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Are You There God? It’s Me, Terrence Malick

By Jacob Oller

The filmmaker’s camera always seems to move towards the light. errence Malick isn’t really a down-to-earth guy. That’s not his capacity as a director, nor as a human. He’s decided to embrace the poetry of life in all its forms, which sometimes means his films can feel a little bit flighty. Other times, they are […]

The article Are You There God? It’s Me, Terrence Malick appeared first on Film School Rejects.
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30 Best World War II Movies for Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day (Photos)

  • The Wrap
30 Best World War II Movies for Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day (Photos)
Looking to look back on some history this Memorial Day? Critics and audiences alike didn’t think “Pearl Harbor” did WWII justice, but here are 29 other films that scored a 7/10 rating or higher on IMDb. “Pearl Harbor” (2001). The Michael Bay-directed film starred Ben Affleck, Josh Hartnett and Kate Beckinsale and follows the story of two best friends as they go off to war. “Saving Private Ryan” (1998). Starring Tom Hanks, Matt Damon, Tom Sizemore and Edward Burns, the film follows a group of U.S. soldiers that go behind enemy lines to retrieve a paratrooper. “The Thin Red Line” (1998). Terrence Malick‘s adaptation of.
See full article at The Wrap »

"Silent Running" 45Th Anniversary Screening, L.A., December 13

  • CinemaRetro
By Todd Garbarini

Douglas Trumbull’s 1972 film Silent Running celebrates its 45th anniversary with a special screening at Laemmle's Ahrya Fine Arts Theatre in Los Angeles. Starring Bruce Dern, Cliff Potts, and Ron Rifkin, the G-rated film runs 89 minutes and is being showcased on the big screen in a rare opportunity.

Please Note: Director Douglas Trumbull and Producer Michael Gruskoff are scheduled to appear in person for a Q & A following the screening.

From the press release:

Silent Running (1972)

45th Anniversary Screening

Wednesday, December 13, at 7:30pm at the Ahrya Fine Arts

Q&A with Special Guests Director Douglas Trumbull and Producer Michael Gruskoff

Laemmle Theatres and the Anniversary Classics Series present a 45th anniversary screening of the groundbreaking sci-fi movie Silent Running which marked the directorial debut of special effects wizard Douglas Trumbull. Set 100 years in the future, the prophetic script by Deric Washburn, Michael Cimino, and Steven Bochco
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Guillermo Del Toro’s ‘The Shape of Water’ Is One of His Best Films Because It’s His Most Conventional — Opinion

Guillermo Del Toro’s ‘The Shape of Water’ Is One of His Best Films Because It’s His Most Conventional — Opinion
Guillermo del Toro loves fairy tales. That’s been clear to moviegoers the world over since “Pan’s Labyrinth,” which took the Mexican auteur to new levels of international acclaim, and it’s brought into sharper relief than ever before by “The Shape of Water.” Its narrative, about a mute woman who falls in love with a fish-like creature at a research facility during the height of the Cold War, is both out-there and familiar — a description that applies to del Toro’s work in general.

Like all the best fairy tales, there’s a reservoir of darkness just beneath the surface of his latest; also like them, it’s a strange story told in a straightforward manner. Call it the shape of del Toro.

Read More:‘The Shape of Water’ Star Doug Jones: Beneath Foam and Latex, a Best Actor Candidate Shines

The way he’s perceived in
See full article at Indiewire »

Lionsgate Sets January UK Home Release For David Lowery’s ‘A Ghost Story’

Truly one of the best and most original films of the year is David Lowery’s A Ghost Story. Lionsgate Home Entertainment has just revealed plans to release the film across the home formats in the UK in January, and we have the full details below.

Casey Affleck follows up his Best Actor Oscar win this year with an extraordinary performance in this unique and moving existential fantasy drama that will surely haunt next season’s awards ceremonies.

Affleck stars alongside Rooney Mara, twice Oscar-nominated for her roles in The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo and Carol. There is a wonderful poignancy between the pair, who, torn apart by grief, must come to terms with the implications of their mortality. The supporting cast includes an inspired appearance by acclaimed musician Will Oldham.

