a narrative based on their stories instead, shot in the Jungle and with some of them playing versions of themselves. The result is an astonishingly moving film that rehumanizes people who have been dehumanized in public discourse, putting faces to the still-ongoing refugee crisis and inescapably reminding us that those we’ve Othered are not very different from us. “In another life,” Syrian refugee Adnan (French actor Elie Haddad) tells us in the touching narration through which we follow his journey, “I was a teacher.” His new friends in the Jungle are other middle-class people from such far-flung places as Sudan,
See full article at FlickFilosopher »

Trailer Watch: A Writer Announces Her Plan to Commit Suicide and Seeks an Heir in “Maya Dardel”

Maya Dardel

Academy Award nominee Lena Olin plays an internationally renowned poet and novelist busy orchestrating one helluva plot twist in her own life in Magdalena Zyzak and Zachary Cotler’s “Maya Dardel.” “My work is in decline. I see no need to birth a few more mediocre books,” says Maya (Olin) in a new trailer for the film. But rather than quietly retire, she’s decided to take a more radical approach to dealing with the issue: she announces on National Public Radio that she plans to kill herself.

Maya explains, “I don’t have any family so I’m going to need an heir and executor. I want young but professional writers of poetry and the guy I pick gets my house, and my archive, and my publishing rights when I’m gone.”

The men vying for the role “are challenged intellectually, emotionally, erotically, until one of them begins to fathom Maya’s end game,” the film’s official synopsis hints.

“You’re never going to kill yourself. You just wanted attention,” one of the wannabe heirs accuses Maya.

Olin received an Oscar nod in 1990 for “Enemies: A Love Story.” The Swedish actress’ other credits include “Alias,” “Chocolat,” and “The Ninth Gate.”

Maya Dardel” marks Zyzak and Cotler’s directorial debuts. The pair also penned the script for the drama, which made its world premiere at SXSW this year. The film opens in NY and La on October 27 with additional cities to follow.

https://medium.com/media/9746eb450aae83f55de161369f47220f/href

Trailer Watch: A Writer Announces Her Plan to Commit Suicide and Seeks an Heir in “Maya Dardel” was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Julia Stiles on ‘Riviera’ and Joining Sundance Now’s Multi-Part Thriller Series

  • Collider.com
The 10-part thriller Riviera, available at Sundance Now (AMC Networks’ premium video streaming service), follows Georgina (Julia Stiles), a high-end art curator who’s newly married to billionaire Constantine Clios (Anthony Lapaglia) and living in the south of France when he’s killed in a yacht explosion. After his death, Georgina discovers that the man she thought she knew and the fortune that he maintained were tainted by dishonesty and criminal activity, and that Constantine’s ex-wife (Lena Olin) and three children (Dimitri Leonidas, Iwan Rheon and Roxane Duran) are more aware about his questionable dealings and …
See full article at Collider.com »

Raindance Unveils Full Lineup, Including Closing Film ‘Stuck’ (Exclusive)

Raindance Unveils Full Lineup, Including Closing Film ‘Stuck’ (Exclusive)
The New York-set musical movie “Stuck” will have its international premiere at the Raindance Film Festival, which announced its full 2017 lineup Thursday. As the London-based festival’s closing film, “Stuck” follows a group of strangers who are stranded on a New York subway train together and who reveal their true selves through song and pop music. Directed by Michael Berry, it stars Giancarlo Esposito (“Okja”) and Oscar nominee Amy Madigan.

This year’s edition of Raindance features 200 films, shorts, Vr projects, and music videos, including Zachary Cotler and Magdalena Zyzak’s feature debut, “Maya Dardel,” starring Lena Olin and Rosanna Arquette; Tony Gatlif’s “Djam”; and Japanese film “Mukoku,” all of which are in competition. Other titles competing for awards include Jason Wingard’s directional debut, “In Another Life,” which is set against the backdrop of the “Jungle” refugee camp in Calais, France, and has its international premiere at Raindance.

Atsuko Hirayanagi
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Fall TV Preview: The 25 Most Anticipated New Shows of 2017

  • Indiewire Television
Fall TV Preview: The 25 Most Anticipated New Shows of 2017
The idea of a “fall TV season” feels particularly antiquated in 2017, as two of the year’s buzziest series (“Game of Thrones” and “Twin Peaks”) have already wrapped for the year. Fall may even be a bit of an afterthought now compared to spring, as networks aim to catch Emmy voters with prestige TV premieres when campaign season gets underway.

And yet, there’s nearly 70 years of tradition with the fall TV season. It’s when Nielsen still resets the calendar for the new TV year; when blue chip advertisers like the automotive sector roll out their own new wares; football season returns (don’t discount that huge impact on TV schedules); and the weather gets chilly, which conceivably means more viewers watching TV indoors.

This year, they’ll find a lot of familiar titles on broadcast TV, including the return of NBC’s “Will & Grace”; a prequel to “The Big Bang Theory,
See full article at Indiewire Television »

Fall TV Preview: The 25 Most Anticipated New Shows of 2017

  • Indiewire
Fall TV Preview: The 25 Most Anticipated New Shows of 2017
The idea of a “fall TV season” feels particularly antiquated in 2017, as two of the year’s buzziest series (“Game of Thrones” and “Twin Peaks”) have already wrapped for the year. Fall may even be a bit of an afterthought now compared to spring, as networks aim to catch Emmy voters with prestige TV premieres when campaign season gets underway.

And yet, there’s nearly 70 years of tradition with the fall TV season. It’s when Nielsen still resets the calendar for the new TV year; when blue chip advertisers like the automotive sector roll out their own new wares; football season returns (don’t discount that huge impact on TV schedules); and the weather gets chilly, which conceivably means more viewers watching TV indoors.

This year, they’ll find a lot of familiar titles on broadcast TV, including the return of NBC’s “Will & Grace”; a prequel to “The Big Bang Theory,
See full article at Indiewire »

Haugesund: Yellow Affair Falls for ‘Maya Dardel’ (Exclusive)

Haugesund: Yellow Affair Falls for ‘Maya Dardel’ (Exclusive)
Scandinavian sales outfit The Yellow Affair has picked up all rights outside North America and South America on the Lena Olin vehicle “Maya Dardel.”

The feature marks the directorial debut of U.S. poet/novelist Zachary Cotler who shares the directing and writing credits with Polish-born but U.S.-based Magdalena Zyzak. The duo just won best screenplay for the film earlier this month at the Prague Independent Film Festival, while Lena Olin (“Chocolat”) picked up best actress.

Olin plays Maya Dardel, an internationally respected poet and novelist, living in the Santa Cruz Mountains of California. One day she announces on the radio that she intends to end her life and that young male writers may compete to become the executor of her estate. They are challenged intellectually, emotionally and erotically, until one of them begins to fathom Maya’s end game.

Co-stars include Rosanna Arquette (“Crash”), Joardan Gavaris (“The Sea of Trees”), Nathan Keyes (“Britney Ever After”) and
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Riviera, Rillington Place: UK Drama Series to Launch on Sundance Now

SundanceTV is importing some dramas from across the pond. Recently, the network announced UK TV shows Riviera and Rillington Place are coming to the streaming service Sundance Now.A thriller, Riviera stars Julia Stiles as Georgina, a newly married woman who discovers the criminal secrets behind her husband's billionaire fortune. The cast also includes Lena Olin, Adrian Lester, Iwan Rheon, Anthony Lapaglia, and Phil Davis. Riviera launches on Sundance Now on September 14th.Read More…
See full article at TVSeriesFinale »

Sundance Now Orders ‘Back,’ Sets Premieres for ‘Riviera’ and ‘Rillington Place’

Sundance Now Orders ‘Back,’ Sets Premieres for ‘Riviera’ and ‘Rillington Place’
Streaming service Sundance Now is beefing up its slate with a new original comedy along with two acquisitions.

Back,” a six-part comedy, is created and written by Simon Blackwell (“Veep”), directed by Ben Palmer (“The Inbetweeners”) and starring David Mitchell (“Peep Show”) and Robert Webb (“Peep Show”).

The comedy, which will premiere on Sundance Now in fall 2017 and on SundanceTV in 2018, follows Stephen (Mitchell) as he tries to follow in his recently deceased father’s footsteps and take over the family business, but his plans are foiled by the unexpected return of his estranged foster brother, Andrew (Webb).

“Funny and clever with a strong emotional heart, ‘Back’ is an auteur-driven series that brings together a unique pairing of some of today’s best comedic minds,” said Jan Diedrichsen, general manager of SundanceTV and Sundance Now. “It is the perfect entrée into comedy for Sundance Now, with its compelling yet relatable characters and hilarious storylines.”