Writer and director David Lowery, who provides a revealing audio commentary on the H.E release, displaying the
See full article at The Hollywood News »

‘Call Me by Your Name’ Director Luca Guadagnino Hates Actors Who ‘Act’: ‘It’s Almost Pornographic’ – Toolkit Podcast

‘Call Me by Your Name’ Director Luca Guadagnino Hates Actors Who ‘Act’: ‘It’s Almost Pornographic’ – Toolkit Podcast
Timothée Chalamet and Armie Hammer are racking up accolades and early awards for playing lovers in “Call Me by Your Name,” but director Luca Guadagnino insists he didn’t cast them as a a pair or because he sensed they would work well together.

“I felt that if I loved them and wanted them, they were going to want and love one another,” said Guadagnino when he was a guest on IndieWire’s Filmmaker Toolkit podcast. “It was a bet, but you always have to make a bet. Filmmakers are all charlatans, you have to pretend you know what you are doing and you have to pretend that you are doing something very deep, but sometimes you are just improvising.”

Guadagnino also did not spend much time rehearsing with the two actors beforehand. Shooting the film largely in chronological order, the director said he and his leads just “figured it
See full article at Indiewire »

Emmanuel Lubezki’s Cinematic Eye: 20 Shots That Define His Iconic Career

Emmanuel Lubezki’s Cinematic Eye: 20 Shots That Define His Iconic Career
The iconic cinematographer has won three Oscars and worked with icons like Terrence Malick, Alfonso Cuaron, and Alejandro González Iñárritu during the course of his career. Let’s look back at 20 of his very best shots.

Related storiesHow 'La 92' Directors Sorted Through 1,700 Hours of Footage for Their Sobering FilmAlamo Drafthouse's Fantastic Fest Announces New Female-Led Board in Wake of Harassment Claims'Strong Island' Director Powerfully Breaks Down America's Race Problem with Danny Glover and Angela Davis -- Watch
See full article at Indiewire »

Ventana Sur: Gullane’s ‘Bingo’ Sells to U.S./U.K. as Brazilian Producer Advances on 14-Title Film-tv Slate (Exclusive)

Buenos Aires — Produced by Gullane, directed by Daniel Rezende and sold by Paris-based Loco Films, Brazil’s foreign-language Academy Award entry “Bingo: The King of the Mornings” has closed U.S. and U.K. rights with Empyrean Pictures.

Headed by Dan Klabin and Ariel Elia, the London and Brazil-based Empyrean, already a co-producer on “Bingo,” will directly distribute in the U.S. A U.K. release is scheduled for Dec. 15, Gullane’s Fabiano Gullane told Variety.

A rollicking tragicomic take on the cost of fame in the Brazilian TV world of the ‘80s which marks the feature debut of Rezende, editor of Terrence Malick’s’s “Tree of Life,” “Bingo” has just seen its international premiere at the Tallinn Black Nights Film Festival.

Written by Luiz Bolognesi, whose screenwriting credits include 2017 Berlin Panorama hit “Just Like My Parents,” “Bingo” is also Brazil’s candidate for a Spanish Academy best Ibero-American Picture Goya, and has qualified
See full article at Variety - Film News »

LOLs with Haneke: I confess to the director about creating his cat-lover Twitter parody

Oscar-winner Michael Haneke can be as tough to interview as his films can be to watch. So what happened when our writer admitted to being the creator of a parody Twitter account that turned him into a tween-talking cat-lover?

There are a number of reasons to be nervous about interviewing Michael Haneke. The 75-year-old Oscar-winner has carved out a career filled with severity, from the cold-blooded torture of Funny Games to the sadomasochistic psychology of The Piano Teacher, to the bleak account of fascism in The White Ribbon. The Austrian’s off-screen persona has often been similarly austere: he’s painted as evasive, difficult and uncooperative.

But there was an added reason for my trepidation. In 2012, I launched a parody Twitter account in Haneke’s name. It was an extended joke that reimagined the director as a tween-talking, cat-loving, remarkably petty figure, who spent his time insulting Terrence Malick and
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

‘Mudbound’ Director Dee Rees Breaks the Rules of Narrative and Finds Truth in the Cracks — Filmmaker Toolkit Podcast

‘Mudbound’ Director Dee Rees Breaks the Rules of Narrative and Finds Truth in the Cracks — Filmmaker Toolkit Podcast
Mudbound” is not a multi-character film in the spirit of director Robert Altman, or 2006 Oscar-winner “Crash.” Instead of being a sprawling tapestry, the intertwined stories of two very different farming families (one black, one white) unfolds into one increasingly cohesive narrative.