The
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Samuel Goldwyn & Orion Acquire SXSW Pic ‘Maya Dardel’

Orion Pictures and Samuel Goldwyn Films have teamed for their second pickup of a SXSW film this week, acquiring North American rights to Maya Dardel, the drama co-written and co-directed by Zachary Cotler and Magdalena Zyzak and starring Lena Olin. It bowed in Austin this year under the title A Critically Endangered Species. Olin stars as Maya Dardel, an internationally respected poet and novelist who lived until 2016 in the Santa Cruz Mountains of California. That’s when…
See full article at Deadline »

Daniel Day-Lewis Quits Acting: Here Are the Roles We’ll Treasure the Most

  • Indiewire
Daniel Day-Lewis Quits Acting: Here Are the Roles We’ll Treasure the Most
Daniel Day-Lewis dropped a bombshell on fans of his work worldwide when he announced that he would be retiring from acting, just a few months before the release of his purported last role, in Paul Thomas-Anderson’s upcoming “Phantom Thread.” One of the world’s most coveted actors has a surprisingly nimble filmography. Even as it stretches back to the early eighties, Day-Lewis didn’t become a big name until his breakout role in Stephen Frears’ 1985 “My Beautiful Laundrette,” followed by a series of acclaimed roles in “A Room With a View,” “The Unbearable Lightness of Being,” and “My Left Foot,” which won him the first of three Academy Awards. The other Oscars arrived for back-to-back roles in “There Will Be Blood” and “Lincoln,” leaving no doubt that the versatile performer was still at the top of his game.

See MoreDaniel Day-Lewis Announces He Is Retiring From Acting

But these highlights are only a few of the astonishing achievements in the actor’s robust output. Here are the ones we’ll treasure for all time, while holding out hope that this legendary talent’s final performance will land a spot as well.

A Room With a View

It was one of his very last supporting roles, but Daniel Day-Lewis was the embodiment of Cecil Vyse in Merchant Ivory’s 1986 adaptation of E.M. Forster’s “A Room With a View.” In lesser hands, Lucy Honeychurch’s jilted suitor might have been little more than a prissy sad sack; Day-Lewis invested the character with empathy, as if Cecil knew his reach exceeded his grasp. While Lucy may have viewed their match as a prison narrowly escaped, Day-Lewis’ performance suggested a man who couldn’t get beyond his own pince-nez, but loved her so much that he let her go. —Dana Harris

The Age of Innocence” The emotions in Day-Lewis’s character are often big and ever present. But the performances that best showcase his talent are when he plays a more genteel character – his manner poised, cadence deliberate, body at rest. Yet in playing Newland Archer in Edith Wharton’s rigid 19th Century high society, he is effortless in accessing the desperate yearning that lies beneath his impossibly calm demeanor. His ability to translate complex thoughts, burning emotions and his character’s interior life through a completely placid surface is a marvel. —Chris O’Falt “Gangs of New York

There’s a titanic force lurking under each of Day-Lewis’ roles, but nowhere was that energy unleashed better than in Martin Scorsese’s 2002 city-spanning epic “Gangs of New York.” Bill the Butcher combined the actor’s ferocity with an unbridled villainous streak, an antagonist as evil as he is charming. Day-Lewis has always excelled in quiet roles, but Bill is a reminder that his flair for the theatrical is rarely equalled. Watching Bill play to an audience inside a rowdy theater or to a gathered crowd of terrified citizens, there’s a twisted thrill in seeing a true performer playing a true performer. —Steve Greene

The Last of the Mohicans” Arguably the actor’s most dreamy, overtly romantic role, Day-Lewis’ turn in Michael Mann’s 1992 historical action-adventure is both totally swoon-worthy and emotionally satisfying. As the adopted son of the eponymous last of the Mohican tribe, Day-Lewis plays his Hawkeye as a hero in the most classic sense, but aided by the actor’s formidable chops, the role (and the film) take on added dimension and complexity. Mann’s film is a heart-pounding adventure that doesn’t skimp on the tough stuff (people are scalped and burnt alive and commit suicide in order to escape worse fates, and that’s just the wide strokes), and it’s grounded by Day-Lewis’ trademark dedication and sincerity to the essential beats of his characters. Slipping easily between breakneck adventure (few movies contain so many scenes of artful running through the woods as “Mohicans”) and dreamy leading man (his chemistry with Madeleine Stowe all but aches right off the screen), turning in one of his more overlooked performances in a long line of lauded roles. It’s a film, and a part, that satisfies even more than two decades later. —Kate Erbland “Lincoln”

Day-Lewis won this third Best Actor Oscar — more than any actor in history — for playing the title role in Steven Spielberg’s “Lincoln” because the movie is unimaginable without him. It took years for Spielberg to convince the recalcitrant Brit to play the American icon. Always willing to wait years between cherry-picked roles, replenishing his batteries by reengaging with the world, Day-Lewis finally broke down after Tony Kushner’s sprawling script focused on January 1865, when Lincoln maneuvered Congress into passing the Thirteenth Amendment to the Constitution, which ended slavery in America. “The important thing is they got Lincoln,” Lincoln biographer Doris Kearns Goodwin told me at the L.A. premiere, “his stooped walk, his high-pitched voice, his humor.”

Day-Lewis is a draw for moviegoers because when the match is perfect between director and role, when it feels right, he gives his all. He embraces a role so totally that it consumes and overtakes him. He loses himself in the part throughout production. As usual, Day-Lewis’s preparation was intense. He worked in seclusion until he sent Spielberg tape recorder audio of his approximation of the 16h president’s reedy tenor. He nailed his first scene on-set, an eight-minute speech about the Emancipation Proclamation, on the first take with no on-set rehearsal. Day-Lewis stayed in character throughout the shoot, addressed by all as “Mr. President.” No socializing on set saves energy, Day-Lewis has said. It’s fair to say that Day-Lewis is Abraham Lincoln, and the people went to see it because the actor was in it. —Anne Thompson

My Left Foot: The Story of Christy Brown

Jim Sheridan’s period drama revolves about Christy Brown, the cerebral palsy-stricken painter who struggles to engage with the family around him until he discovers the one vocation he can control with his foot. However, that summary barely gets to the essence of the movie’s emotional core. It’s a naturally engaging story about perseverance against daunting physical challenges, made all the more heartbreaking by the intolerant times in which it takes place — but it would be nothing without the young Day-Lewis in the lead role, one that few actors could tackle without risking accusations of parody. Instead, he turns Brown into a vibrating, energetic creative figure battling to express his emotions and overcome the pity that surrounds him at every turn. It’s at once heartbreaking and hopeful, a testament to perseverance in which the performance embodies the themes to its core. Day-Lewis won his first Oscar for the role, and even as he continued to tackle new challenges, he already confirmed his mastery at this early stage. —Eric Kohn

My Beautiful Laundrette

From the start of his career Day-Lewis showed a penchant for muscular, angry and violent roles, starting with Stephen Frears’s searing 16 mm portrait of Margaret Thatcher’s London, “My Beautiful Laundrette,” which jumped from TV movie to arthouse phenomenon at the Edinburgh Film Festival. “I spent most of my time on the front line of London street life,” Day-Lewis said at the 2013 Santa Barbara Film Festival, “playing soccer, fighting on the school playground, and rebelling against authority and the British class system.” A controversial early exploration of sex, race and class, “My Beautiful Launderette” broke out Lewis, director Frears, rookie screenwriter Hanif Kureishi (who earned an Oscar nomination) and Working Title Films. With swaggering, sexy humor, Day-Lewis played Johnny, the street-tough ex-National Front boyfriend of Omar (Gordon Warnecke), the son of a Pakistani immigrant, who helps his childhood friend to renovate his uncle’s Battersea laundrette. Fears cast Day-Lewis after meeting him and asking him about his South London accent. Frears said: “‘You’re the son of a poet laureate, why are you speaking like that?’ He said he’d been to a comprehensive and had adopted it as a defence. Then he wrote me a letter saying he’d kill me if he wasn’t cast.” No one knew “My Beautiful Laundrette” would become an iconic film about the 1980s. —Anne Thompson

The Unbearable Lightness of Being” Day-Lewis was a perfect if unexpected choice to play Tomas, the detached lover at the center of this erotically charged adaptation of Czech novelist Milan Kundera’s most famous work. Disciplined in his practice surrounding sex and romantic attachments, Tomas bounces between Sabina (Lena Olin) and Tereza (Juliette Binoche) as both ravenous lover and aloof philosopher. Day-Lewis brings a perfect blend of lithe sexuality and mystery to Tomas, light on his feet and heavy in the head. He famously learned Czech for the part (a notoriously difficult language), and as a result his accent is spot on. What else would you expect from the man who made “method acting” a household term? —Jude Dry “There Will Be Blood

His voice lowered to a rumbling baritone beneath a scruffy mustache, Daniel Plainview becomes an extraordinary figure of capitalist intensity within a matter of minutes. Paul Thomas-Anderson’s most audacious filmmaking feat was matched by Day-Lewis’ remarkable transformation into the scheming, relentless oil miner and the empire he cobbles together in the heat. From the virtuosic intensity of his early management of a drilling company to the psychotic extremes of his final stage, Plainview is emblematic of the darkness lurking at the center of the American dream — which is why it’s all the more extraordinary that he’s played by an Englishman.