“It’s almost like one story [that is] being handed off and everyone is [unaware] they are having similar conversations with themselves,” said director Dee Rees when she was a guest on IndieWire’s Filmmaker Toolkit podcast. “At one point [cinematographer] Rachel [Morrison] was like, ‘When has this ever worked?’ And I was like, ‘I don’t know, but this will be the film where it works.’”

To accomplish this, Rees grounds the audience in the subjectivity of six different protagonists, each with their own internal monologue. It’s something a novel — like Hillary Jordan’s “Mudbound,” which Rees and co-writer Virgil Williams’ adapted — can do effortlessly by accessing the internal thoughts of various characters,
See full article at Indiewire »

The Most Critically Divisive Films of the Last 17 Years, According to Gizmodo Study

The Most Critically Divisive Films of the Last 17 Years, According to Gizmodo Study
When “mother!” opened nationwide last month, it divided critics in a way no film had in a very long time. For every review that called the movie a masterpiece, there was one detesting it as nothing but Darren Aronofsky’s sick, bloated metaphor. Such a polarizing response can be exciting, and it would appear based on a new study that Aronofsky’s latest really does rank as one of the most divisive films of the 21st century.

Read More:Denis Villeneuve, Sofia Coppola and More Filmmakers Pick the Best Films of the 21st Century

The Gizmodo UK team has released their official ranking of the 50 most critically divisive movies of the last 17 year, and it’s a list that includes the likes of such provocateurs as Lars von Trier, Terrence Malick, Jonathan Glazer, Harmony Korine, David O. Russell, and more. Gizmodo looked at over 9,000 films listed on Metacritic with at least 40 reviews.
See full article at Indiewire »

Natalie Portman Shares Her Own Experiences With Harassment and Sexism: ‘I Have 100 Stories’

Natalie Portman Shares Her Own Experiences With Harassment and Sexism: ‘I Have 100 Stories’
Natalie Portman was only 11 years old when she auditioned for and won the role of Mathilda in Luc Besson’s “Léon: The Professional,” and after more than two decades making moves in Hollywood and abroad she has her own share of harassment and sexism stories. During a conversation at Vulture Fest in Los Angeles, Portman was asked about the many sexual harassment and abuse allegations coming out of Hollywood, to which she got incredibly candid about her own experiences facing similar issues.

Read More:Natalie Portman to Play Bull Rider in ‘The Fits’ Director Anna Rose Holmer’s New Film

“When I heard everything coming out, I was like, ‘Wow, I’m so lucky that I haven’t had this.’ And then, on reflection, I was like okay, definitely never been assaulted, definitely not, but I’ve had discrimination or harassment on almost everything I’ve ever worked on in some way,
See full article at Indiewire »

The Tree of Life: On Darren Aronofsky’s "The Fountain", A Decade Later

  • MUBI
Darren Aronofsky's The Fountain (2006) is showing on Mubi from November 12 - December 12, 1017 in the United Kingdom.“Finish it.”The exhortation is an integral part of the texture of The Fountain as a work of art, but it also refers, obliquely, maybe unconsciously, to all the toil and trouble that surrounded its six-year path to the big screen and its controversial reception. Darren Aronofsky—a headstrong filmmaker if there ever was one—could have simply shelved the project indefinitely after his original lead, Brad Pitt, bailed out prior to the start of the production. But, like the words that Izzi says to Tom and that echo throughout the film’s three interconnected timelines, he didn’t. He had to “finish it.” So Aronofsky did, regrouping, downsizing, rethinking a film that was inspired by both the out-there genre twisting of The Matrix and his own experiences with death. What emerged was
See full article at MUBI »

Sean Baker Cut Up Paul Thomas Anderson Long Takes To See if a Doc-Style Steadicam Would Work on ‘The Florida Project’

Sean Baker Cut Up Paul Thomas Anderson Long Takes To See if a Doc-Style Steadicam Would Work on ‘The Florida Project’
Sean Baker is a filmmaker who puts a premium on making his films feel as authentic as possible. For example, sometimes he will use a handheld camera to follow his characters — who are often played by first-time performers — to give a scene a sense of documentary realism. After “Tangerine” — Baker’s iPhone-shot indie breakout — he started to wonder if image stabilization advances in smartphone cameras was changing what audiences thought “real” footage looked like.

“Audiences see homemade raw footage, but with a stabilizer on,” said Baker when he was guest on IndieWire’s Filmmaker Toolkit podcast. “So everybody is shooting their Youtube and Instagram videos and they are all very smooth — so we’re changing the way audiences think about how cameras are held and if shots are stable or not.” This led Baker to consider if he could employ a documentary-style steadicam effectively to his next film, “The Florida Project.
See full article at Indiewire »

Hands Through Hair: Intimate Moments With Terrence Malick

By Jacob Oller

The wheat-loving poet creates touching interactions between his characters. hile they may not technically be quiet fields and heartfelt voiceover, the actors in director Terrence Malick’s flowy films share the same intimacy as Malick himself and things like grain or khaki cargo pants. The small brushes of fingertips or the camera’s quiet movement to focus […]

The article Hands Through Hair: Intimate Moments With Terrence Malick appeared first on Film School Rejects.
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Joachim Trier on Memory, Trauma, and the Fairytale Appeal of ‘Thelma’

In the course a decade, Joachim Trier has liked to set the bar high. With 2006’s Reprise marking the start, each film has proven more ambitious than the last; his latest, Thelma, continues that trend. It eschews Trier’s quietly dramatic, naturalist approach that characterizes previous works — and that came to a head in 2015 with the ambitious, American-made Louder Than Bombs — and instead finds him venturing into uncharted territories with a genre-blending mix of erotic thriller, supernatural horror, and coming-of-age films.

I found it to be among the best of the main-slate offerings at this years’ New York Film Festival — but, as our review can speak to, how much it succeeds might ultimately depend on your temperament. Whatever your stance on it, Trier’s ambition is palpable, and Thelma contains every reason to be excited for the new directions his career will take in the future.

We spoke to Trier
See full article at The Film Stage »

Joachim Trier Talks Making ‘Thelma’ & Rooting For Terrence Malick [Interview]

Some people are calling Joachim Trier‘s “Thelma” his first foray into the horror genre. It is not. “Thelma” is actually an indescribable mix of genres: drama, thriller, family, horror, mystery, comedy and, yes, even supernatural elements infuse Trier’s hypnotic fever dream of a movie.

Beautifully shot by Jakob Ihre with an attention to detail for every frame, the film is a calm, slow-burning character study.

Continue reading Joachim Trier Talks Making ‘Thelma’ & Rooting For Terrence Malick [Interview] at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

‘Mudbound’: Why Rachel Morrison Deserves to Be the First Female Cinematographer Nominated for an Oscar

‘Mudbound’: Why Rachel Morrison Deserves to Be the First Female Cinematographer Nominated for an Oscar
When cinematographer Rachel Morrison approached “Mudbound,” there was so much she didn’t want to do. She and director Dee Rees didn’t want to romanticize the postwar South, nor indulge the myth of “The Greatest Generation” in golden hues of a traditional period film.

Instead, building from the harsh realities of 1940s Mississippi racism, they found warmth in shared humanity, weaving a story that features six different protagonists from two very different farming families. A gritty, realistic look would be as inappropriate for “Mudbound” as what Morrison refers to as the “tea-stained” period film they were desperate to avoid.

“What I think makes ‘Mudbound’ great is there’s a beauty in its honesty, even when it’s muddy and everybody is dirty,” said Virgil Williams, who adapted the screenplay with Rees. “What Rachel did was provide a visual window through which that beauty could be seen by the audience.
See full article at Indiewire »

Terrence Malick-produced The Spearhead Effect comes to VOD, watch the trailer here

Coinciding with its VOD release today, The Orchard has unveiled a poster and trailer for The Spearhead Effect, which is directed by Caleb Smith and Brandon Moore, with Terrence Malick serving as executive producer. Check them out here…

When journalist Jake Stetson (Rane Jameson) exposes widespread police corruption, he soon finds himself a target of the violent vigilantes he unwittingly inspired. A thriller delving into the world of crooked cops and secret societies The Spearhead Effect is an intense ride from the moment you hit play.

The Spearhead Effect is out now on digital and on demand, and stars Rane Jameson, Caleb Smith and Leif Steinert.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »
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