But of course, he’s not just an Englishman, he’s Daniel Day-Lewis, an actor so capable of transforming himself that in “There Will Be Blood” he seems to be reborn before our very eyes. Hovering on the edge of camp, he manages to take a line that on paper sounds patently ridiculous — you know, something about drinking someone else’s milkshake — and turn it into an iconic moment in film history, one loaded with the rage of boundless American greed. He was a lock for Best Actor the moment the cameras stopped rolling.

Related storiesDaniel Day-Lewis Announces He Is Retiring From ActingIsabelle Huppert, Mariachi and a History Lesson: Cannes Celebrates Its 70th Year With a Lively NightMark Boal and Annapurna Pictures Are Getting Into the Documentary Business
See full article at Indiewire »

The Mystery of Kinka Usher

The answer to the eternal question: What ever happened to the director of ‘Mystery Men’?

The first thing to notice about Kinka Usher’s Twitter account — which we’ll assume is the real deal, even in the absence of a blue check mark — is its profile description: “I directed the movie that actually made All Star by Smash Mouth popular.” As far as legacies go, we can agree this would be an ignoble one, assuming that’s all there was to it. The description does not clarify the movie in question however.

So then, the second thing to notice, after a bit of scrolling, is the title of said movie: Mystery Men. The film, based on marginal superhero characters from an obscure comic book (where my Flaming Carrot fans at?) and released in 1999, stars Ben Stiller, William H. Macy, Janeane Garofalo, and an almost literally unbelievable list of others. Smash Mouth is indeed heard on the soundtrack
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

Miptv: Julia Stiles, Lena Olin on the Shady Side of Sunny 'Riviera'

With ITV's South of France drama, Riviera, producer Paul McGuiness and Oscar-winning screenwriter Neil Jordan set out to bring Somerset Maugham’s famous line about the Cote d’Azur —“a sunny place for shady people” — to the small screen.

According to McGuinness, the idea started with wanting to create a show “about rich people doing terrible things, with yachts, Lamborginis, beautiful clothes, beautiful women, money, art and glamour, reflecting that old line ‘Behind every great fortune is a great crime.’ ”

What they came up with is a family crime drama starring Julia Stiles and Lena Olin set among the rich and...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - TV News »

MipTV Review: ‘Riviera’ from Sky Atlantic

MipTV Review: ‘Riviera’ from Sky Atlantic
Cannes — “Riviera” couldn’t have had a more appropriate setting for its world premiere: The slick, satisfying Sky Atlantic drama debuted at the MipTV conference, in front of an industry audience that very likely appreciated its carefully calibrated international appeal.

There’s nothing radical or challenging about “Riviera”: It efficiently combines elements of soap operas, murder mysteries and thrillers, and, as the frosting on top, it gives viewers a peek at the luxurious lives of the oligarch-adjacent global elite. Designer gowns, devastatingly expensive paintings, drop-dead real estate and fast cars are the order of the day, but those baubles are tastefully displayed within a story that appears to have a solid foundation and promising premise. Those who reveled in the similarly glam settings and the morally dubious characters of “The Night Manager” will no doubt enjoy “Riviera,” which features a strong central performance from Julia Stiles.

Stiles’ first challenge is to make the audience care about
See full article at Variety - TV News »

‘The Disaster Artist’ Review: James Franco is Very Good as a Bad Actor in His Loving Tribute to ‘The Room’ — SXSW 2017

  • Indiewire
‘The Disaster Artist’ Review: James Franco is Very Good as a Bad Actor in His Loving Tribute to ‘The Room’ — SXSW 2017
The Room” is a bad movie that people love to mock. “The Disaster Artist” is a good movie about the making of that bad movie, which is a lot harder to pull off. While director and star James Franco’s behind-the-scenes recreation of Tommy Wiseau and Greg Sestero’s cult classic carries a lingering sense of “having their cake and eating it, too,” the film is less focused on mocking the failures of its source material. From laugh to laugh — and there are many — you might question the target of the jones, but that’s often because “The Disaster Artist” rarely works on one level: There’s meta humor, self-referential gags, and human reverence paid to the earnest pursuit of a Hollywood dream.

Such are the layered joys of this exuberant — if surprisingly conventional — buddy comedy about the making of the worst movie of all time.

Compared to “The Room,
See full article at Indiewire »

‘A Critically Endangered Species’ Review: Lena Olin Is Riveting in Unnerving Feminist Character Study — Swsw 2017

  • Indiewire
‘A Critically Endangered Species’ Review: Lena Olin Is Riveting in Unnerving Feminist Character Study — Swsw 2017
Acerbic isn’t a strong enough word to explain the singular attitude and outlook of author Maya Dardel. The gravelly-voiced has-been (well, maybe) is first introduced to the audience of Zachary Cotler and Magdalena Zyzak’s “A Critically Endangered Species” by way of a rambling NPR interview that caps off with Maya (an electric Lena Olin) announcing her intention to off herself, and that’s before the opening credits are even over. Maya is plain-spoken about her plan, only really mentioning it to tout her desire to find an heir and executor to take over her life and work (and money and house and fame and whatever else she has) after she does the deed.

Sarcastic, biting, and wholly unsentimental, Maya explains that “death’s lucrative” and she’s simply eager to get her affairs in order before shuffling off this mortal coil. She’s looking for a male author
See full article at Indiewire »

'A Critically Endangered Species': Film Review | SXSW 2017

'A Critically Endangered Species': Film Review | SXSW 2017
There are few things worse than seeing a talented performer squandered. That's been the stateside fate of the great Swedish actress Lena Olin, whose biggest claim to fame on American shores is as Jennifer Garner's treacherous mother on the spy series Alias. (Preferable, one supposes, to her role as Robert Pattinson's progenitor in the hilariously offensive 9/11 tragi-romance Remember Me.) So the initial scenes of A Critically Endangered Species, from debuting feature writer-directors Zachary Cotler and Magdalena Zyzak, hold some measure of promise because, for the first time in a long time, Olin gets some prime red meat to chew on.

She plays...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Cinema, Chimera: A Critically Endangered Species Director Zachary Cotler on the Present Value of Difficulty

Set in the literary world and dealing with a dying poet and novelist with an unusual end-of-life proposal, the Lena Olin-starring A Critically Endangered Species is directed by two filmmakers who know something about the world of their film. Magdalena Zyzak wrote the recent novel The Ballad of Barnabas Pierkel as well as co-wrote and produced the feature film, Redland. Zachary Cotler is the author of five books of poetry, fiction and literary criticism, and is a graduate of the Iowa Writer’s Workshop. In advance of their film’s premiere at the 2017 SXSW Film Festival, they’ve each penned an essay […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

Unaffordable Objects: A Critically Endangered Species Director Magdalena Zyzak on Description in Film and Literature

Set in the literary world and dealing with a dying poet and novelist with an unusual end-of-life proposal, the Lena Olin-starring A Critically Endangered Species is directed by two filmmakers who know something about the world of their film. Magdalena Zyzak wrote the recent novel The Ballad of Barnabas Pierkel as well as co-wrote and produced the feature film, Redland. Zachary Cotler is the author of five books of poetry, fiction and literary criticism, and he’s a graduate of the Iowa Writer’s Workshop. In advance of their film’s premiere at the 2017 SXSW Film Festival, they’ve each penned an essay […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

‘Baby Driver’ Review: Edgar Wright’s Brilliant Car Chase Musical Casts Ansel Elgort As an Outlaw Fred Astaire — SXSW 2017

  • Indiewire
‘Baby Driver’ Review: Edgar Wright’s Brilliant Car Chase Musical Casts Ansel Elgort As an Outlaw Fred Astaire — SXSW 2017
Like every Edgar Wright movie since “Shaun of the Dead,” the director’s fifth feature, “Baby Driver,” takes a ludicrous concept and turns it into a brilliant exercise in high style and a rush of big ideas. The director’s most ambitious work to date is a wildly successful romantic heist comedy, propelled from scene to scene with a lively soundtrack that elevates its slick chase scenes into a realm that develops its own satisfying beat.

If Busby Berkeley made “Grand Theft Auto,” it might look something like this exuberant comic caper, in which young getaway driver Baby (Ansel Elgort) speeds through highways and back alleys seemingly impervious to police advances so long as he has a smooth beat to guide his maneuvers. Operating under the employ of robbery maestro Doc (a stern Kevin Spacey), Baby quietly works off a debt to his boss by hauling two-bit criminals out of harm’s way,
See full article at Indiewire »
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